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Mays was a powerful, credible, smooth speaker who captured

 the audience's full attention in the first few minutes and held it until the end

 
 

Books by Benjamin E. Mays

 

Born to Rebel: An Autobiography Disturbed about Man  /   The Negro's God, As Reflected in His Literature 

 

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Dr. Benjamin E. Mays Speaks

Representative Speeches of a Great American Orator

Edited by Freddie C. Colston 

Contents

 

Foreword

     Benjamin E. Mays: An African American Spokesperson as an Agent of Political Socialization by Hanes Walton, Jr.                                                                            vii 

 
Preface

xiii

Acknowledgements

xvii

Chapter 1  Introduction

1

Chapter 2  General Audiences

29

       Radio Address on the Seventy-Eighth Anniversary of Morehouse College

29

       The Liberal Arts College in an Atomic Age

32

       Why an Atlanta School Suit?

39

       Our Colleges and the Supreme Court Decision

44

       The Inauguration of President William H. Dennis, Jr.

50

       The Moral Aspects of Segregation

60

       Carolina Symposium on Public Affairs

67

       The Unlimited Task

73

       The Advantages of a Small, Christian, Private, Liberal Arts College

84

       Desegregation: An Opportunity and a Challenge

92

       An Impossible Dream Comes True

99

       Martin Luther King, Jr.

103

       Jimmy Carter

110

Chapter 3  Commencement Addresses

139

       The Paradox of Life

139

       The Challenge to Overcome the Major Disabilities of 341 Years in a Quarter of a Century

145

       A Crisis and a Challenge

155

       Twenty-Seven Years of Success and Failure at Morehouse

163

       The Universities' Unfinished Work

175

       The Challenge of the Seventies

182

       Three Enemies of Mankind: A Challenge to the University

189

       Education to What End?

195

Chapter 4  Sermons

203

       Except a Man be Born Again, he Cannot See the Kingdom of Heaven

203

       His Goodness Was Not Enough

207

       The Church Amidst Ethnic and Racial Tensions

213

       Why Jesus Called the Rich Man a Fool

224

       The Vocation of a Christian--In, But Not of, the World

229

       In What Shall We Glory?

234

       Why Should We Forgive?

240

Chapter 5  Eulogies

247

       Eulogy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

247

       Eulogy of Dr. Whitney Young, Jr.

254

       Eulogy of Dr. Mordecai Wyatt Johnson 258
Postscript

265

Bibliography

269

Index

273

About the Author

293

   
Source: Dr. Benjamin E. Mays Speaks  

Freddie C. Colston has published articles on politics and the black experience in professional journals. he was a student at Morehouse College during the presidency of Dr. Mays where he received his B.A. in political science in 1959. He received an M.A. from Atlanta University in 1966 and a Ph.D. in 1972 from Ohio State University; both graduate degrees are in political science. He has done extensive research on the life and career of Dr. Mays since 1984. The author has taught political science at Fort Valley State university, Southern University, University of Detroit, Dillard University, Tennessee State University, North Carolina Central University, and Georgia Southwestern State University. In addition to his academic appointments, Professor Colston served a stint at the Executive Seminar Center, U.S. Office of Personnel Management, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, where he resides.

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AALBC.com's 25 Best Selling Books

For July 1st through August 31st 2011
 

Fiction

#1 - Justify My Thug by Wahida Clark
#2 - Flyy Girl by Omar Tyree
#3 - Head Bangers: An APF Sexcapade by Zane
#4 - Life Is Short But Wide by J. California Cooper
#5 - Stackin' Paper 2 Genesis' Payback by Joy King
#6 - Thug Lovin' (Thug 4) by Wahida Clark
#7 - When I Get Where I'm Going by Cheryl Robinson
#8 - Casting the First Stone by Kimberla Lawson Roby
#9 - The Sex Chronicles: Shattering the Myth by Zane

#10 - Covenant: A Thriller  by Brandon Massey

#11 - Diary Of A Street Diva  by Ashley and JaQuavis

#12 - Don't Ever Tell  by Brandon Massey

#13 - For colored girls who have considered suicide  by Ntozake Shange

#14 - For the Love of Money : A Novel by Omar Tyree

#15 - Homemade Loves  by J. California Cooper

#16 - The Future Has a Past: Stories by J. California Cooper

#17 - Player Haters by Carl Weber

#18 - Purple Panties: An Eroticanoir.com Anthology by Sidney Molare

#19 - Stackin' Paper by Joy King

#20 - Children of the Street: An Inspector Darko Dawson Mystery by Kwei Quartey

#21 - The Upper Room by Mary Monroe

#22 – Thug Matrimony  by Wahida Clark

#23 - Thugs And The Women Who Love Them by Wahida Clark

#24 - Married Men by Carl Weber

#25 - I Dreamt I Was in Heaven - The Rampage of the Rufus Buck Gang by Leonce Gaiter

