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 There are laws that protect the “civil rights” of minorities. But there is

no federal law that specifically prohibits lynching.

 

 

Books by Walter White

 

The Fire in the Flint (novel,1924) / Flight (novel,1926)  / Rope and Faggot: A Biography of Judge Lynch (1929)

How far the Promised Land? 955) / A Man Called White (autobiography,1948).

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Books on Lynching & Racial Violence

 The Chronological History of the Negro in America (1969) /  Strain of Violence: Historical Studies of American Violence and Vigilantism (1975)

 

 But There Was No Peace: The Role of Violence in the Politics of Reconstruction (1984) / Lynch Law ( 1905)  / An American Dilemma (1944)

 

The Crucible of Race: Black-White Relations in the American South Since Emancipation (1984) / Encyclopedia of Southern Culture. (1989)

 

Rope and Faggot ( 1929)  /  The Tragedy of Lynching (1933)  /  Race Riot in East St, Louis (1964)  / Urban Racial Violence (1976)  

 

Report of the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders (1968)  /  Violence in America (1969)

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The American Institution of Lynching

By Amin Sharif

 

In 1946 and 1947, The Interracial Review spoke out against lynching in America.  "Walter White on Lynching," an essay  by Amy MacKenzie, came about by an interview with Walter White of the NAACP. In the other two instances, editorials were published advocating an end to lynching through passage of a federal Anti-Lynching Bill.. Mr. White’s interview appeared in September of 1946; the two editorials -- "Lynching Must Go!" and "The Anti-Lynching Bill" --  appeared in May and August of 1947, respectively. From these writings, one discovers how entrenched the attitudes of racial intolerance were some six decades ago in the USA..

What is made clear by these articles is that lynching was a pervasive practice against the Black population in the Upper and Deep South. By the Upper South, I am referring to states like Kentucky and Tennessee. Kentucky-Owensboro is where, according to Walter White, over 15,000 white men, women, and children assembled to watch the lynching of a “Negro convict.” Walter White is quick, maybe too quick, to point out that this incident was an “abnormal” occurrence. He is, unfortunately, referring to the size of the lynch mob and not the principal act -- the lynching.

What is tragic about these articles is that they each have imbedded within them the recorded lynching of a black person or persons. In the editorial "Lynching Must Go!"  twenty-eight white men were acquitted after having confessed to the mob murder of Willie Earle, a Negro of Greenville, South Carolina. In the editorial, "The Anti-Lynching Bill., the victims are two Negro couples murdered, again, by twenty-eight white men who were at the time of the editorial “still at liberty.” And always, the same reason is given for these attacks upon the “Negro” -- racial intolerance.

One can only posit a guess as to what it meant to be Black at a time when lynching occurred every few months, perhaps, even every few weeks. Black children had no need to fantasize about a boogey man living in their closets or beneath their beds. They had only to listen to the radio or hear the hushed conversations of their parents to be engulfed in a terror that did not end at dawn.

Of course, black people in the generations that followed had their own monsters to contend with. Just look at those grainy black and white images of the Civil Rights Days found in Ebony or Life magazine. Look passed the dogs and the water hoses. Look passed the black and white students being beaten senseless. Look closely into the faces of the white crowd surrounding those demonstrators. There, you will see how deeply hate can distort the human soul. There is no compassion, no trace of humanity in those faces.  For they have consumed the poison of their fathers.

Amy McKenzie, the interviewer of Walter White, begins her article by an observation of this process of  racial hatred -- the poison -- being passed from one white generation to the next. She gazes upon a picture of a young white girl, so small that she is carried in her mother’s arms, attending “Her first Lynching.” The obvious and prophetic implication of the picture, with its understated title, is that this will not be the child’s last appearance at what can only be described as an event of mass murder. And, as history would have it, this child’s generation is the one that was so resistant to Civil Rights. In a kind of bizarre twist, the mob murderers of the1940s explain the existence of the racists of the 1950s and 1960s.

Near the end of his interview, Walter White is fairly certain that one day an Anti-lynching Bill would be passed by Congress. And I am certain that most people, Black or white, believe that there must be a federal Anti-lynching law on the books. But what would you say if I told you that there is no such law. There are hate crime laws. There are laws that protect the “civil rights” of minorities. But there is no federal law that specifically prohibits lynching.

