ChickenBones: A Journal

for Literary & Artistic African-American Themes

   

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 Although 65% to 70% Black, New Orleans had a rich mix of people. For example,

one of, if not the largest community of Hondurans outside of Honduras was located

in the greater New Orleans area. Over 12,000 Vietnamese lived in New Orleans

 

 

Books by Kalamu ya Salaam

 

The Magic of JuJu: An Appreciation of the Black Arts Movement  /   360: A Revolution of Black Poets

Everywhere Is Someplace Else: A Literary Anthology  /  From A Bend in the River: 100 New Orleans Poets

Our Music Is No Accident   /  What Is Life: Reclaiming the Black Blues Self

My Story My Song (CD)

 

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LISTEN TO THE PEOPLE
The Neo-Griot New Orleans Project

Listen to the People Update: Give Thanks

 

29 November 2005

Never say die.

There is a lot of confusion as to what will happen to New Orleans, but the New Orleans “never say die” spirit is shining brightly through the fog. As we travel around the country interviewing people, it is clear that New Orleans is special. New Orleans culture remains strong even to those natives who were not living in the city when Katrina hit.

Listen To The People is both an important and inspiring project. It is important that we record and share our voices. Experiencing the cultural strength of Katrina survivors is inspirational, both for those who want to return as well as those who may never return.

Listen To The People is now moving into Phase Two. We have moved beyond an idea. We are recording interviews. Our website (www.kalamu.com/listen) is up and running. We are developing long-term partnerships. We have received a seed grant of $10,000.


Interviews
Thus far, we have done the following video interviews:

Adrinda Kelly (18 minutes) – New Orleans native, graduate of McDonogh #35 high school and Harvard University. She was one of the first students to participate in the Students at the Center (SAC) program. She lives and works in New York City as an editor at McGraw Hill Publishing. Adrinda is the director of publications for SAC.
Interviewed: New York City

Niyi and Kemi Osundare (2.5 hours) – Nigerian nationals who were living and working in New Orleans. Niyi is an internationally respected poet and English Professor who was teaching at the University of New Orleans. Kemi is a social worker and nurse who was working at Charity Hospital in New Orleans. After nearly drowning, they were evacuated to Birmingham, and ended up at Franklin Pierce College in Rindge, New Hampshire.
Interviewed: Rindge, New Hampshire

Maria Hernandez (3 hours) – Maria is a New Orleans-born, 16-year-old, Afro-Cuban (her parents are from Cuba). She was a senior at Frederick Douglass high school in New Orleans and a SAC student for three years. Maria was in the Superdome during Katrina. Evacuated to Tulsa, Oklahoma. Interviewed: Clemson, South Carolina

John Scott (45 minutes) – John is a New Orleans native, visual artist and MacArthur awardee who evacuated the city shortly before Katrina hit and is now living in Houston. John Scott taught at Xavier for over 30 years. Interviewed: Houston, Texas

Towana Pierre (1 hour) – Towana is a New Orleans native, Students at the Center (SAC) graduate from McDonogh #35 high school and Howard University graduate who is now teaching 7th grade reading in Houston, Texas. Towana was teaching at Abramson High School in New Orleans when Katrina hit. Evacuated to Vicksburg, Mississippi.
Interviewed: Houston, Texas

Jarvis DeBerry (3 hours) – Jarvis is a Mississippi born columnist & editorial writer for the Times Picayune (New Orleans’ daily newspaper). Jarvis evacuated New Orleans two days after Katrina hit. Shortly thereafter, Jarvis returned to New Orleans and is now living in New Orleans. Interviewed: New Orleans

Mary Shelbia (I hour) – Mary, a New Orleans native and parent of SAC high school student, spent five days on an expressway during Katrina and was then evacuated to San Antonio, Texas. Interviewed: Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Kenneth Ferdinand (3 hours) – Kenneth and his wife Melba are the proprietors of Café Rose Nicaud in New Orleans. He is a New Orleans native and survivor of Hurricane Betsy in 1965. Kenneth and Melba evacuated for Hurricane Katrina to St. Francisville, Louisiana but quickly returned and were the first business owners to reopen in the Faubourg Marigny area of the city. Interviewed: New Orleans

