ChickenBones: A Journal

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With wars and conflicts as part of any narrative for Africa’s underdevelopment, some

questions beggar answers: Is Africa, specifically sub-Saharan Africa, doomed? Will Africa

ever know peace?  What are the real causes of wars and conflicts in the continent?

 

 

 African Renaissance

                                                                                               Nov./Dec 2004

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Wars and Conflicts

Kofi Annan, Marcel Kitissou, Don Kraus, Peter Fabricus

Peter Ashton, Doris Avotri, Kenneth Omeje, Issaka K. Souare

Austin Onuoha, , Laurie Nathan, Solomon, Bankie Forster Bankie

 

From the Publisher

Jideofor Adibe, PhD

Editor, African Renaissance

Publisher: Adonis & Abbey Publishers Ltd

In this edition

In the September/October edition of the journal, we focused on the issue of African identity and sought answers to a number of fundamental questions: who is an African? Do all people regarded as Africans or having an African identity regard themselves as such? Are all who regard themselves as Africans accepted as being so? Where does African identity fit into in the mosaic of identities that people of African ancestry or people who have African passports bear? What should be the basis of any relationship between Africa and Africans in the Diaspora? 

In this edition we are taking on one of the most intractable problems in the continent: wars and conflicts. Africa has a disproportionate share of global conflicts and wars.  Some of the implications of this are clear: resources in conflict areas are diverted away from where they are needed most to procuring arms and containing insurrections, the image of the continent as a figurative expression for anarchy is reinforced in the western imagination, investors run scare, and the continent continues what some cynics have referred to as its terminal decline to the abyss.

With wars and conflicts as part of any narrative for Africa’s underdevelopment, some questions beggar answers: Is Africa, specifically sub-Saharan Africa, doomed? Will Africa ever know peace?  What are the real causes of wars and conflicts in the continent? And what should be done to prevent wars and effectively manage conflicts?

We have assembled some eleven thought-provoking articles on the theme, each focusing on a different dimension of the problem. As a framework, we have reprinted (with permission) the extensive report of the Secretary-General of the United Nations, Kofi Annan, to the Security Council, on the issue. We have reproduced the entire report - an exception to our strict policy that articles for the journal should be a maximum of 4,000 words. In fact so important do we consider the theme of wars and conflicts in Africa that one of our sister journals, the African Journal of Political and Social Research, a peer-reviewed scholarly quarterly, will debut next year with the theme (see page).

We believe the contributions on the theme, and the discussions of some of the contributions that follow (in our unique seminar/workshop format) are very thought-provoking, and will certainly be useful to policymakers on Africa and others engaged in conflict management elsewhere.

Besides the lead themes we have also assembled other thought-provoking articles – from an assessment of the relevance of Prime Minister Tony Blair’s Africa Commission, to a review of AIDS narratives in African fiction.

Our American debut

We made our debut in the USA and Canadian markets with our September/October edition, and sold out in less than a week. We have continued to receive inquiries about where copies could be bought. In North America, copies could be bought from independent stores or from many of the leading chains including Barnes & Noble, Hastings, Borders and Dalton. 

You can also contact our distributors in North America: Ingram periodicals Inc. at  magorder.sales@ingramperiodicals.com (phone: +1 615 793 5522).  

Inquiries from UK and Europe should be directed to Gazelle Distribution Services Ltd at sales@gazellebooks.co.uk (phone: +44 (0) 152468765).

Next edition

Since the events of 11 September 2001 and their aftermaths, ‘war on terrorism’ has been the dominant global rhetoric. In the US and much of the Western world, it has been one of the primary determinants of foreign policy. In the just concluded US presidential election, it was decisive in influencing the outcome of the election. But how has the war affected Africa? How does Africa see terrorism? Where does Africa stand in the whole ‘war against terror’? And what are the implications of the ‘war’ for Africa’s development aspirations, and for the entire democracy project in the continent?

Read about all these and more in the January/February 2005 edition of the journal.