Why, you ask? The reason is simple. No American President has ever had the guts to present one to Congress. Roosevelt had the opportunity to push one through Congress during the New Deal but chose not to do so. Truman thought that his Commission on Civil Rights would take care of the lynching problem. After Roosevelt and Truman, lynching became a forgotten subject. But lynching has never been erased from the minds of Black people -- especially Black men.  Even today, there is a running joke about Black men from up North being careful when they go South for a visit. And it would all be funny, except beneath the humor lies a realization that today, as yesterday, the lynching of Black people is still among America’s oldest institutions.    

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Walter Francis White (July 1, 1893, Atlanta, Georgia – March 21, 1955, New York, New York) was an African American who became a spokesman for his community in the United States for almost a quarter of a century, and served as executive secretary (1931–1955) of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. He graduated from Atlanta University in 1916 (now Clark Atlanta University). In 1918 he joined the small national staff of the NAACP in New York at the invitation of James Weldon Johnson. White acted as Johnson's assistant national secretary. In 1931 he succeeded him at the helm of the NAACP.

White oversaw the plans and organizational structure of the fight against public segregation. Under his leadership, the NAACP set up the Legal Defense Fund, which raised numerous legal challenges to segregation and disfranchisement, and achieved many successes. Among these was the Supreme Court ruling in Brown v. Board of Education, which determined that segregated education was inherently unequal. He was the virtual author of President Truman's presidential order desegregating the armed forces after the Second World War. White also quintupled NAACP membership to nearly 500,000.In addition to his NAACP work, White was a journalist, novelist, and essayist, and influential in the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s.  Wikipedia.

 

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Walter Francis White (July 1, 1893, Atlanta, Georgia – March 21, 1955, New York, New York) was an African American who became a spokesman for his community in the United States for almost a quarter of a century, and served as executive secretary (1931–1955) of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. He graduated from Atlanta University in 1916 (now Clark Atlanta University). In 1918 he joined the small national staff of the NAACP in New York at the invitation of James Weldon Johnson. White acted as Johnson's assistant national secretary. In 1931 he succeeded him at the helm of the NAACP.

White oversaw the plans and organizational structure of the fight against public segregation. Under his leadership, the NAACP set up the Legal Defense Fund, which raised numerous legal challenges to segregation and disfranchisement, and achieved many successes. Among these was the Supreme Court ruling in Brown v. Board of Education, which determined that segregated education was inherently unequal. He was the virtual author of President Truman's presidential order desegregating the armed forces after the Second World War. White also quintupled NAACP membership to nearly 500,000.In addition to his NAACP work, White was a journalist, novelist, and essayist, and influential in the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s.  Wikipedia.

 

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Bill Moyers Interviews Douglass A. Blackmon

http://www.pbs.org/moyers/journal/06202008/watch2.html

Douglas A. Blackmon, Slavery by Another Name: The Re-Enslavement of Black Americans from the Civil War to World War II (2008)

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AALBC.com's 25 Best Selling Books


 

Fiction

#1 - Justify My Thug by Wahida Clark
#2 - Flyy Girl by Omar Tyree
#3 - Head Bangers: An APF Sexcapade by Zane
#4 - Life Is Short But Wide by J. California Cooper
#5 - Stackin' Paper 2 Genesis' Payback by Joy King
#6 - Thug Lovin' (Thug 4) by Wahida Clark
#7 - When I Get Where I'm Going by Cheryl Robinson
#8 - Casting the First Stone by Kimberla Lawson Roby
#9 - The Sex Chronicles: Shattering the Myth by Zane

#10 - Covenant: A Thriller  by Brandon Massey

#11 - Diary Of A Street Diva  by Ashley and JaQuavis

#12 - Don't Ever Tell  by Brandon Massey

#13 - For colored girls who have considered suicide  by Ntozake Shange

#14 - For the Love of Money : A Novel by Omar Tyree

#15 - Homemade Loves  by J. California Cooper

#16 - The Future Has a Past: Stories by J. California Cooper

#17 - Player Haters by Carl Weber

#18 - Purple Panties: An Eroticanoir.com Anthology by Sidney Molare

#19 - Stackin' Paper by Joy King

#20 - Children of the Street: An Inspector Darko Dawson Mystery by Kwei Quartey

#21 - The Upper Room by Mary Monroe

#22 – Thug Matrimony  by Wahida Clark

#23 - Thugs And The Women Who Love Them by Wahida Clark

#24 - Married Men by Carl Weber

#25 - I Dreamt I Was in Heaven - The Rampage of the Rufus Buck Gang by Leonce Gaiter

