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Mau Mau Aesthetics

Other Literary & Artistic Criticisms

Truth-tellers are not always palatable. / There is a preference for candy bars.

from "Song for Winnie"  by Gwen Brooks

African Retentions   

 

 

Mau Mau in Brief

 

Mau Mau Status in Kenya

Members of Mau Mau are currently recognized by the Kenyan Government as Freedom/Independence Heroes/Heroines who sacrificed their lives in order to free Kenyans from colonial rule. The Government of Kenya has proposed Mashujaa Day (Heroes Day) to be marked annually on 20 October (the same day Baring signed the Emergency order).

According to the Kenyan Government, Mashujaa Day will be a time for Kenyans to remember and honour Mau Mau and other Kenyans who participated in the fight for African freedom and Kenya's independence.

Mashujaa Day will replace Kenyatta Day; the latter has until now also been held on October 20.Wikipedia

The scriptwriters really had to develop the white characters. They were unevenly developed as seen through the eyes of Haley's ancestors, who knew only what they perceived. This point of view extended even to what was going on throughout the country as a whole.

Haley did it through black eyes by surmising that Bell had the ability to read and write, which she kept secret. But she did secretly read the newspapers that Dr. Reynolds left around the house. And so she knew what was being written in the newspapers about the slave revolts and slavery. She didn't tell even Kunta Kinte until after they were married, and she found out that he could read Arabic and could show her what is name looked like in Arabic.Roots Impact

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Mao’s position on white revolutionaries was more practically based in his fight against Western imperialism. He supported anyone who fought on the domestic front against the United States of America--the strongest anti-revolutionary force and the greatest imperialist power in the world. Whites who proposed revolutionary change in America, for Mao, came under the united front strategy of : "The enemies of my enemy are my friends." Mao and the Chinese Revolution had trouble with a white, Russian Revolution that constantly fought Peking for world-wide control of the "international" Communist movement. If revolutionaries as legendary as Malcolm X and Mao had their suspicions about white revolutionaries, then why was Cleaver so eager to embrace them?Retrospective on Soul on Ice

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Dedan Kimathi Waciuri (truly, Kimathi wa Waciuri), (31 October 1920 – 18 February 1957) was a Kenyan rebel leader who fought against the British colonial government in Kenya in the 1950s. He was convicted and executed in 1957 for murder and terrorism. The British colonial government that ruled Kenya considered him a terrorist, as did the many Kenyans who opposed the Mau Maus. The Mau Mau killed at least two thousand Kenyan civilians, 32 European settlers, and 200 British and Kenyan soldiers in the eight year uprising. The British and Kenyan military units killed 20,000 Mau Mau rebels in combat, hanged over 1000 suspected Mau Mau supporters, and interned more than 70,000 Kikuyu civilians. Former Mau Mau viewed Kimathi as a freedom fighterWikipedia

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On September 17, 1938 he was circumcised at the Ihururu Dispensary. In 1939 he got his kipande from the DC’s office and got his first job with the Forestry Department. Leaving there under a cloud he met and impressed a teacher called Eliud Mugo from Mathira Division.

Eliud, blind in one eye and later to become a notoriously oppressive Chief in lriaini Location during the Emergency, arranged for Kimathi to enrol at the Tumutumu CSM School. He stayed there for two years, save for a three-month break in 1941 when he joined the army. He finally left Tumutumu in February 1944, being unable to pay fees arrears.

Over the next five years he tried different ways of earning a living, becoming a school teacher, a clerk with first a dairy and then a timber firm, and a trader. In January 1949 he got a job, but not for long, as a teacher at his old school Karinaini.

But wherever he went and whatever he did Kimathi became a welcome and popular figure with his fellow Kikuyus on his travels. He had a powerful and attractive personality and he began to involve himself in the politics of the day, and also of the night. Initially he was just one of the stewards at the mass rallies held by Kenyatta and other politicians. However, he speedily graduated and became the chief organiser. He was elected secretary of the Ol Kalou and Thomson’s Falls branch of the Kenya African Union (KAU) on June 2, 1952. It is widely accepted that he was already planning a more proactive and aggressive strategy than the Muhimu Central Committee with whom he had long forged links.