Ukali Mwendo (2 hours) – Ukali is a firefighter with the New Orleans Fire Department and a long standing community activist. He was on duty in New Orleans throughout Katrina. Interview: New Orleans

Jose Torres Tama (3 hours) – Jose is a performance artist, visual artist and arts activist, born in Ecuador, South America, reared in the New York/New Jersey/Connnecticut tri-borough area, and spent the last half of 44 years in his adopted home of New Orleans. Jose rode out Katrina and evacuated from the city on the Wednesday night after Katrina hit. Interview: New Orleans

So far, the interviews are going extremely well. I have about four or five more I plan to complete before the end of the year.

Rohn Barras, who is a member of the Neo-Griot Writing Workshop, is also conducting interviews. Rohn is in Houston and has gathered stories in Houston and in New Orleans. She is working on her Masters in Anthropology from Clark-Atlanta. Her interviews focus on cultural memory. We plan to audio stream some of Rhon’s interviews.

Our immediate goal is to stream video and audio interview excerpts on the Listen to the People website (www.kalamu.com/listen) beginning New Year's 2006.

I am also working on a book project with Lola Vollens of Berkeley, CA who is the creator of a series of oral histories called Voice Of Witness. She is currently putting together the latest volume, an oral history of Hurricane Katrina survivors. More on this project as I get more details.

From survivors telling stories to those who just want to help, people across the nation are supportive of our project. The fiduciary agent for Listen To The People is The Renaissance Project, a New Orleans community development organization.

Because conditions in New Orleans, including mail delivery, remain unreliable, The Renaissance Project has an office at the Strom Thurmond Institute at Clemson University. Until New Orleans is stable, all of our financial business will be conducted through the Clemson office.

Donations to Listen To The People may be sent to:

The Renaissance Project
Strom Thurmond Institute
Clemson University
Clemson, SC 29634

All checks and money orders should be made payable to “The Renaissance Project” with a notation “Listen To The People” on the memo line of the check or money order.

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building the database of volunteers 

15 September 2005

This project is designed to document, archive, and share the life experiences of New Orleanians. While we will focus on Katrina-related events, we plan to include selected life stories.

Although 65% to 70% Black, New Orleans had a rich mix of people. For example, one of, if not the largest community of Hondurans outside of Honduras was located in the greater New Orleans area. Over 12,000 Vietnamese lived in New Orleans, principally in New Orleans East, which was entirely flooded. Additionally, the adjoining parishes (counties) of St. Bernard and Plaquemines contained large populations of poor whites. Listen To The People will focus on Black residents, but we will not disappear or ignore other ethnicities and races who lived in the New Orleans area. All voices will be included.

Listen To The People contains three activity levels: 1. existing material, 2. field recordings from writers and interested individuals, and 3. intensive video interviews.

These three levels are designed to offer the maximum opportunity for everyone to participate in building this people-based communications program.

1. Existing Material.
Listen To The People will identify, gather, archive and index existing Katrina-experience documentation. While we do not plan to index every newspaper account, we do want to archive features that focused on first hand experiences, including letters to the editors, op ed pieces, features, audio and video interviews.

We encourage people to send us material in whatever form it may be avaialbe: print, electronic (including physical media such as cassette tape, mini-dv tape, cd reproduction, etc.) as well as internet references. We are particularly interested in receiving material in digital formats.

2. Field Recordings.
The New Orleans Diaspora is spread far and wide across the United States. Writers, activists, or individuals who want to participate are encouraged to record the experiences of evacuees. Although digital formats are desired, analog cassette recordings are acceptable. The important point is to make sure the interviews are clearly recorded.

