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What would Martin Luther King Jr. say to George W. Bush about publicly calling

for regime change in Iraq after stealing the election of 2000 in AmeriKKKa? What would King say to the cowardly and immoral U.S. Congress about their limp and non-existent opposition to the concept of pre-emptive strikes and use of nuclear weapons?

 

 

Books by and about Martin Luther King, Jr.

The Autobiography of Martin Luther King, Jr. Strength to Love / The Measure of a Man Why We Can't Wait

A Testament of Hope  /  A Knock at Midnight   /  The Papers of  Martin Luther King, Jr., 1948-1963

 

Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community Stride Toward Freedom: The Montgomery Story

 

Behind the Dream: The Making of the Speech that Transformed a Nation

 

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What Would 

Martin Luther King Jr. Say and Do?

By Junious Ricardo Stanton 

 

On some positions, cowardice asks the question, 'is it safe?' Expediency asks the question, 'is it politic?' Vanity asks the question, 'is it popular?' But conscious asks the question 'is it right?' And then comes a time when a true follower of Jesus Christ must take a stand that's neither safe, nor politic, nor popular but he must take that stand because it is right.Martin Luther King Jr.

 

As we celebrate the birthday and legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. let us pause and make the connection between what he stood for, what he dedicated his life to and resolving if what he stood for and dedicated his life for is worth celebrating, shouldn't we do likewise. If not then we might as well stop saying we are honoring him, his life and legacy and shut up. The monopoly media likes to bombard us with the sound byte of Martin Luther King Jr. "I have a Dream" speech, the part where he talks about all men living together, but they conveniently ignore the earlier part where he talks about AmeriKKKa's promissory note, the note of justice, and equal treatment under the law, that came back marked "insufficient funds." 

They never play his speeches that oppose the Viet Nam War, why is that? If they don't and we know that his opposition to violence and war are what made him stand out in bold contrast to his contemporaries in the clergy, men like Billy Graham who supported Lyndon Johnson and Richard Nixon's war in Southeast Asia, or Norman Vincent Peale who never once spoke out against racial oppression, why don't we acknowledge these virtues that made King a hero, especially at a time when AmeriKKKa has morphed into the planet's biggest bully, picking on the weak,  bogarding the lunch money of the lame and infirm of the world. 

What would Martin Luther King Jr. say to George W. Bush about publicly calling for regime change in Iraq after stealing the election of 2000 in AmeriKKKa? What would King say to the cowardly and immoral U.S. Congress about their limp and non-existent opposition to the concept of pre-emptive strikes and use of nuclear weapons? At the time of his assassination King was rumbling on several fronts, supporting the sanitation workers in Memphis and planning the Poor People's Campaign in Washington D.C. to call attention to the quantum gap between the have's and have nots and how the War in Viet Nam was contributing to this gap.

At least in 1968 there was a sizable anti-war movement in the U.S. and King's joining that movement caused the ruling elites great chagrin. His Poor People's Campaign with its emphasis on wealth disparities and policies that perpetuated those inequities while the Military-Industrial Complex was growing richer every day and the attention he focused on AmeriKKKa's immoral war in Southeast Asia is what prompted the powers that be to order his assassination. 

But let us project what we know about King and imagine he was still alive with us now, what would he say and do? I believe he would oppose Bush administration's fascist agenda. I believe he would be calling for rallies, marches, boycotts and massive civil disobedience to call attention to AmeriKKKa's wickedness and galvanize the grass roots to action. I believe Martin Luther King Jr. would denounce the masses' induced passivity and acquiescence in the face of fascism and warmongering. King liked to quote the Biblical prophet Isaiah who spoke of truth, justice and righteousness.

King was not an Afrocentric theologian but I believe if he lived he would have looked at and rethought African history, how the ancient Hebrews were influenced by Kemet and Ethiopia and be forced to acknowledge the righteousness Isaiah talked about was inherent in the culture of Africa. King might have realized that Maat (Divine Order, Balance, Harmony, Truth, Justice, Righteousness and Reciprocity) was the moral/ethical model for Hebrew prophecy and called upon this ancient African moral and ethical building block to rally against the forces of Isfet (Disorder, deceit, chaos, disharmony and war).

As we prepare to celebrate the life and sacrifices of this man, we must do some serious introspection and ask ourselves not only what would Martin say or do, where would he stand on the great issues of today, but more importantly where do I/we stand? Are we trying to be safe popular, expedient or are we committed to doing the right thing?  We must look at the world and determine how we can alter AmeriKKKa's descent into the moral abyss of fascist imperialism?

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The Word of the Lord Is Upon Me

The Righteous Performance of Martin Luther King, Jr.