Four months later he was involved in organising a mass oathing ceremony on the banks of the Gura River, which was attended by thousands of Kikuyus. Nderi Wang’ombe, the Nyeri District Senior Chief, got wind of what was happening. Fatally, Nderi decided to intervene and he was killed by the frenzied crowd. Kimathi became a marked man and shortly afterwards he was arrested by Chief Muhoya’s Tribal Police at a friend’s house.

At the Chief’s Camp, he did a deal with the guards and disappeared in the night to the Aberdares. He was now 32 years old and entering the most important four years of his life. By the end of it he had been, at the least, a crucial factor in forcing the British Government to reassert its right to dictate the pace of constitutional change in Kenya. British Colonial Secretaries henceforth used this right rapidly too dismantle the white settlers’ political power in Kenya, some more ruthlessly than others.

Kimathi’s war became a most vivid real-life demonstration to the world that the British people, severely exhausted by the Second World War, no longer had either the will or the resources to impose colonialism in Kenya or anywhere else in Africa through the barrel of a gun.

It is one of the ironies of our history that in October 1956 Kimathi was shot and captured while at the same time Lennox-Boyd (Colonial Secretary) was telling the annual conference of the Conservative Party that “any other policy but that of moving towards self-government and satisfaction of nationalist aspirations in the colonies would be fraught with disaster”?Sunday Standard, Kenya, 17th Feb. 2002MisterSeed

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Stories of the Last Days of Kenya Colony

This autobiographical documentary revisits the Mau Mau Rebellion of the 1950s. More than 50 years after the conflict, in which the director participated as a young British soldier stationed in Kenya for his national service, he confronts his past with audacity and unflinching self-inquiry. Combining McWilliams' own photographic record of the times with original animation and archival imagery, A Time There Was crafts a thoughtful account of the Mau Mau Rebellionone of the most contentious episodes in Britain’s imperial endgame.

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Racism: A History, the 2007 BBC 3-part documentary explores the impact of racism on a global scale. It was part of the season of programs on the BBC marking the 200th anniversary of the abolition of slavery in the British Empire. It's divided into 3 parts.

The first, The Colour of Money . . . Racism: A History [2007]—1/3

Begins the series by assessing the implications of the relationship between Europe, Africa and the Americas in the 15th century. It considers how racist ideas and practices developed in key religious and secular institutions, and how they showed up in writings by European philosophers Aristotle and Immanuel Kant.

The second, Fatal Impact . . . Racism: A History [2007] - 2/3

Examines the idea of scientific racism, an ideology invented during the 19th century that drew on now discredited practices such as phrenology and provided an ideological justification for racism and slavery. The episode shows how these theories ultimately led to eugenics and Nazi racial policies of the master race.

And the 3rd, A Savage Legacy . . .  Racism: A History [2007] - 3/3

Examines the impact of racism in the 20th century. By 1900 European colonial expansion had reached deep into the heart of Africa. Under the rule of King Leopold II, the Belgian Congo was turned into a vast rubber plantation. Men, women and children who failed to gather their latex quotas would have their limbs dismembered. The country became the scene of one of the century's greatest racial genocides, as an estimated 10 million Africans perished under colonial rule.

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Remembering Wangari Maathai

Table

 

Alex Haley

Aboard the African Star

Roots Impact

Amin Sharif AS Table

About Romare Bearden

Arturo Sandoval in Baltimore

A Blues for the Birmingham Four  

H. Rap Brown's Die Nigger Die!

If You Only Knew: A Film Review  

i speak of bones

Mama's Letters from Jerusalem

Retrospective on Soul on Ice  

Teaching Dred Scott to City College 

Unforgivable Blackness 

Amiri Baraka

Amiri Baraka    

Black Art 

BAM Roll Call     

From Parks to Marxism A Political Evolution

"Somebody Blew Up America"   

 

Arthur Edgar E. Smith

 

Black Consciousness Poet--Claude McKay

Female Characters in Camara Laye 

John Pepper Clark's Raft Running Adrift  

The Life and Times of Black Poet Claude McKay

Wole Soyina Kongi's Harvest 

 

Anupama Bhargava 

 

     Bungy Jumping

     A day before independence

     Hate

     If Hindi was a respected language in Hindustan     

     Islami Romantics   

     On how to write songs of experience   

     On why people write poetry  

     Relation  

     Tomorrow Does Come!  