3. Video Interviews.
The Neo-Griot media crew will conduct in depth interviews with selected individuals. Some of these interviewees will be selected from the “existing material” and the “field recordings” areas of Listen To The People.

This project will work in cooperation with Students at the Center and Douglass Crossroads. Students at the Center is an independent writing program that functioned within the New Orleans public schools over the last ten years. Douglass Crossroads is part of a national initiative at high school reform and improvement, based out of Frederick Douglass High School, located in the ninth ward of New Orleans.

Once the material and interviews are gathered, they will be archived, indexed and listed on the Listen To The People website. Selected interviews will be available as streaming audio and downloadable mp3s. A smaller selection of video interviews will be streamed online.

All interviews will remain the intellectual property of the witnesses and may not be used for any commercial purpose without the written concept of the interviewee (or their guardians).

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Listen To The People

using digital technology to document and share a people’s history from New Orleans
Kalamu ya Salaam / c/o Joseph McCoy / 8222 White Chapel Court / Brentwood, TN 37027 / 
504/710-9694 / kalamu.salaam@gmail.com

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kalamu travel update -- building the database of volunteers (9/15/05)
==========================

although the following dates are subject to modification, excepted where noted otherwide, they are confirmed. i invite and encourage e-drummers to attend when they can. please make yourself known to me. i would like to meet as many e-drummers as possible.

these speaking engagements are our main support at this time and are especially important for our listen to the people project. we are not simply looking for money. we need the all around involvement of people. because this is a digital-based project, it will be possible to parcel out sections of each task. because new orleanians have been sent all over the united states, it will be possible for you to participate in a number of different ways.

right now we are building the database of volunteers. as we bring the infrastructure online, we will specify resources needed and specify how people can work on the project from their home, school or office.

we appreciate everyone's input and support. any and all comments are encouraged, we develop best through openness and consensus.

Appearances

kalamu will appear at: cornell university -  sunday, 17 sept - tuesday, 19 sept / nyc - thursday 29 sept - monday, 2 oct / (the bowery poetry club on friday, 30 sept. / the caribbean culture center, 1 oct.) / madison, wisconsin - tuesday, 11 0ct - sunday, 16 oct / m.i.t. - 17 or 18 oct. (tentative) kalamu.salaam@gmail.com

posted 15 September 2005

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Men We Love, Men We Hate
SAC writings from Douglass, McDonogh 35, and McMain high schools in New Orleans.

An anthology on the topic of men and relationships with men

Ways of Laughing
An Anthology of Young Black Voices
Photographed & Edited by
Kalamu ya Salaam

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music website > http://www.kalamu.com/bol/
writing website > http://wordup.posterous.com/
daily blog > http://kalamu.posterous.com
twitter > http://twitter.com/neogriot
facebook > http://www.facebook.com/kalamu.salaam

Guarding the Flame of Life

New Orleans Jazz Funeral for tuba player Kerwin James / They danced atop his casket Jaran 'Julio' Green

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Track List
1.  Congo Square (9:01)
2.  My Story, My Song (20:50)
3.  Danny Banjo (4:32)
4.  Miles Davis (10:26)
5.  Hard News For Hip Harry (5:03)
6.  Unfinished Blues (4:13)
7.  Rainbows Come After The Rain (2:21)/Negroidal Noise (15:53)
8.  Intro (3:59)
9.  The Whole History (3:14)
10.  Negroidal Noise (5:39)
11.  Waving At Ra (1:40)
12.  Landing (1:21)
13.  Good Luck (:04)

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AALBC.com's 25 Best Selling Books


 

Fiction

#1 - Justify My Thug by Wahida Clark
#2 - Flyy Girl by Omar Tyree
#3 - Head Bangers: An APF Sexcapade by Zane
#4 - Life Is Short But Wide by J. California Cooper
#5 - Stackin' Paper 2 Genesis' Payback by Joy King
#6 - Thug Lovin' (Thug 4) by Wahida Clark
#7 - When I Get Where I'm Going by Cheryl Robinson
#8 - Casting the First Stone by Kimberla Lawson Roby
#9 - The Sex Chronicles: Shattering the Myth by Zane

