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Born Frederick Bailey in Talbot County, Douglass came to Fells Point in 1826, about the age of 8.

 There, he learned to read and write and bought his first book. He also worked as a caulker.

 

 

City Unveils First Historical Marker 

in Fells Point to honor Douglass -- 

He lived in neighborhood before escaping slavery

 By Jamil Roberts
 

Baltimore officials signaled yesterday that the city is prepared to officially mark Frederick Douglass' place in local history.

A historical marker honoring Douglass was unveiled yesterday at Fells Point Square, the first of up to six signs that will be erected throughout the area where Douglass lived, worked and prayed.

The marker is scheduled to be replaced with a plaque Sept. 3 - National Frederick Douglass Freedom Day - the day that Douglass escaped from slavery in Baltimore.

"I think the recognition of Frederick Douglass is way overdue," said Mayor Martin O'Malley, who performed the ribbon cutting at the ceremony.

The mayor echoed the sentiments of Baltimore residents who have criticized the city for failing to recognize the contributions of many African-Americans and the city's role in the slave trade.

"I think that the city was embarrassed of its history. Other cities have already had historical markers," said Robert E. Reyes, 46, board member of the Friends of the President Street Station.

For two years, Louis C. Fields lobbied the city to create the memorials. With the help of the Frederick Douglass Organization, founded by Frederick Douglass IV, and tourism groups, Fields hopes to increase African-American tourism in Baltimore.

"This is a realization of a dream," said Fields, president of Black Baltimore Heritage Tours, who helped create the Frederick Douglass Historical Marker Program.

Born Frederick Bailey in Talbot County, Douglass came to Fells Point in 1826, about the age of 8. There, he learned to read and write and bought his first book. He also worked as a caulker.

Posing as a sailor, he escaped from bondage in 1838, taking a train to Philadelphia. He went to New York and then to Massachusetts, where he changed his last name to Douglass and became a preacher, lecturer, writer and activist. He ultimately became an international abolitionist and orator, an ambassador to Haiti and presidential adviser.

Sun Originally published February 22, 2002

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The White Masters of the World

From The World and Africa, 1965

By W. E. B. Du Bois

W. E. B. Du Bois Arraignment and Indictment of White Civilization (Fletcher)

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Ancient African Nations

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Negro Digest / Black World

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The Death of Emmett Till by Bob Dylan  The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll  Only a Pawn in Their Game

Rev. Jesse Lee Peterson Thanks America for Slavery

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The Journal of Negro History issues at Project Gutenberg

The Haitian Declaration of Independence 1804  / January 1, 1804 -- The Founding of Haiti 

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update 19 April 2010

 

 

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