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Dimock's photographs . . . do suggest, often quite eloquently,

how black South Carolinians endured, the extraordinary

resourcefulness, spirit, and resiliency they displayed.

 

 

Camera Man's Journey

Julian Dimock's South

Edited by Thomas L. Johnson and Nina J. Root 

 

 

A vivid, moving story wherein the images bring to life unspoken words that strongly remind us that this world of downtrodden and oppressed people whose spirits did not break was never meant to be silent.--Dori Sanders

 

"Dimock destroys myths, stereotypes, and misconceptions with its images of a spirited and persevering people."--Cleveland L. Sellers Jr.

 

"If Dimock's photographs fail to depict the repression and violence that circumscribed black life, they do suggest, often quite eloquently, how black South Carolinians endured, the extraordinary resourcefulness, spirit, and resiliency they displayed."--Leon Litwack

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A poignant collection of 155 photographs, Camera Man's Journey takes us to a place at once familiar and foreign. Set in the South early in the twentieth century, these photographs bridge a distance not only of time but also of contrasting attitudes and customs.

 

The images show African Americans in or around Columbia, Beaufort, and Hilton Head, South Carolina. Some photographs were taken in surroundings where blacks might associate with whites--out of necessity and according to strict custom.

Most of the images, however, are set in "colored sections" or other remote areas of town or country where blacks were obliged to fashion lives apart. Under segregation and disenfranchisement, men, women, and children are portrayed in ordinary occupations and pursuits: a peddler selling his wares, a woman tying a toddler's shoes, a barber and his young apprentice taking a break outside their shop.

Julian Dimock, whose works appeared often in major travel and nature magazines, took the photographs in 1904-5. So many photographers of the era tended to romanticize or politicize their African-American subjects; Dimock was different. Signs of want and inequity are plain to see in these images, but Dimock portrays his subjects as they reall were in all of their dignity, strength, and beauty.-- Georgia Book News

 

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Julian Dimock (1873-1945) was born in New Jersey and traveled widely across the United States, taking photographs on his own and as part of many scientific and sporting expeditions. The fifth of six children, Julian Anthony Dimock was the son of Anthony and Helen Weston Dimock, only two of their children survived to adulthood.

Dimock abruptly ended his photography career in 1917 upon the death of his father, whom as a writer, was also his frequent traveling companion and collaborator. Dimock went on to become a highly regarded orchardist, planting 1600 trees and  an exponent of conservation.

According to Nina J. Root: "He was instrumental in developing the seed potato as an important Vermont crop and also participated in the state's reforesting project of planting red and Scotch pines. he served as town auditor for sixteen years and was know as the best apple grower in the area. Today his farm is still known as the "Dimock Orchard."

 

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Table of Contents

Foreword (Dori Sanders)
Preface (Cleveland L. Sellers Jr.)
Acknowledgments (Nina J. Root and Thomas L. Johnson)
Julian Dimock: Reluctant Camera Man (Nina J. Root)
Mr. Smalls's and Mr. Dimock's South Carolina (Thomas L. Johnson)
JULIAN DIMOCK'S PHOTOGRAPHS
Afterword (Leon F. Litwack)
Bibliography
About the Authors

Contributors:

Thomas L. Johnson has been a field archivist associated for more than twenty-five years with the South Caroliniana Library at the University of South Carolina, where for many years he also taught a course on South Carolina writers. A True Likeness, a book he co-edited on the work of black photographer Richard Samuel Roberts of Columbia (1880-1936), won a Lillian Smith Award from the Southern Regional Council in 1986. He has won prizes for both his poetry and his short fiction, and he serves as an honorary life member on the board of governors of the South Carolina Academy of Authors.

Leon F. Litwack, the Alexander F. and May T. Morrison Professor of American History at the University of California, Berkeley, has been the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, two Distinguished Teaching Awards, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Film Grant. His book Been in the Storm So Long (1979), an account of America's experience with emanicipation, won the Pulitzer Prize in history and the Parkman Prize. The late C. Vann Woodward called its 1998 sequel, Trouble in the Mind, "the most complete and moving account we have had of what the victims of the Jim Crow South suffered and somehow endured."