#10 - Covenant: A Thriller  by Brandon Massey

#11 - Diary Of A Street Diva  by Ashley and JaQuavis

#12 - Don't Ever Tell  by Brandon Massey

#13 - For colored girls who have considered suicide  by Ntozake Shange

#14 - For the Love of Money : A Novel by Omar Tyree

#15 - Homemade Loves  by J. California Cooper

#16 - The Future Has a Past: Stories by J. California Cooper

#17 - Player Haters by Carl Weber

#18 - Purple Panties: An Eroticanoir.com Anthology by Sidney Molare

#19 - Stackin' Paper by Joy King

#20 - Children of the Street: An Inspector Darko Dawson Mystery by Kwei Quartey

#21 - The Upper Room by Mary Monroe

#22 – Thug Matrimony  by Wahida Clark

#23 - Thugs And The Women Who Love Them by Wahida Clark

#24 - Married Men by Carl Weber

#25 - I Dreamt I Was in Heaven - The Rampage of the Rufus Buck Gang by Leonce Gaiter

Non-fiction

#1 - Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention by Manning Marable
#2 - Confessions of a Video Vixen by Karrine Steffans
#3 - Dear G-Spot: Straight Talk About Sex and Love by Zane
#4 - Letters to a Young Brother: MANifest Your Destiny by Hill Harper
#5 - Peace from Broken Pieces: How to Get Through What You're Going Through by Iyanla Vanzant
#6 - Selected Writings and Speeches of Marcus Garvey by Marcus Garvey
#7 - The Ebony Cookbook: A Date with a Dish by Freda DeKnight
#8 - The Isis Papers: The Keys to the Colors by Frances Cress Welsing
#9 - The Mis-Education of the Negro by Carter Godwin Woodson

#10 - John Henrik Clarke and the Power of Africana History  by Ahati N. N. Toure

#11 - Fail Up: 20 Lessons on Building Success from Failure by Tavis Smiley

#12 -The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander

#13 - The Black Male Handbook: A Blueprint for Life by Kevin Powell

#14 - The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates by Wes Moore

#15 - Why Men Fear Marriage: The Surprising Truth Behind Why So Many Men Can't Commit  by RM Johnson

#16 - Black Titan: A.G. Gaston and the Making of a Black American Millionaire by Carol Jenkins

#17 - Brainwashed: Challenging the Myth of Black Inferiority by Tom Burrell

#18 - A New Earth: Awakening to Your Life's Purpose by Eckhart Tolle

#19 - John Oliver Killens: A Life of Black Literary Activism by Keith Gilyard

#20 - Alain L. Locke: The Biography of a Philosopher by Leonard Harris

#21 - Age Ain't Nothing but a Number: Black Women Explore Midlife by Carleen Brice

#22 - 2012 Guide to Literary Agents by Chuck Sambuchino
#23 - Chicken Soup for the Prisoner's Soul by Tom Lagana
#24 - 101 Things Every Boy/Young Man of Color Should Know by LaMarr Darnell Shields

#25 - Beyond the Black Lady: Sexuality and the New African American Middle Class  by Lisa B. Thompson

*   *   *   *   *

I Must Resist: Bayard Rustin's Life in Letters 

Edited by Michael G. Long

Bayard Rustin has been called the “lost prophet” of the Civil Rights Movement, a master strategist and organizer of the 1963 March on Washington and a deeply influential figure in the life of Martin Luther King Jr. Despite these achievements, Rustin often remained in the background, largely because he was an openly gay man in a fiercely homophobic era. Published on the centennial of his birth, and in anticipation of the 50th anniversary of the historic March on Washington, I Must Resist: Bayard Rustin’s Life in Letters  are his words shining through a collection of more than 150 of Rustin’s letters. His correspondents include major figures of his day — for example, Eleanor Holmes Norton, A. Philip Randolph, Roy Wilkins, Ella Baker and of course, Martin Luther King Jr. “I have file boxes full of Rustin’s letters that I tracked down in archives across the country,” said book editor Michael G. Long.

