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These rooms or chapters may naturally share common walls and

ideas which Dr. Rose Ure Mezu purposefully uses to reinforce the unit

 rather than repeat or duplicate parts of the whole. The reader of Chinua

Achebe: The Man and His Works can therefore end with

the beginning or begin with the end . . .

 

 

 Other Books by Rose Ure Mezu

Women in Chains: Abandonment in Love Relationships in the Fiction of Selected West African Writers (1994) / Songs of the Hearth (1993) /

Homage to My People (2004) / A History of Africana Women's Literature (2004)

 Black Nationalists: Reconsidering Du Bois, Garvey, Booker T. & Nkrumah (1999) Chinua Achebe: The Man and His Works (2006)

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Books by Chinua Achebe

Things Fall Apart Arrow of God / No Longer at Ease  / A Man of the People / Anthills of the Savannah

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Chinua Achebe: The Man and His Works

By Rose Ure Mezu

 

Preface

to Chinua Achebe: The Man and His Works (2006)

The several novels of Chinua Achebe can stand alone and can be read, appreciated, and studied in isolation. They also can form an integrated corpus some progressing either spatially, historically, and genealogically from one to the other. The chapters that form Chinua Achebe: The Man and His Works by Rose Ure Mezu can be viewed and read in much the same way as Achebe’s novels. Each chapter while forming part of a whole can stand in isolation and on its own.

The work is not a novel to be read from the beginning to the end but should be seen as rooms with separate and connecting doors in a house each designed with a specific purpose in mind, sufficient unto itself yet forming part of the whole. These rooms or chapters may naturally share common walls and ideas which Dr. Rose Ure Mezu purposefully uses to reinforce the unit rather than repeat or duplicate parts of the whole. The reader of Chinua Achebe: The Man and His Works can therefore end with the beginning or begin with the end chapter or simply move into the central chapter or living room and from there explore the house that Chinua Achebe built, or better still try to climb the iroko tree that Achebe planted with its foundations rooted in pre-colonial Africa and its branches extending to the diaspora.

Dr. Rose Ure Mezu, in this work, inaugurates a new tradition, juxtaposing Achebe’s thoughts and concepts and those of diasporan literary and cultural groundbreakers such as Olaudah Equiano (The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano or Gustavus Vassa, the African, Written by Himself, 1789) and Zora Neale Hurston (Their Eyes Are Watching God, 1937). Equiano’s work has lately become the focus of some controversies by some people who are neither Igbos nor inhabitants of Essaka. These people question, out of ignorance, the authenticity of Equiano’s place of birth. Without setting out to do so, Mezu in Chinua Achebe: The Man and His Works has presented veritably a defense of the truth about Igbo / African culture and Equiano’s recollection of it. As pointed out in this work and as established by Cheikh Anta Diop and other scholars, Africa was not and is not culturally, socially, and technologically a tabula rasa.

Literature brings the world together, interlocks human experience and brings out the universal in the individual experience. Chinua Achebe in extolling the individual succeeded in celebrating humanity with his works and now Dr. Rose Ure Mezu has celebrated in this work the humanity of Chinua Achebe. It reads almost like a novel and certainly one would hope there will be a sequel to this volume.

Dr. S. Okechukwu Mezu

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Table of Contents

Preface  

viii

     
 Introduction  

 x

     
Chapter 1 Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart: Implications for Black Cultural Nationalism and Revisionism 

16

     
Chapter 2 Achebe’s Arrow of God: Ezeulu and the Limits of Power

37

     
Chapter 3 Conflicts and Notions of Culture and Civilization in No Longer At Ease 

65 

     
Chapter 4 A Man of the People: A Moral Approach

90

     
Chapter 5 Achebe's Anthills of the Savannah: A Writer and his Ideas

121 

     
Chapter 6 Achebe’s Okonkwo and Hurston’s Jody Starks: Twin Souls in Different Climes and Their Women 

147

     
Chapter 7 Achebe’s Writings: An Authentication of the Igbo Culture of Olaudah Equiano’s 1789 Narrative

164

     
Chapter 8 Women in Achebe’s World: A Womanist Critique

210

     
Chapter 9 Conversations with Chinua Achebe, 1996

227

     
Chapter 10 The Mezus Visit with the Achebes: (A second interview, June 15, 1999)