Nina J. Root, a native New Yorker, received her bachelor's degree at Hunter College and a master's degree from Pratt Institute. She served as Director of Library Services at the American Museum of Natural History for twenty-seven years. Before coming to the museum she was head of Reference, Science and Technology Division, Library of Congress, where she was given a Meritorious Service Award. She is the author of numerous books and articles on the history of natural history and on the Library's collections. Today she holds the title of Director Emerita of the AMNH Library and continues to work with collections, lecture, write, and travel.

Dori Sanders, a peach farmer from York County, South Carolina, saw her first novel, Clover (1990), published to immediate critical and popular acclaim. It received a Lillian Smith Award, has gone into ten hardback printings and numerous paperback ones, has been translated into five foreign languages, and was made into a major Walt Disney Film. Another novel, Her Own Story, appeared in 1993, and Dori Sanders' Country Cooking, in 1995. Her work has been characterized as "Southern writing at its best" and has been compared to that of Alice Walker, Maya Angelou, and Zora Neale Hurston.

Cleveland L. Sellers Jr. is director of the African American Studies Program at the University of South Carolina, where he also teaches in the History Department. The River of No Return: The Autobiography of a Black Militant and the Life and Death of SNCC, published in collaboration with Robert Terrell in 1973 and in a 1990 edition with an afterword by Sellers, is his insider's account of the rise and fall of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee and of his involvement in the 1968 Orangeburg Massacre, including his arrest and subsequent imprisonment.

It is considered one of the two or three most important books to have come out of the Civil Rights Movement

Camera Man's Journey The University of Georgia Press-330 Research Drive-Athens, Georgia 30602-4901

 

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Thomas L. Johnson has been a field archivist for more than twenty-five years with the South Carolinian Library at the University of South Carolina. His 1986 book, A True Likeness, coedited with Phillip C. Dunn, won a coveted Lillian Smith Award from the Southern Regional Council.

Nina J. Root is Director Emerita of the Research Library at the American Museum of Natural History, where, among other accomplishments, she cataloged the Julian Dimock photograph collection.

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AALBC.com's 25 Best Selling Books


 

Fiction

#1 - Justify My Thug by Wahida Clark
#2 - Flyy Girl by Omar Tyree
#3 - Head Bangers: An APF Sexcapade by Zane
#4 - Life Is Short But Wide by J. California Cooper
#5 - Stackin' Paper 2 Genesis' Payback by Joy King
#6 - Thug Lovin' (Thug 4) by Wahida Clark
#7 - When I Get Where I'm Going by Cheryl Robinson
#8 - Casting the First Stone by Kimberla Lawson Roby
#9 - The Sex Chronicles: Shattering the Myth by Zane

#10 - Covenant: A Thriller  by Brandon Massey

#11 - Diary Of A Street Diva  by Ashley and JaQuavis

#12 - Don't Ever Tell  by Brandon Massey

#13 - For colored girls who have considered suicide  by Ntozake Shange

#14 - For the Love of Money : A Novel by Omar Tyree

#15 - Homemade Loves  by J. California Cooper

#16 - The Future Has a Past: Stories by J. California Cooper

#17 - Player Haters by Carl Weber

#18 - Purple Panties: An Eroticanoir.com Anthology by Sidney Molare

#19 - Stackin' Paper by Joy King

#20 - Children of the Street: An Inspector Darko Dawson Mystery by Kwei Quartey

#21 - The Upper Room by Mary Monroe

#22 – Thug Matrimony  by Wahida Clark

#23 - Thugs And The Women Who Love Them by Wahida Clark

#24 - Married Men by Carl Weber

#25 - I Dreamt I Was in Heaven - The Rampage of the Rufus Buck Gang by Leonce Gaiter

Non-fiction

#1 - Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention by Manning Marable
#2 - Confessions of a Video Vixen by Karrine Steffans
#3 - Dear G-Spot: Straight Talk About Sex and Love by Zane
#4 - Letters to a Young Brother: MANifest Your Destiny by Hill Harper
#5 - Peace from Broken Pieces: How to Get Through What You're Going Through by Iyanla Vanzant
#6 - Selected Writings and Speeches of Marcus Garvey by Marcus Garvey
#7 - The Ebony Cookbook: A Date with a Dish by Freda DeKnight
#8 - The Isis Papers: The Keys to the Colors by Frances Cress Welsing
#9 - The Mis-Education of the Negro by Carter Godwin Woodson