“The time it took to complete the research was much longer than I had predicted, not just because of the number of letters I had in hand, but also especially because for their high quality. It was incredibly difficult to weed out those letters I really liked but that did not serve the purpose of putting together a publishable narrative of letters. And there are quite a few of those that are topically fascinating but not easily fitting for a narrative.”phillytrib

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Salvage the Bones

A Novel by Jesmyn Ward

On one level, Salvage the Bones is a simple story about a poor black family that’s about to be trashed by one of the most deadly hurricanes in U.S. history. What makes the novel so powerful, though, is the way Ward winds private passions with that menace gathering force out in the Gulf of Mexico. Without a hint of pretension, in the simple lives of these poor people living among chickens and abandoned cars, she evokes the tenacious love and desperation of classical tragedy. The force that pushes back against Katrina’s inexorable winds is the voice of Ward’s narrator, a 14-year-old girl named Esch, the only daughter among four siblings. Precocious, passionate and sensitive, she speaks almost entirely in phrases soaked in her family’s raw land. Everything here is gritty, loamy and alive, as though the very soil were animated. Her brother’s “blood smells like wet hot earth after summer rain. . . . His scalp looks like fresh turned dirt.” Her father’s hands “are like gravel,” while her own hand “slides through his grip like a wet fish,” and a handsome boy’s “muscles jabbered like chickens.” Admittedly, Ward can push so hard on this simile-obsessed style that her paragraphs risk sounding like a compost heap, but this isn’t usually just metaphor for metaphor’s sake.

She conveys something fundamental about Esch’s fluid state of mind: her figurative sense of the world in which all things correspond and connect. She and her brothers live in a ramshackle house steeped in grief since their mother died giving birth to her last child. . . . What remains, what’s salvaged, is something indomitable in these tough siblings, the strength of their love, the permanence of their devotion.WashingtonPost

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The New Jim Crow

Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness

By Michele Alexander

Contrary to the rosy picture of race embodied in Barack Obama's political success and Oprah Winfrey's financial success, legal scholar Alexander argues vigorously and persuasively that [w]e have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it. Jim Crow and legal racial segregation has been replaced by mass incarceration as a system of social control (More African Americans are under correctional control today... than were enslaved in 1850). Alexander reviews American racial history from the colonies to the Clinton administration, delineating its transformation into the war on drugs. She offers an acute analysis of the effect of this mass incarceration upon former inmates who will be discriminated against, legally, for the rest of their lives, denied employment, housing, education, and public benefits.

Most provocatively, she reveals how both the move toward colorblindness and affirmative action may blur our vision of injustice: most Americans know and don't know the truth about mass incarceration—but her carefully researched, deeply engaging, and thoroughly readable book should change that.—Publishers Weekly

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AALBC.com's 25 Best Selling Books


 

Fiction

#1 - Justify My Thug by Wahida Clark
#2 - Flyy Girl by Omar Tyree
#3 - Head Bangers: An APF Sexcapade by Zane
#4 - Life Is Short But Wide by J. California Cooper
#5 - Stackin' Paper 2 Genesis' Payback by Joy King
#6 - Thug Lovin' (Thug 4) by Wahida Clark
#7 - When I Get Where I'm Going by Cheryl Robinson
#8 - Casting the First Stone by Kimberla Lawson Roby
#9 - The Sex Chronicles: Shattering the Myth by Zane