     War  

     Working on the cover page of a War magazine!  

 

Askia M. Touré

 

Askia Touré and Marvin X on Black Studies

Dawnsong! 

On Pan Africanism

Osirian Rhapsody: A Myth

Rudy Interviews Askia Touré  

 

Bakari Akil II

 

5 Tragic Stereotypes, Part I   

 

Brent Hayes Edwards

 

The Practice of Diaspora

 

Cane Hope Felder

 

Two Scholars Discuss Afrocentrism  as A Racial Ideology: History & Ethics

 

Carol Cooper

 

Pop Culture Considered as an Uphill Bicycle Race

 

Charles Tisdale

 

Charles Tisdale: Newspaper Man

 

Edwidge Danticat

 

The Dew Breaker 

Out of the Shadows

 

Eugène Ionesco

 

He Who Dares Not to Hate Becomes a Traitor

Notes and Counter Notes -- Writings on the Theatre 

When I Write . . .   

 

H.L. Mencken

 

Letters of H. L. Mencken

The Negro as Author  

 

Huey P. Newton

The Defection of Eldridge Cleaver  

Demythologizing Huey Newton

How the Media Uses Blacks to Chatise Blacks

Revolutionary Suicide

Way Of Liberation Manifesto

Ishmael Reed

The Dark Heathenism of the American Novelist Ishmael Reed

How the Media Uses Blacks to Chatise Blacks

Preface to Cleaver's Soul on Ice 

The Return of the Nigger Breaker

 

Jacques Maritain

The Responsibility of the Artist  

James Baldwin

Fire Last Time by H.L. Gates

Go Tell It on the Mountain

Rainer Reviews Notes of Native Son

Sermon and Blues      

James Weldon Johnson

Race Prejudice and the Negro Artist

Jerhretta Suite

Charm School  

Haiku   

I Am Memory

I Wept Rivers  

Mama and Me   

Our Soul Is the Witness

Smiles  

Jess Mowry

Some Basic Advice about Writing

John Oliver Killens

 "Centrality of Literary Heroes" 

Lest we Forget Killens by Louis Reyes Rivera

Interview with Keith Gilyard

Jonathan Scott

Heroic Minds: All the Great Ones Have Been Anti-Imperialist

If White America Had a Bill Cosby   

The Niggerization of Palestine The Staying Power of Rap    

Notes on Political Education                               

Reflections on Octavia Butler  

Remembering to Not Forget  

Joseph Jordan 

What do you say to fathers

Kalamu ya Salaam KS Table

Black Arts Movement    

Clapping On Two and Four

Could You Wear My Eyes?

Digital Technology & Telling Our Story  

Impotence Need Not Be Permanent--The Decline of Black Men Writing 

in the hot house of black poetry

KS Biblio

On Writing Haiku

Raoul's Silver Song  

What Is Black Poetry   

What Is Life: Reclaiming the Black Blues Self

WORDS: A Neo-Griot Manifesto              

Writing Sonnets  

zora smiles--kalamu at zora neale hurston festival (part 2 of 2)

 

Keenan Norris

 

Coal, Charcoal, and Chocolate Comedy 

fresno gone   

Freedom Vision

Of Obama and Oakland   

 

Kiini Ibura Salaam

The Dance of Love  

Novel Writing

Reflections on Fiji   

There's No Racism Here? 