Non-fiction

#1 - Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention by Manning Marable
#2 - Confessions of a Video Vixen by Karrine Steffans
#3 - Dear G-Spot: Straight Talk About Sex and Love by Zane
#4 - Letters to a Young Brother: MANifest Your Destiny by Hill Harper
#5 - Peace from Broken Pieces: How to Get Through What You're Going Through by Iyanla Vanzant
#6 - Selected Writings and Speeches of Marcus Garvey by Marcus Garvey
#7 - The Ebony Cookbook: A Date with a Dish by Freda DeKnight
#8 - The Isis Papers: The Keys to the Colors by Frances Cress Welsing
#9 - The Mis-Education of the Negro by Carter Godwin Woodson

#10 - John Henrik Clarke and the Power of Africana History  by Ahati N. N. Toure

#11 - Fail Up: 20 Lessons on Building Success from Failure by Tavis Smiley

#12 -The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander

#13 - The Black Male Handbook: A Blueprint for Life by Kevin Powell

#14 - The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates by Wes Moore

#15 - Why Men Fear Marriage: The Surprising Truth Behind Why So Many Men Can't Commit  by RM Johnson

#16 - Black Titan: A.G. Gaston and the Making of a Black American Millionaire by Carol Jenkins

#17 - Brainwashed: Challenging the Myth of Black Inferiority by Tom Burrell

#18 - A New Earth: Awakening to Your Life's Purpose by Eckhart Tolle

#19 - John Oliver Killens: A Life of Black Literary Activism by Keith Gilyard

#20 - Alain L. Locke: The Biography of a Philosopher by Leonard Harris

#21 - Age Ain't Nothing but a Number: Black Women Explore Midlife by Carleen Brice

#22 - 2012 Guide to Literary Agents by Chuck Sambuchino
#23 - Chicken Soup for the Prisoner's Soul by Tom Lagana
#24 - 101 Things Every Boy/Young Man of Color Should Know by LaMarr Darnell Shields

#25 - Beyond the Black Lady: Sexuality and the New African American Middle Class  by Lisa B. Thompson

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Debt: The First 5,000 Years

By David Graeber

Before there was money, there was debt. Every economics textbook says the same thing: Money was invented to replace onerous and complicated barter systems—to relieve ancient people from having to haul their goods to market. The problem with this version of history? There’s not a shred of evidence to support it. Here anthropologist David Graeber presents a stunning reversal of conventional wisdom. He shows that for more than 5,000 years, since the beginnings of the first agrarian empires, humans have used elaborate credit systems to buy and sell goods—that is, long before the invention of coins or cash. It is in this era, Graeber argues, that we also first encounter a society divided into debtors and creditors.  Graeber shows that arguments about debt and debt forgiveness have been at the center of political debates from Italy to China, as well as sparking innumerable insurrections. He also brilliantly demonstrates that the language of the ancient works of law and religion (words like “guilt,” “sin,” and “redemption”) derive in large part from ancient debates about debt, and shape even our most basic ideas of right and wrong. We are still fighting these battles today without knowing it. Debt: The First 5,000 Years is a fascinating chronicle of this little known history—as well as how it has defined human history, and what it means for the credit crisis of the present day and the future of our economy.   Economist Glenn Loury  /Criminalizing a Race

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The New Jim Crow

Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness

By Michele Alexander

Contrary to the rosy picture of race embodied in Barack Obama's political success and Oprah Winfrey's financial success, legal scholar Alexander argues vigorously and persuasively that [w]e have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it. Jim Crow and legal racial segregation has been replaced by mass incarceration as a system of social control (More African Americans are under correctional control today... than were enslaved in 1850). Alexander reviews American racial history from the colonies to the Clinton administration, delineating its transformation into the war on drugs. She offers an acute analysis of the effect of this mass incarceration upon former inmates who will be discriminated against, legally, for the rest of their lives, denied employment, housing, education, and public benefits. Most provocatively, she reveals how both the move toward colorblindness and affirmative action may blur our vision of injustice: most Americans know and don't know the truth about mass incarceration—but her carefully researched, deeply engaging, and thoroughly readable book should change that.—Publishers Weekly

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The White Masters of the World

From The World and Africa, 1965

By W. E. B. Du Bois

W. E. B. Du Bois’ Arraignment and Indictment of White Civilization (Fletcher)

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Ancient African Nations

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Negro Digest / Black World

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Enjoy!

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The Death of Emmett Till by Bob Dylan  The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll  Only a Pawn in Their Game

Rev. Jesse Lee Peterson Thanks America for Slavery / George Jackson  / Hurricane Carter

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The Journal of Negro History issues at Project Gutenberg

The Haitian Declaration of Independence 1804  / January 1, 1804 -- The Founding of Haiti 

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update 24 November 2011

 

 

 

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Related files:  Benjamin E. Mays Speaks Review   Mays Speaks Review