#10 - Covenant: A Thriller  by Brandon Massey

#11 - Diary Of A Street Diva  by Ashley and JaQuavis

#12 - Don't Ever Tell  by Brandon Massey

#13 - For colored girls who have considered suicide  by Ntozake Shange

#14 - For the Love of Money : A Novel by Omar Tyree

#15 - Homemade Loves  by J. California Cooper

#16 - The Future Has a Past: Stories by J. California Cooper

#17 - Player Haters by Carl Weber

#18 - Purple Panties: An Eroticanoir.com Anthology by Sidney Molare

#19 - Stackin' Paper by Joy King

#20 - Children of the Street: An Inspector Darko Dawson Mystery by Kwei Quartey

#21 - The Upper Room by Mary Monroe

#22 – Thug Matrimony  by Wahida Clark

#23 - Thugs And The Women Who Love Them by Wahida Clark

#24 - Married Men by Carl Weber

#25 - I Dreamt I Was in Heaven - The Rampage of the Rufus Buck Gang by Leonce Gaiter

Non-fiction

#1 - Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention by Manning Marable
#2 - Confessions of a Video Vixen by Karrine Steffans
#3 - Dear G-Spot: Straight Talk About Sex and Love by Zane
#4 - Letters to a Young Brother: MANifest Your Destiny by Hill Harper
#5 - Peace from Broken Pieces: How to Get Through What You're Going Through by Iyanla Vanzant
#6 - Selected Writings and Speeches of Marcus Garvey by Marcus Garvey
#7 - The Ebony Cookbook: A Date with a Dish by Freda DeKnight
#8 - The Isis Papers: The Keys to the Colors by Frances Cress Welsing
#9 - The Mis-Education of the Negro by Carter Godwin Woodson

#10 - John Henrik Clarke and the Power of Africana History  by Ahati N. N. Toure

#11 - Fail Up: 20 Lessons on Building Success from Failure by Tavis Smiley

#12 -The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander

#13 - The Black Male Handbook: A Blueprint for Life by Kevin Powell

#14 - The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates by Wes Moore

#15 - Why Men Fear Marriage: The Surprising Truth Behind Why So Many Men Can't Commit  by RM Johnson

#16 - Black Titan: A.G. Gaston and the Making of a Black American Millionaire by Carol Jenkins

#17 - Brainwashed: Challenging the Myth of Black Inferiority by Tom Burrell

#18 - A New Earth: Awakening to Your Life's Purpose by Eckhart Tolle

#19 - John Oliver Killens: A Life of Black Literary Activism by Keith Gilyard

#20 - Alain L. Locke: The Biography of a Philosopher by Leonard Harris

#21 - Age Ain't Nothing but a Number: Black Women Explore Midlife by Carleen Brice

#22 - 2012 Guide to Literary Agents by Chuck Sambuchino
#23 - Chicken Soup for the Prisoner's Soul by Tom Lagana
#24 - 101 Things Every Boy/Young Man of Color Should Know by LaMarr Darnell Shields

#25 - Beyond the Black Lady: Sexuality and the New African American Middle Class  by Lisa B. Thompson

*   *   *   *   *

Life on Mars

By Tracy K. Smith

Tracy K. Smith, author of Life on Mars has been selected as the winner of the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. In its review of the book, Publishers Weekly noted the collection's "lyric brilliance" and "political impulses [that] never falter." A New York Times review stated, "Smith is quick to suggest that the important thing is not to discover whether or not we're alone in the universe; it's to accept—or at least endure—the universe's mystery. . . . Religion, science, art: we turn to them for answers, but the questions persist, especially in times of grief. Smith's pairing of the philosophically minded poems in the book’s first section with the long elegy for her father in the second is brilliant." Life on Mars follows Smith's 2007 collection, Duende, which won the James Laughlin Award from the Academy of American Poets, the only award for poetry in the United States given to support a poet's second book, and the first Essence Literary Award for poetry, which recognizes the literary achievements of African Americans. The Body’s Question (2003) was her first published collection.

Smith said Life on Mars, published by small Minnesota press Graywolf, was inspired in part by her father, who was an engineer on the Hubble space telescope and died in 2008.

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Malcolm X

A Life of Reinvention

By Manning Marable

Years in the making-the definitive biography of the legendary black activist.