 

Kwame Nkrumah

 

Responsibility of a Pan-African Socialist  A speech by Osagyefo    

Osagyefo on African Renaissance

 

Langston Hughes

 

Langston Hughes Bio

Notes of a Native Son   

 

Larry Neal

 

Don't Say Goodbye to the Porkpie Hat  

Larry Neal Bio  

Laura Ivers

A Letter To Langston Hughes

Textbook Victimization   

Louis Reyes Rivera

 

Creating an Africana Canon  

(compulsion strikes the witness)

inside the river of poetry

(jorge's journey)

Lest we Forget Killens 

Notes for (jorge's journey) 

Rivera Bio

 

Margaret Walker

 

The Ballad of the Free

Conversations  Contents 

Conversations Review   

Margaret Walker Chronology

Remembering to Not Forget (Scott) 

 

Michael S. Harper

 

Michael Harper Bio

The Quotable Michael Harper

 

Mukoma wa Ngugi

A Glimpse into African Consciousness

Mwatabu S. Okantah

Griot Tradition in the Americas

 

Philip Berrigan

 

Bio-Chronology

Civil Rights Activist 

Psalm for Two Voices

When I Lay Dying 

Widen the Prison Gates     

Who are the Real Enemies?

Marvin X  Marvin X Table

 

Africa or America -- The Emphasis in Black Studies Programs

Islam Needs a Martin Luther 

Toward A Radical Spirituality

Michael A. Gonzales

Barry Michael Cooper

Slow Down Heart  

Why Chesiel Matters   

Milton Meltzer

Folk Life in Black and White

Negro Catholic Writers Preface

The Political Thought of James Forman

Ralph Ellison

Atlantic Monthly Reviews Invisible Man 

Cassidy Reviews Invisible Man 

 Ellison Biography

Ralph Ellison: A Biography

What America Would Be Like Without Negroes  

Richard Wright

    I Bite the Hand That Feeds Me by Richard Wright (A response to David Cohn)

     The Death Bound Subject Richard Wright's Archaeology of Death 

     by Abdul R. JanMohamed

     I Tried to Be a Communist 

     The Negro Novel: Richard Wright   

     Richard Wright's Native Son 

     The Saga of Bigger Thomas by Theophilus Lewis

     Uncle Tom's Children  & Native Son

    Wright Bio-Chronology   

Robert Fleming

After Hours Contents

After Hours Contributors

Introduction to After Hour

Publishers Weekly

Simmons Review     

Romare Bearden

About Romare Bearden by Amin Sharif

The Negro Artist and Modern Art 

Rose Ure Mezu

Africana Women Their Historic Past and Future Activism

 

Rudolph Lewis  Mosquitoes Fly Out My Head

 

Climbing Malcolm's Ladder

Douglass' 1845 Narrative (literary criticism)

Feeding the Five Thousand (a poem)

Feminism, Black Erotica, & Revolutionary Love (on Kalamu's short stories)

I, Momolu or Liberia in the Bush (book review)

Land of My Daughters (book review)

The Lie That Unraveled the World (book review)

Nonwhite Manhood in America

Rudy Interviews Askia Touré   

Rudy Interview Carlyle Van Thompson, author of  The Tragic Black Buck -- Racial   Masquerading  in the American Literary Imagination

Rudy Interviews Keith Gilyard the Rhetoric & Poetics of John Oliver Killens

Rudy Interviews Louis Reyes Rivera author of Scattered Scripture 

Rudy Interviews Yusef Komunyakaa (New Orleans, May 1985)

Tending One’s Own Garden (book review of Shaw's "Black Girl")

A Theory of a Black Aesthetic  (literary essay on Christian)

Understanding "Last Man Standing"  

Wish I Could Tell You the Truth Essays by Marvin X (book review)

 

Sandra L. West

     Coming of Age in 1960s Newark

     Leslie Garland Bolling  

     We Are A Dancing People 

     Wendy Stand Up with Your Proud Hair! 

 

Theophilus Lewis

 

     The Saga of Bigger Thomas 

 

Tillie Olsen

     Silences of the Marginal (on Black Writing)

 

Uche Nworah  Table

Contemporary African Women Struggle With Love

Feminism in Africa

The Mythology of Igbo Names

Nigerian Politicians as Gangsters

 

Ugochukwu Ejinkeonye

 

Poor poetry, rich deceit:  Is 419 America's  middle name?