  235

     
Bibliography   

256

   

 

Index  

268

 

Published by Adonis & Abbey Publishers Ltd  http://www.adonis-abbey.com

 

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Chinua Achebe wins $300,000 Gish prizeBy Philip Nwosu—Monday, September 27, 2010—The author of the epic novel, Things Fall Apart, Chinua Achebe, has emerged winner of the United States Dorothy and Lillian Gish Prize. The Gish prize, which was established in 1994 by the Dorothy and Lillian Gish Prize Trust and administered by JPMorgan Chase Bank as trustee, is given annually to “a man or woman who has made an outstanding contribution to the beauty of the world and to mankind’s enjoyment and understanding of life.” The prize is worth $300,000. . . . Achebe’s writings examine African politics and chronicle the ways in which African culture and civilization have survived in the post-colonial world. Some of his acclaimed works include A Man of the People (1966) and Anthills of the Savannah (1988).

[The 80-year-old author has founded a number of magazines for African art, fiction and poetry.] Achebe, who is paralyzed from the waist down due to a 1990 car accident, is currently Professor of Africana Studies at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island.SunNewsOnline

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Again, Chinua Achebe Rejects Nigerian Award—“The reasons for rejecting the offer when it was first made have not been addressed let alone solved. It is inappropriate to offer it again to me. I must therefore regretfully decline the offer again,” Achebe said in the letter which he reportedly sent to Nigeria Ambassador to the United States. Achebe had in 2004 rejected offer of national award from the administration of former President Olusegun Obasanjo in protest of the political situation in Nigeria and his native Anambra State then.

The US based writer had in the rejection letter he wrote to the then President noted that: “I write this letter with a very heavy heart. For some time now I have watched events in Nigeria with alarm and dismay. I have watched particularly the chaos in my own state of Anambra where a small clique of renegades, openly boasting its connections in high places, seems determined to turn my homeland into a bankrupt and lawless fiefdom.  I am appalled by the brazenness of this clique and the silence, if not connivance, of the Presidency.

“Forty three years ago, at the first anniversary of Nigeria’s independence I was given the first Nigerian National Trophy for Literature. In 1979, I received two further honours—the Nigerian National Order of Merit and the Order of the Federal Republic—and in 1999 the first National Creativity Award.

“I accepted all these honours fully aware that Nigeria was not perfect; but I had a strong belief that we would outgrow our shortcomings under leaders committed to uniting our diverse peoples.  Nigeria’s condition today under your watch is, however, too dangerous for silence. I must register my disappointment and protest by declining to accept the high honour awarded me in the 2004 Honours List.”—PMNewsNigeria

posted 21 March 2006

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The Warmth of Other Suns

The Epic Story of America's Great Migration

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Ida Mae Brandon Gladney, a sharecropper's wife, left Mississippi for Milwaukee in 1937, after her cousin was falsely accused of stealing a white man's turkeys and was almost beaten to death. In 1945, George Swanson Starling, a citrus picker, fled Florida for Harlem after learning of the grove owners' plans to give him a "necktie party" (a lynching). Robert Joseph Pershing Foster made his trek from Louisiana to California in 1953, embittered by "the absurdity that he was doing surgery for the United States Army and couldn't operate in his own home town." Anchored to these three stories is Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Wilkerson's magnificent, extensively researched study of the "great migration," the exodus of six million black Southerners out of the terror of Jim Crow to an "uncertain existence" in the North and Midwest.

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Allah, Liberty, and Love

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The White Masters of the World

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Ancient African Nations

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The Death of Emmett Till by Bob Dylan  The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll  Only a Pawn in Their Game

Rev. Jesse Lee Peterson Thanks America for Slavery / George Jackson  / Hurricane Carter

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The Journal of Negro History issues at Project Gutenberg

The Haitian Declaration of Independence 1804  / January 1, 1804 -- The Founding of Haiti 

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update 14 July 2012

 

 

 

Home  Rose Ure Mezu Table

Related Files: Reading Rose Ure  Mezu   Achebe Preface  Achebe Introduction   Mezu and Achebe: An Inside Knowledge     Achebe Another Birthday in Exile 

Banning Chinua Achebe in Kenya  Women in Achebe's World  Okonkwo's Curse  Achebe's Female Characterisation