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Chiefs in Cape Coast, Ghana  /  Grand Durbar Parade

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Guarding the Flame of Life / Strange Fruit Lynching Report

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Ancient African Nations

Contemporary African Immigrants to The United States  / African immigration to the United States

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African RenaissanceKwame Nkrumah, Kenyatta, and the Old Order / God Save His Majesty  

For Kwame Nkrumah  / Night of the Giants /   The Legend of the Saifs  /  Interview with Yambo Ouologuem   

Yambo  Bio & Review     African Renaissance (Journal)

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Our African Journey


We stood in El Mina slave dungeon, on the Cape Coast of Ghana on a recent trip to West Africa, overwhelmed by despair, grief, and rage. Without needing to verbalize it, we were both imagining what reaching this spot must have felt like for some long-ago, un-remembered African ancestor as she stood trembling on the precipice of an unknown and terrifyingly uncertain future.

It was hard to process the fact that for over three hundred years, millions of women, men and children, mothers, fathers, grandmothers, aunts, sisters, brothers, potters, weavers, had begun their long and brutal journey of being captured, kidnapped, sold, and enslaved from the very spot where we now stood the portal now infamously known as the door of no return.
Growing a Global Heart

Belvie and Dedan at the Door of No Return

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Bob Marley— Exodus

Bob Marley was a Jamaican singer-songwriter and musician. He was the lead singer, songwriter and guitarist for the ska, rocksteady and reggae bands The Wailers (19641974) and Bob Marley & the Wailers (19741981). Marley remains the most widely known and revered performer of reggae music, and is credited for helping spread both Jamaican music and the Rastafari movement (of which he was a committed member), to a worldwide audience.

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Exodus

           By Bob Marley


Exodus! Movement of Jah people! oh-oh-oh, yea-eah!
Well uh, oh. let me tell you this:

 

Men and people will fight ya down (tell me why!)
When ya see Jah light. (ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha!)
Let me tell you if you're not wrong; (then, why? )
Everything is all right.
So we gonna walk
All right!through de roads of creation:
We the generation (tell me why!)
Trod through great tribulation
trod through great tribulation.

Exodus! All right! Movement of Jah people!
Oh, yeah! o-oo, yeah! All right!
Exodus! Movement of Jah people! oh, yeah!

Yeah-yeah-yeah, well!
Open your eyes and look within.
Are you satisfied with the life you're living? uh!
We know where we're going, uh!
We know where we're from.
We're leaving Babylon,
We're going to our father's land.

 

One, Two, Three, Four
Exodus! Movement of Jah people! oh, yeah!
Movement of Jah people!
send us another Brother Moses!
Movement of Jah people!
from across the Red Sea!
Movement of Jah people!
send us another Brother Moses!
Movement of Jah people!
from across the Red Sea!
Movement of Jah people!

Exodus! All right! oo-oo-ooh! oo-ooh!
Movement of Jah people! oh, yeah!
Exodus!
Exodus! All right!
Exodus! now, now, now, now!
Exodus!
Exodus! oh, yea-ea-ea-ea-ea-ea-eah!
Exodus!
Exodus! All right!
Exodus! uh-uh-uh-uh!

 

One, Two, Three, Four
Move! Move! Move! Move! Move! Move!

Open your eyes and look within.
Are you satisfied with the life you're living?
We know where we're going;
We know where we're from.
We're leaving Babylon, yall!
We're going to our father's land.

Exodus! All right! Movement of Jah people!
Exodus! Movement of Jah people!
Movement of Jah people!
Movement of Jah people!
Movement of Jah people!
Movement of Jah people!


Move! Move! Move! Move! Move! Move! Move!

Jah come to break downpression,
Rule equality.
Wipe away transgression.
Set the captives free!

Exodus! All right, all right!
Movement of Jah people! oh, yeah!
Exodus! Movement of Jah people! oh, now, now, now, now!
Movement of Jah people!
Movement of Jah people!
Movement of Jah people!
Movement of Jah people!
Movement of Jah people!
Movement of Jah people!

Move! Move! Move! Move! Move! Move! uh-uh-uh-uh!
Movement of Jah people!
Move!
Movement of Jah people!
Move!
Movement of Jah people)!
Move!
Movement of Jah people! Movement of Jah people!
Movement of Jah people)!
Movement of Jah people)!
Movement of Jah people!
Movement of Jah people!
Movement of Jah people!