The Phrasing Of ISP Letters Is Misleading    

ISP Deceives . . . Says Charlie Hughes

 

Van G. Garrett

African Folktales Still Influence Modern Thought  

“Instructions for Your New Osiris” 

Wanda Coleman

Coleman Reviews Maya Angelou

Wilson Moses Table

The Eternal Linkage of Literature and Society

Two Scholars Discuss Afrocentrism as A Racial Ideology: History & Ethics

Yusef Komunyakaa

Rudy Interviews Yusef Komunyakaa (New Orleans, May 1985)

Yusef Speaks 1    

Yusef Speaks 2    

Yusef Speak 3 

*   *   *   *   *

Related files

African Retentions 

Brooklyn National Black Writers Conference 

Feminism in Africa 

Folk Life in Black and White

George Schuyler Agrees To Review  

George Schuyler and Christian  

God's Trombones  

H L  Mencken on Negro Authors

Letters of H. L. Mencken

Letters: Mencken to Schuyler Selected Letters   

Literature & Arts  

Love, Sex, and Erotica

Lumumba: A Biography

Mosquitoes Fly Out My Head

Nathan Scott, Jr.

The Negro as Author

Negro History and Culture

The Practice of Diaspora

Regarding the Pain of Others Reviews  

Sontag Bibliography

*   *   *   *   *

We always knew the crazy tales our people told about the vicious madness of White Supremacy, enforced by Uncle Sam Gestapo Good Old Boy Cracker Nazis, Spawn of the “Soul Thieves” (Fred said) who bought our bodies to work for them free, forever, so they could be rich and rule the world.  Sunday School and one people and friends and brains had told us clearly to recognize:  Heathens, jealous Crackers the old folks called them.  Racists.  Lynchers.  The spiritual KKK in America’s soul.

We are its Blood, ourselves.  Sucked out of our homes by our African selves as captors, then sold to vampire-like European and American slaves traders.  They are the meaning of Halloween.  The Skull and Crossbones is their only flag. From Parks to Marxism

*   *   *   *   *

McKay always evinces a sensitive identification with his people, both in their sufferings as well as in their joys.  Proud of his race, the wrongs they suffer hurts him.  But in his early work there is no strident racial protest except for two poems "Jim at Sixteen"  and "Strokes of Tamarind Switch."  "Jim at Sixteen" shows the raw wound McKay’s tight handcuffs make on the wrist of the arrested lad.  But with patience, he kept saying that he knew he could not help it, confessing how sad and ashamed he felt even though it was accidental.  "Strokes of Tamarind" is written in reaction to a judicial flogging he had witnessed;  "I could not bear to see him – my own flesh – stretched out over the bench, so I went away to the Post Office near by."  The boy who had cried during the flogging broke down later while talking to McKay who was so moved that he gave him tickets for his train journey.  Such gentleness of spirit for a policeman is softness, unmanliness, and sentimentality.  But this brings about the finer verse based on an instinctive feeling of sympathy for a suffering people, and no less for an individual.Black Consciousness Poet

*   *   *   *   *

Later, I returned to Harlem, in ' 68; and Comrade Ernie Allen, co-editor of Soulbook, and I participated in Part II of the BAM, by organizing the "Loft" movement on 125th St. Our Loft was called "The Black Mind," and we joined in with the Original Last Poets (of whom I became a mentor), whose Loft was named the "East Wind."

These lofts, in conjunction with Barbara Ann Teer's National Black Theater Workshop, the Studio Museum in Harlem, led by our Black Dialogue editor, and comrade, Ed Spriggs and with Robert McBeth and Ed Bullin's New Lafayette Theater, and Ernie McClintock's theater, became the major institutions which led the Second Phase of the Harlem BAM (roughly '68 to '74) which was in continuous contact w/Imamu Baraka's Spirit House in New Ark. Baraka's "Spirit House Movers" often performed @ our Loft-theaters, and visited the New Lafayette Theatre.Rudy Interviews Askia Touré

*   *   *   *   *

There is perhaps more discomfort now in the fact that a large percentage of the twelve million undocumented are poor and brown and from the developing world. For years, people like Pat Buchanan have bemoaned the fact that there was no melting taking place in the pot. They consider un-American what they see as the immigrant’s backward glance at their sometimes poverty stricken and politically heated homelands.