Of the great figure in twentieth-century American history perhaps none is more complex and controversial than Malcolm X. Constantly rewriting his own story, he became a criminal, a minister, a leader, and an icon, all before being felled by assassins' bullets at age thirty-nine. Through his tireless work and countless speeches he empowered hundreds of thousands of black Americans to create better lives and stronger communities while establishing the template for the self-actualized, independent African American man. In death he became a broad symbol of both resistance and reconciliation for millions around the world.

Manning Marable's new biography of Malcolm is a stunning achievement. Filled with new information and shocking revelations that go beyond the Autobiography, Malcolm X unfolds a sweeping story of race and class in America, from the rise of Marcus Garvey and the Ku Klux Klan to the struggles of the civil rights movement in the fifties and sixties.

Reaching into Malcolm's troubled youth, it traces a path from his parents' activism through his own engagement with the Nation of Islam, charting his astronomical rise in the world of Black Nationalism and culminating in the never-before-told true story of his assassination. Malcolm X will stand as the definitive work on one of the most singular forces for social change, capturing with revelatory clarity a man who constantly strove, in the great American tradition, to remake himself anew.

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Ratification

The People Debate the Constitution, 1787-1788

By Pauline Maier

A notable historian of the early republic, Maier devoted a decade to studying the immense documentation of the ratification of the Constitution. Scholars might approach her book’s footnotes first, but history fans who delve into her narrative will meet delegates to the state conventions whom most history books, absorbed with the Founders, have relegated to obscurity. Yet, prominent in their local counties and towns, they influenced a convention’s decision to accept or reject the Constitution. Their biographies and democratic credentials emerge in Maier’s accounts of their elections to a convention, the political attitudes they carried to the conclave, and their declamations from the floor. The latter expressed opponents’ objections to provisions of the Constitution, some of which seem anachronistic (election regulation raised hackles) and some of which are thoroughly contemporary (the power to tax individuals directly). —Booklist

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Race, Incarceration, and American Values

By Glenn C. Loury

In this pithy discussion, renowned scholars debate the American penal system through the lens—and as a legacy—of an ugly and violent racial past. Economist Loury argues that incarceration rises even as crime rates fall because we have become increasingly punitive. According to Loury, the disproportionately black and brown prison populations are the victims of civil rights opponents who successfully moved the country's race dialogue to a seemingly race-neutral concern over crime. Loury's claims are well-supported with genuinely shocking statistics, and his argument is compelling that even if the racial argument about causes is inconclusive, the racial consequences are clear.

Three shorter essays respond: Stanford law professor Karlan examines prisoners as an inert ballast in redistricting and voting practices; French sociologist Wacquant argues that the focus on race has ignored the fact that inmates are first and foremost poor people; and Harvard philosophy professor

Shelby urges citizens to break with Washington's political outlook on race. The group's respectful sparring results in an insightful look at the conflicting theories of race and incarceration, and the slim volume keeps up the pace of the argument without being overwhelming.—Publishers Weekly

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The White Masters of the World

From The World and Africa, 1965

By W. E. B. Du Bois

W. E. B. Du Bois’ Arraignment and Indictment of White Civilization (Fletcher)

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Ancient African Nations

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Negro Digest / Black World

Browse all issues


1950        1960        1965        1970        1975        1980        1985        1990        1995        2000 ____ 2005        

Enjoy!

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The Death of Emmett Till by Bob Dylan  The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll  Only a Pawn in Their Game

Rev. Jesse Lee Peterson Thanks America for Slavery / George Jackson  / Hurricane Carter

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The Journal of Negro History issues at Project Gutenberg

The Haitian Declaration of Independence 1804  / January 1, 1804 -- The Founding of Haiti 

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update 17 January 2012

 

 

 

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Related files:  Listen To The People  I WANT TO BUT I DON'T    Kalamu Update  Kalamu Needs Work  /  quick notes from the field /   Neo-Griot Workshop / All Hands on Deck