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The Slave Ship

By Marcus Rediker

In this groundbreaking work, historian and scholar Rediker considers the relationships between the slave ship captain and his crew, between the sailors and the slaves, and among the captives themselves as they endured the violent, terror-filled and often deadly journey between the coasts of Africa and America. While he makes fresh use of those who left their mark in written records (Olaudah Equiano, James Field Stanfield, John Newton), Rediker is remarkably attentive to the experiences of the enslaved women, from whom we have no written accounts, and of the common seaman, who he says was a victim of the slave trade . . . and a victimizer. Regarding these vessels as a strange and potent combination of war machine, mobile prison, and factory, Rediker expands the scholarship on how the ships not only delivered millions of people to slavery, [but] prepared them for it. He engages readers in maritime detail (how ships were made, how crews were fed) and renders the archival (letters, logs and legal hearings) accessible. Painful as this powerful book often is, Rediker does not lose sight of the humanity of even the most egregious participants, from African traders to English merchants.— Publishers Weekly

Marcus Rediker is professor of maritime history at the University of Pittsburgh and the author of Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea (1987), The Many-Headed Hydra (2000), and Villains of All Nations (2005), books that explore seafaring, piracy, and the origins of globalization. In The Slave Ship, Rediker combines exhaustive research with an astute and highly readable synthesis of the material, balancing documentary snapshots with an ear for gripping narrative. Critics compare the impact of Rediker’s history, unique for its ship-deck perspective, to similarly compelling fictional accounts of slavery in Toni Morrison’s Beloved and Charles Johnson’s Middle Passage. Even scholars who have written on the subject defer to Rediker’s vast knowledge of the subject. Bottom line: The Slave Ship  is sure to become a classic of its subject.—Bookmarks Magazine  

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The Death of Emmett Till by Bob Dylan  /  The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll  Only a Pawn in Their Game

Rev. Jesse Lee Peterson Thanks America for Slavery

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Strange Fruit Lynching Report / Anniversary of a Lynching

  Willie McGhee Lynching  / My Grandfather's Execution

Dr. Robert Lee Interview / African American Dentist in Ghana

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African Aid breeds African dependency

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Speaking Truth to Power: Selected Pan-African Postcards

By Tajudeen Abdul-Raheem (Author)

 Salim Ahmed Salim (Preface), Horace Campbell (Foreword)

Dr Tajudeen Abdul-Raheem's untimely death on African Liberation Day 2009 stunned the Pan-African world. This selection of his Pan-African postcards, written between 2003 and 2009, demonstrates the brilliant wordsmith he was, his steadfast commitment to Pan-Africanism, and his determination to speak truth to power. He was a discerning analyst of developments in the global and Pan-African world and a vociferous believer in the potential of Africa and African people; he wrote his weekly postcards for over a decade. This book demonstrates Tajudeen Abdul-Raheem's ability to express complex ideas in an engaging manner. The Pan-African philosophy on diverse but intersecting themes presented in this book offers a legacy of his political, social, and cultural thought.

Represented here are his fundamental respect for the capabilities, potential and contribution of women in transforming Africa; penetrating truths directed at African politicians and their conduct; and deliberations on the institutional progress towards African union. He reflects on culture and emphasises the commonalities of African people.

Also represented are his denunciations of international financial institutions, the G8 and NGOs in Africa, with incisive analysis of imperialism's manifestations and impact on the lives of African people, and his passion for eliminating poverty in Africa. His personality bounces off the page—one can almost hear the passion of his voice, 'Don't Agonise! Organise!'

Tajudeen Abdul-Raheem (1961-2009) was a Rhodes scholar and obtained his D. Phil in Politics from Oxford University. In 1990 he became Coordinator of the Africa Research and Information Bureau and the founding editor of Africa World Review. He co-founded and led Justice Africa's work, becoming its Executive Director in 2004, and combined this with his role as General Secretary of the Pan-African Movement. He was chair of the Centre for Democracy and Development and of the Pan-African Development Education and Advocacy Programme in Uganda and became the UN Millennium Development Campaign's Deputy Director in 2006.

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The White Masters of the World

From The World and Africa, 1965

By W. E. B. Du Bois

W. E. B. Du Bois’ Arraignment and Indictment of White Civilization (Fletcher)

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Ancient African Nations

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The Death of Emmett Till by Bob Dylan  The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll  Only a Pawn in Their Game

Rev. Jesse Lee Peterson Thanks America for Slavery / George Jackson  / Hurricane Carter

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The Journal of Negro History issues at Project Gutenberg

The Haitian Declaration of Independence 1804  / January 1, 1804 -- The Founding of Haiti 

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update 7 May 2010 

 

 

 

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Related files: June/July 2004  Sept./Oct. 2004   Nov/Dec 2004  Jan/Feb 2005