Monies sent back are equated with taxes not being paid. Newborn babies are health care thieves. And since good fences make good neighbors, especially when only one neighbor can afford to build or would seemingly benefit from the fence, images of barbed-wire topped walls with armed Minutemen on the other side dance around in wistfully nativist heads.Out of the Shadows

  

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AALBC.com's 25 Best Selling Books

For July 1st through August 31st 2011
 

Fiction

#1 - Justify My Thug by Wahida Clark
#2 - Flyy Girl by Omar Tyree
#3 - Head Bangers: An APF Sexcapade by Zane
#4 - Life Is Short But Wide by J. California Cooper
#5 - Stackin' Paper 2 Genesis' Payback by Joy King
#6 - Thug Lovin' (Thug 4) by Wahida Clark
#7 - When I Get Where I'm Going by Cheryl Robinson
#8 - Casting the First Stone by Kimberla Lawson Roby
#9 - The Sex Chronicles: Shattering the Myth by Zane

#10 - Covenant: A Thriller  by Brandon Massey

#11 - Diary Of A Street Diva  by Ashley and JaQuavis

#12 - Don't Ever Tell  by Brandon Massey

#13 - For colored girls who have considered suicide  by Ntozake Shange

#14 - For the Love of Money : A Novel by Omar Tyree

#15 - Homemade Loves  by J. California Cooper

#16 - The Future Has a Past: Stories by J. California Cooper

#17 - Player Haters by Carl Weber

#18 - Purple Panties: An Eroticanoir.com Anthology by Sidney Molare

#19 - Stackin' Paper by Joy King

#20 - Children of the Street: An Inspector Darko Dawson Mystery by Kwei Quartey

#21 - The Upper Room by Mary Monroe

#22 – Thug Matrimony  by Wahida Clark

#23 - Thugs And The Women Who Love Them by Wahida Clark

#24 - Married Men by Carl Weber

#25 - I Dreamt I Was in Heaven - The Rampage of the Rufus Buck Gang by Leonce Gaiter

Non-fiction

#1 - Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention by Manning Marable
#2 - Confessions of a Video Vixen by Karrine Steffans
#3 - Dear G-Spot: Straight Talk About Sex and Love by Zane
#4 - Letters to a Young Brother: MANifest Your Destiny by Hill Harper
#5 - Peace from Broken Pieces: How to Get Through What You're Going Through by Iyanla Vanzant
#6 - Selected Writings and Speeches of Marcus Garvey by Marcus Garvey
#7 - The Ebony Cookbook: A Date with a Dish by Freda DeKnight
#8 - The Isis Papers: The Keys to the Colors by Frances Cress Welsing
#9 - The Mis-Education of the Negro by Carter Godwin Woodson

#10 - John Henrik Clarke and the Power of Africana History  by Ahati N. N. Toure

#11 - Fail Up: 20 Lessons on Building Success from Failure by Tavis Smiley

#12 -The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander

#13 - The Black Male Handbook: A Blueprint for Life by Kevin Powell

#14 - The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates by Wes Moore

#15 - Why Men Fear Marriage: The Surprising Truth Behind Why So Many Men Can't Commit  by RM Johnson

#16 - Black Titan: A.G. Gaston and the Making of a Black American Millionaire by Carol Jenkins

#17 - Brainwashed: Challenging the Myth of Black Inferiority by Tom Burrell

#18 - A New Earth: Awakening to Your Life's Purpose by Eckhart Tolle

#19 - John Oliver Killens: A Life of Black Literary Activism by Keith Gilyard

#20 - Alain L. Locke: The Biography of a Philosopher by Leonard Harris

#21 - Age Ain't Nothing but a Number: Black Women Explore Midlife by Carleen Brice

#22 - 2012 Guide to Literary Agents by Chuck Sambuchino
#23 - Chicken Soup for the Prisoner's Soul by Tom Lagana
#24 - 101 Things Every Boy/Young Man of Color Should Know by LaMarr Darnell Shields

#25 - Beyond the Black Lady: Sexuality and the New African American Middle Class  by Lisa B. Thompson

*   *   *   *   *

 