#10 - John Henrik Clarke and the Power of Africana History  by Ahati N. N. Toure

#11 - Fail Up: 20 Lessons on Building Success from Failure by Tavis Smiley

#12 -The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander

#13 - The Black Male Handbook: A Blueprint for Life by Kevin Powell

#14 - The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates by Wes Moore

#15 - Why Men Fear Marriage: The Surprising Truth Behind Why So Many Men Can't Commit  by RM Johnson

#16 - Black Titan: A.G. Gaston and the Making of a Black American Millionaire by Carol Jenkins

#17 - Brainwashed: Challenging the Myth of Black Inferiority by Tom Burrell

#18 - A New Earth: Awakening to Your Life's Purpose by Eckhart Tolle

#19 - John Oliver Killens: A Life of Black Literary Activism by Keith Gilyard

#20 - Alain L. Locke: The Biography of a Philosopher by Leonard Harris

#21 - Age Ain't Nothing but a Number: Black Women Explore Midlife by Carleen Brice

#22 - 2012 Guide to Literary Agents by Chuck Sambuchino
#23 - Chicken Soup for the Prisoner's Soul by Tom Lagana
#24 - 101 Things Every Boy/Young Man of Color Should Know by LaMarr Darnell Shields

#25 - Beyond the Black Lady: Sexuality and the New African American Middle Class  by Lisa B. Thompson

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Blacks in Hispanic Literature: Critical Essays

Edited by Miriam DeCosta-Willis 

Blacks in Hispanic Literature is a collection of fourteen essays by scholars and creative writers from Africa and the Americas. Called one of two significant critical works on Afro-Hispanic literature to appear in the late 1970s, it includes the pioneering studies of Carter G. Woodson and Valaurez B. Spratlin, published in the 1930s, as well as the essays of scholars whose interpretations were shaped by the Black aesthetic. The early essays, primarily of the Black-as-subject in Spanish medieval and Golden Age literature, provide an historical context for understanding 20th-century creative works by African-descended, Hispanophone writers, such as Cuban Nicolás Guillén and Ecuadorean poet, novelist, and scholar Adalberto Ortiz, whose essay analyzes the significance of Negritude in Latin America.

This collaborative text set the tone for later conferences in which writers and scholars worked together to promote, disseminate, and critique the literature of Spanish-speaking people of African descent. . . . Cited by a literary critic in 2004 as "the seminal study in the field of Afro-Hispanic Literature . . . on which most scholars in the field 'cut their teeth'."

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Age of Silver: Encounters with Great Photographers

By John Loengard

Age of Silver is iconic American photographer John Loengard’s ode to the art form to which he dedicated his life. Loengard, a longtime staff photographer and editor for LIFE magazine and other publications, spent years documenting modern life for the benefit of the American public. Over the years he trained his camera on dignitaries, artists, athletes, intellectuals, blue and whitecollar workers, urban and natural landscapes, manmade objects, and people of all types engaged in the act of living. In Age of Silver, Loengard gathers his portraits of some of the most important photographers of the last half-century, including Annie Leibovitz, Ansel Adams, Man Ray, Richard Avedon, Alfred Eisenstaedt, Henri Cartier-Bresson, and many, many others. Loengard caught them at home and in the studio; posed portraits and candid shots of the artists at work and at rest.   Complimenting these revealing, expertly composed portraits are elegant photographs of the artists holding their favorite or most revered negatives. This extra dimension to the project offers an inside peek at the artistic process and is a stark reminder of the physicality of the photographic practice at a time before the current wave of digital dominance. There is no more honest or faithful reproduction of life existent in the world of image making than original, untouched silver negatives.  