Non-fiction

#1 - Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention by Manning Marable
#2 - Confessions of a Video Vixen by Karrine Steffans
#3 - Dear G-Spot: Straight Talk About Sex and Love by Zane
#4 - Letters to a Young Brother: MANifest Your Destiny by Hill Harper
#5 - Peace from Broken Pieces: How to Get Through What You're Going Through by Iyanla Vanzant
#6 - Selected Writings and Speeches of Marcus Garvey by Marcus Garvey
#7 - The Ebony Cookbook: A Date with a Dish by Freda DeKnight
#8 - The Isis Papers: The Keys to the Colors by Frances Cress Welsing
#9 - The Mis-Education of the Negro by Carter Godwin Woodson

#10 - John Henrik Clarke and the Power of Africana History  by Ahati N. N. Toure

#11 - Fail Up: 20 Lessons on Building Success from Failure by Tavis Smiley

#12 -The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander

#13 - The Black Male Handbook: A Blueprint for Life by Kevin Powell

#14 - The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates by Wes Moore

#15 - Why Men Fear Marriage: The Surprising Truth Behind Why So Many Men Can't Commit  by RM Johnson

#16 - Black Titan: A.G. Gaston and the Making of a Black American Millionaire by Carol Jenkins

#17 - Brainwashed: Challenging the Myth of Black Inferiority by Tom Burrell

#18 - A New Earth: Awakening to Your Life's Purpose by Eckhart Tolle

#19 - John Oliver Killens: A Life of Black Literary Activism by Keith Gilyard

#20 - Alain L. Locke: The Biography of a Philosopher by Leonard Harris

#21 - Age Ain't Nothing but a Number: Black Women Explore Midlife by Carleen Brice

#22 - 2012 Guide to Literary Agents by Chuck Sambuchino
#23 - Chicken Soup for the Prisoner's Soul by Tom Lagana
#24 - 101 Things Every Boy/Young Man of Color Should Know by LaMarr Darnell Shields

#25 - Beyond the Black Lady: Sexuality and the New African American Middle Class  by Lisa B. Thompson

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Standing Fast: The Autobiography of Roy Wilkins

By Roy Wilkins and Tom Mathews

History will remember Roy Wilkins (1901–1981) as one of the great leaders of the twentieth century for his contributions to the advancement of civil rights in America. For nearly half a century—first as assistant secretary, also succeeding W. E. B. Dubois as editor of The Crisis, and finally succeeding Walter White as executive director—Roy Wilkins served and led the N.A.A.C.P. in their fight for justice for African Americans. Wilkins was a relentless pragmatist who advocated progressive change through legal action. He participated or led in the achievement of every major civil rights advance, working for the integration of the army, helping to plan and organize the historic march on Washington, and pushing every president from Franklin Roosevelt to Jimmy Carter to implement civil rights legislation. This is a dramatic story of one man's struggle for his people's rights, as well as a vivid recollection of the events and the people that have shaped modern black history.—Da Capo Press

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Across That Bridge: Life Lessons and a Vision for Change

By John Lewis

The Civil Rights Movement gave rise to the protest culture we know today, and the experiences of leaders like Congressman Lewis have never been more relevant. Now, more than ever, this nation needs a strong and moral voice to guide an engaged population through visionary change. Congressman John Lewis was a leader in the American Civil Rights Movement. He was chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and played a key role in the struggle to end segregation. Despite more than forty arrests, physical attacks, and serious injuries, John Lewis remained a devoted advocate of the philosophy of nonviolence. He is the author of his autobiography, Walking with the Wind: A Memoir of a Movement, and is the recipient of numerous awards from national and international institutions, including the Lincoln Medal; the John F. Kennedy “Profile in Courage” Lifetime Achievement Award (the only one of its kind ever awarded); the NAACP Spingarn Medal; and the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian honor, among many others.

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The White Masters of the World

From The World and Africa, 1965

By W. E. B. Du Bois

W. E. B. Du Bois’ Arraignment and Indictment of White Civilization (Fletcher)

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Ancient African Nations

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Negro Digest / Black World

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The Death of Emmett Till by Bob Dylan  The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll  Only a Pawn in Their Game

Rev. Jesse Lee Peterson Thanks America for Slavery

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The Journal of Negro History issues at Project Gutenberg

The Haitian Declaration of Independence 1804  / January 1, 1804 -- The Founding of Haiti 

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update 26 May 2012

 

 

 

Home    Civil Rights: Struggle for Black Power Amin Sharif Table    Lynching Index

Related files:  Roy Wilkins and Spiro Agnew in Annapolis   Commentary on "Color Line and War"     The American Institution of Lynching    Walter White on Lynching 

Letter from Eleanor Roosevelt   Editorials on Lynching     Walter White Biography  Walter White Biography Table  Walter White Reviews