Unbowed: A Memoir

By Wangari Maathai

The mother of three, the first woman in East and Central Africa to earn a doctorate, and the first African woman to receive the Nobel Peace Prize, Wangari Maathai of Kenya understands how the good earth sustains life both as a biologist and as a Kikuyu woman who, like generations before her, grew nourishing food in the rich soil of Kenya's central highlands. In her engrossing and eye-opening memoir, a work of tremendous dignity and rigor, Maathai describes the paradise she knew as a child in the 1940s, when Kenya was a "lush, green, fertile" land of plenty, and the deforested nightmare it became. Discriminated against as a female university professor, Maathai has fought hard for women's rights. And it was women she turned to when she undertook her mission to restore Kenya's decimated forests, launching the Green Belt Movement and providing women with work planting trees. Maathai's ingenious, courageous, and tenacious activism led to arrests, beatings, and death threats, and yet she and her tree-planting followers remained unbowed. Currently Kenya's deputy minister for the environment and natural resources, Nobel laureate, visionary, and hero, Maathai has restored humankind's innate if nearly lost knowledge of the intrinsic connection between thriving, wisely managed ecosystems and health, justice, and peace.—Booklist

*   *   *   *   *

Video: "South Side Story" Ta-Nehisi Coates discusses Michelle Obama with Paul Coates an outspoken publisher and former Black Panther—his father.

“American Girl"

By Ta Nehesi Coates

When Michelle Obama told a Milwaukee campaign rally last February, "For the first time in my adult life, I am proud of my country," critics derided her as another Angry Black Woman. But the only truly radical proposition put forth by Obama, born and raised in Chicago's storied South Side, is the idea of a black community fully vested in the country at large, and proud of the American dream.

*   *   *   *   *

AALBC.com's 25 Best Selling Books


 

Fiction

#1 - Justify My Thug by Wahida Clark
#2 - Flyy Girl by Omar Tyree
#3 - Head Bangers: An APF Sexcapade by Zane
#4 - Life Is Short But Wide by J. California Cooper
#5 - Stackin' Paper 2 Genesis' Payback by Joy King
#6 - Thug Lovin' (Thug 4) by Wahida Clark
#7 - When I Get Where I'm Going by Cheryl Robinson
#8 - Casting the First Stone by Kimberla Lawson Roby
#9 - The Sex Chronicles: Shattering the Myth by Zane

#10 - Covenant: A Thriller  by Brandon Massey

#11 - Diary Of A Street Diva  by Ashley and JaQuavis

#12 - Don't Ever Tell  by Brandon Massey

#13 - For colored girls who have considered suicide  by Ntozake Shange

#14 - For the Love of Money : A Novel by Omar Tyree

#15 - Homemade Loves  by J. California Cooper

#16 - The Future Has a Past: Stories by J. California Cooper

#17 - Player Haters by Carl Weber

#18 - Purple Panties: An Eroticanoir.com Anthology by Sidney Molare

#19 - Stackin' Paper by Joy King

#20 - Children of the Street: An Inspector Darko Dawson Mystery by Kwei Quartey

#21 - The Upper Room by Mary Monroe

#22 – Thug Matrimony  by Wahida Clark

#23 - Thugs And The Women Who Love Them by Wahida Clark

#24 - Married Men by Carl Weber

#25 - I Dreamt I Was in Heaven - The Rampage of the Rufus Buck Gang by Leonce Gaiter

Non-fiction

#1 - Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention by Manning Marable
#2 - Confessions of a Video Vixen by Karrine Steffans
#3 - Dear G-Spot: Straight Talk About Sex and Love by Zane
#4 - Letters to a Young Brother: MANifest Your Destiny by Hill Harper
#5 - Peace from Broken Pieces: How to Get Through What You're Going Through by Iyanla Vanzant
#6 - Selected Writings and Speeches of Marcus Garvey by Marcus Garvey
#7 - The Ebony Cookbook: A Date with a Dish by Freda DeKnight
#8 - The Isis Papers: The Keys to the Colors by Frances Cress Welsing
#9 - The Mis-Education of the Negro by Carter Godwin Woodson

#10 - John Henrik Clarke and the Power of Africana History  by Ahati N. N. Toure

#11 - Fail Up: 20 Lessons on Building Success from Failure by Tavis Smiley

#12 -The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander

#13 - The Black Male Handbook: A Blueprint for Life by Kevin Powell

#14 - The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates by Wes Moore

#15 - Why Men Fear Marriage: The Surprising Truth Behind Why So Many Men Can't Commit  by RM Johnson