Far from an attempt to put forth a singular definition of modern photographic practice, this beautifully printed, duotone monograph instead presents evidence of the unique vision and extremely personal style of every artist pictured. Annie Leibovitz is quoted in her caption as once saying, “I am always perplexed when people say that a photograph has captured someone. A photograph is just a piece of them in a moment. It seems presumptuous to think you can get more than that.”PowerhouseBooks

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The River of No Return

The Autobiography of a Black Militant and the Life and Death of SNCC

By Cleveland Sellers with Robert Terrell

Among histories of the civil rights movement of the 1960s there are few personal narratives better than this one. Besides being an insider's account of the rise and fall of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, it is an eyewitness report of the strategies and the conflicts in the crucial battle zones as the fight for racial justice raged across the South.  This memoir by Cleveland Sellers, a SNCC volunteer, traces his zealous commitment to activism from the time of the sit-ins, demonstrations, and freedom rides in the early '60s. In a narrative encompassing the Mississippi Freedom Summer (1964), the historic march in Selma, the Democratic National Convention in Atlantic City, and the murders of civil rights activists in Mississippi, he recounts the turbulent history of SNCC and tells the powerful story of his own no-return dedication to the cause of civil rights and social change.

The River of No Return is acclaimed as a book that is destined to become a standard text for those wishing to perceive the civil rights struggle from within the ranks of one of its key organizations and to note the divisive history of the movement as groups striving for common goals were embroiled in conflict and controversy.

*   *   *   *   *

The Shadows of Youth

The Remarkable Journey of the Civil Rights Generation

By Andrew B. Lewis

With deep admiration and rigorous scholarship, historian Lewis (Gonna Sit at the Welcome Table) revisits the ragtag band of young men and women who formed the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. Impatient with what they considered the overly cautious and accommodating pace of the NAACP and Martin Luther King Jr., the black college students and their white allies, inspired by Gandhi's principles of nonviolence and moral integrity, risked their lives to challenge a deeply entrenched system. Fanning out over the Jim Crow South, SNCC organized sit-ins, voter registration drives, Freedom Schools and protest marches. Despite early successes, the movement disintegrated in the late 1960s, succeeded by the militant Black Power movement. The highly readable history follows the later careers of the principal leaders. Some, like Stokely Carmichael and H. Rap Brown, became bitter and disillusioned.

Others, including Marion Barry, Julian Bond and John Lewis, tempered their idealism and moved from protest to politics, assuming positions of leadership within the very institutions they had challenged. According to the author, No organization contributed more to the civil rights movement than SNCC, and with his eloquent book, he offers a deserved tribute.—Publishers Weekly

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Michelle Alexander: US Prisons, The New Jim Crow  / Judge Mathis Weighs in on the execution of Troy Davis

The New Jim Crow

Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness 

By Michelle Alexander

The mass incarceration of people of color through the War on Drugs is a big part of the reason that a black child born today is less likely to be raised by both parents than a black child born during slavery. The absence of black fathers from families across America is not simply a function of laziness, immaturity, or too much time watching Sports Center. Hundreds of thousands of black men have disappeared into prisons and jails, locked away for drug crimes that are largely ignored when committed by whites. Most people seem to imagine that the drug war—which has swept millions of poor people of color behind bars—has been aimed at rooting out drug kingpins or violent drug offenders. Nothing could be further from the truth. This war has been focused overwhelmingly on low-level drug offenses, like marijuana possession—the very crimes that happen with equal frequency in middle class white communities.

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The White Masters of the World

From The World and Africa, 1965

By W. E. B. Du Bois

W. E. B. Du Bois’ Arraignment and Indictment of White Civilization (Fletcher)

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Ancient African Nations

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The Death of Emmett Till by Bob Dylan  The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll  Only a Pawn in Their Game

Rev. Jesse Lee Peterson Thanks America for Slavery / George Jackson  / Hurricane Carter

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The Journal of Negro History issues at Project Gutenberg

The Haitian Declaration of Independence 1804  / January 1, 1804 -- The Founding of Haiti 

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update 20 July 2012

 

 

 

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Related files: Ernest Withers  / Carrie Mae Weems  /  Julian Dimock  / Jerry Taliaferro  / Spring Ulmer   J. Nash Porter  / The Willie Harris Collection  /  Eugene Redmond