By Jonathan Rieder

“You don’t know me,” Martin Luther King, Jr., once declared to those who criticized his denunciation of the Vietnam War, who wanted to confine him to the ghetto of “black” issues. Now, forty years after being felled by an assassin’s bullet, it is still difficult to take the measure of the man: apostle of peace or angry prophet; sublime exponent of a beloved community or fiery Moses leading his people up from bondage; black preacher or translator of blackness to the white world? This book explores the extraordinary performances through which King played with all of these possibilities, and others too, blending and gliding in and out of idioms and identities. Taking us deep into King’s backstage discussions with colleagues, his preaching to black congregations, his exhortations in mass meetings, and his crossover addresses to whites, Jonathan Rieder tells a powerful story about the tangle of race, talk, and identity in the life of one of America’s greatest moral and political leaders.

A brilliant interpretive endeavor grounded in the sociology of culture, The Word of the Lord Is Upon Me delves into the intricacies of King’s sermons, speeches, storytelling, exhortations, jokes, jeremiads, taunts, repartee, eulogies, confessions, lamentation, and gallows humor, as well as the author’s interviews with members of King’s inner circle. The King who emerges is a distinctively modern figure who, in straddling the boundaries of diverse traditions, ultimately transcended them all. Beyond Vietnam  / Chronology

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AALBC.com's 25 Best Selling Books


 

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#14 - The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates by Wes Moore

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#19 - John Oliver Killens: A Life of Black Literary Activism by Keith Gilyard

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Quiet Strength: The Faith, the Hope

and the Heart of a Woman Who Changed a Nation

By Rosa Parks

Parks, one of the U.S.' authentic living legends, is the black lady who on December 1, 1955, refused to surrender her bus seat to a white man, was arrested under the Jim Crow law that required blacks to make way for whites, and thereby launched the yearlong bus boycott by blacks in Birmingham, Alabama, which led to the national overturning of that city's and similar segregation laws across the nation. In this tiny collection of what seem like outtakes from oral-history tapes, she rehearses her great day (as it seems from the perspective of history; Parks remembers it as "not a happy experience. . . . I had not planned to be arrested"), stressing that it wasn't, as many have romanticized, because her feet were tired that she didn't move, but because she was "tired of being oppressed . . . just plain tired." Her remarks, disposed somewhat arbitrarily into sections topically named "Fear," "Pain," "Character," "Faith," "Values," reflect her lifelong commitment to justice for black Americans and to peace and equal opportunity for all.

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The Last Holiday: A Memoir

By Gil Scott Heron

Shortly after we republished The Vulture and The Nigger Factory, Gil started to tell me about The Last Holiday, an account he was writing of a multi-city tour that he ended up doing with Stevie Wonder in late 1980 and early 1981. Originally Bob Marley was meant to be playing the tour that Stevie Wonder had conceived as a way of trying to force legislation to make Martin Luther King's birthday a national holiday. At the time, Marley was dying of cancer, so Gil was asked to do the first six dates. He ended up doing all 41. And Dr King's birthday ended up becoming a national holiday ("The Last Holiday because America can't afford to have another national holiday"), but Gil always felt that Stevie never got the recognition he deserved and that his story needed to be told. The first chapters of this book were given to me in New York when Gil was living in the Chelsea Hotel. Among the pages was a chapter called Deadline that recounts the night they played Oakland, California, 8 December; it was also the night that John Lennon was murdered.

Gil uses Lennon's violent end as a brilliant parallel to Dr King's assassination and as a biting commentary on the constraints that sometimes lead to newspapers getting things wrong.Jamie Byng, Guardian

 Gil_reads_"Deadline" (audio)  / Gil Scott-Heron & His Music  Gil Scott Heron Blue Collar  Remember Gil Scott- Heron

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The New Jim Crow

Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness

By Michele Alexander

Contrary to the rosy picture of race embodied in Barack Obama's political success and Oprah Winfrey's financial success, legal scholar Alexander argues vigorously and persuasively that [w]e have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it. Jim Crow and legal racial segregation has been replaced by mass incarceration as a system of social control (More African Americans are under correctional control today... than were enslaved in 1850). Alexander reviews American racial history from the colonies to the Clinton administration, delineating its transformation into the war on drugs. She offers an acute analysis of the effect of this mass incarceration upon former inmates who will be discriminated against, legally, for the rest of their lives, denied employment, housing, education, and public benefits. Most provocatively, she reveals how both the move toward colorblindness and affirmative action may blur our vision of injustice: most Americans know and don't know the truth about mass incarceration—but her carefully researched, deeply engaging, and thoroughly readable book should change that.—Publishers Weekly

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The White Masters of the World

From The World and Africa, 1965

By W. E. B. Du Bois

W. E. B. Du Bois’ Arraignment and Indictment of White Civilization (Fletcher)

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Ancient African Nations

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The Death of Emmett Till by Bob Dylan  The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll  Only a Pawn in Their Game

Rev. Jesse Lee Peterson Thanks America for Slavery / George Jackson  / Hurricane Carter

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The Haitian Declaration of Independence 1804  / January 1, 1804 -- The Founding of Haiti 

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posted 7 January 2003

 

 

 

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