#16 - Black Titan: A.G. Gaston and the Making of a Black American Millionaire by Carol Jenkins

#17 - Brainwashed: Challenging the Myth of Black Inferiority by Tom Burrell

#18 - A New Earth: Awakening to Your Life's Purpose by Eckhart Tolle

#19 - John Oliver Killens: A Life of Black Literary Activism by Keith Gilyard

#20 - Alain L. Locke: The Biography of a Philosopher by Leonard Harris

#21 - Age Ain't Nothing but a Number: Black Women Explore Midlife by Carleen Brice

#22 - 2012 Guide to Literary Agents by Chuck Sambuchino
#23 - Chicken Soup for the Prisoner's Soul by Tom Lagana
#24 - 101 Things Every Boy/Young Man of Color Should Know by LaMarr Darnell Shields

#25 - Beyond the Black Lady: Sexuality and the New African American Middle Class  by Lisa B. Thompson

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What Orwell Didn't Know

Propaganda and the New Face of American Politics

By Andras Szanto

Propaganda. Manipulation. Spin. Control. It has ever been thus—or has it? On the eve of the 60th anniversary of George Orwell's classic essay on propaganda (Politics and the English Language), writers have been invited to explore what Orwell didn't—or couldn't—know. Their responses, framed in pithy, focused essays, range far and wide: from the effect of television and computing, to the vast expansion of knowledge about how our brains respond to symbolic messages, to the merger of journalism and entertainment, to lessons learned during and after a half-century of totalitarianism. Together, they paint a portrait of a political culture in which propaganda and mind control are alive and well (albeit in forms and places that would have surprised Orwell). The pieces in this anthology sound alarm bells about the manipulation and misinformation in today's politics, and offer guideposts for a journalism attuned to Orwellian tendencies in the 21st century.

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The Gardens of Democracy: A New American Story

of Citizenship, the Economy, and the Role of Government

By Eric Liu and Nick Hanauer

American democracy is informed by the 18th century’s most cutting edge thinking on society, economics, and government. We’ve learned some things in the intervening 230 years about self interest, social behaviors, and how the world works. Now, authors Eric Liu and Nick Hanauer argue that some fundamental assumptions about citizenship, society, economics, and government need updating. For many years the dominant metaphor for understanding markets and government has been the machine. Liu and Hanauer view democracy not as a machine, but as a garden. A successful garden functions according to the inexorable tendencies of nature, but it also requires goals, regular tending, and an understanding of connected ecosystems. The latest ideas from science, social science, and economics—the cutting-edge ideas of today—generate these simple but revolutionary ideas: (The economy is not an efficient machine. It’s an effective garden that need tending. Freedom is responsibility. Government should be about the big what and the little how. True self interest is mutual interest.

 
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Weep Not, Child

By Ngugi wa Thiong'o

This is a powerful, moving story that details the effects of the infamous Mau Mau war, the African nationalist revolt against colonial oppression in Kenya, on the lives of ordinary men and women, and on one family in particular. Two brothers, Njoroge and Kamau, stand on a rubbish heap and look into their futures. Njoroge is excited; his family has decided that he will attend school, while Kamau will train to be a carpenter. Together they will serve their countrythe teacher and the craftsman. But this is Kenya and the times are against them. In the forests, the Mau Mau is waging war against the white government, and the two brothers and their family need to decide where their loyalties lie. For the practical Kamau the choice is simple, but for Njoroge the scholar, the dream of progress through learning is a hard one to give up.—Penguin 

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The White Masters of the World

From The World and Africa, 1965

By W. E. B. Du Bois

W. E. B. Du Bois’ Arraignment and Indictment of White Civilization (Fletcher)

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Ancient African Nations

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Negro Digest / Black World

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The Death of Emmett Till by Bob Dylan  The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll  Only a Pawn in Their Game

Rev. Jesse Lee Peterson Thanks America for Slavery

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The Journal of Negro History issues at Project Gutenberg

The Haitian Declaration of Independence 1804  / January 1, 1804 -- The Founding of Haiti 

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update18 May 2012

 

 

 

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