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The book looks into the harmful consequences of the racist depictions of Africans,

such as condoning the enslavement and colonization of Black people, genocide,

contempt, hatred and racism towards Africans and people of African descent.

 

 

Step Aside Joseph Conrad!

 

The Hearts of Darkness

By Milton Allimadi

 

Explosive Book Exposes some Newspapers', including The New York Times’, culpability in racist representation of Africa in early news coverage.

Milton Allimadi, graduate of the Columbia Journalism School, investigative reporter and publisher of The Black Star News, has written an explosive investigative book that digs deep into the history of the negative, racist media representations of Africans and people of African descent that persist in contemporary America.

The Hearts of Darkness, How White Writers Created The Racist Image of Africa, (Black Star Books, 2003, ISBN 0-9740039-0-5 $12) is an exploration into Western media’s historical demonization of Africa over the last several centuries – from Herodotus’ “The Histories,” the journals of the so-called explorers such as Samuel Baker, and the 20th century reportage by journalists with American news publications, including The New York Times

The book looks into the harmful consequences of the racist depictions of Africans, such as condoning the enslavement and colonization of Black people, genocide, contempt, hatred and racism towards Africans and people of African descent. It also examines the inferiority complex and self-hatred that some Black people suffer as a result of bombardment by negative media images.

Allimadi takes readers on a journey of discovery where he encountered many gatekeepers that would have preferred his work never be published, including The Columbia Journalism Review a publication that masquerades as “the bible of objective journalism.”

In this powerful book, spiced with rich and compelling anecdotes and examples, Allimadi offers insight into the process behind the “tribalization” of Africa and African peoples. He explains how and why Western media were able to dismiss the Rwanda genocide as merely a “tribal” affair when the massacres erupted in 1994, while ignoring underlying factors including the 1990 invasion from Uganda. 

He shows the similarities between how Kenya’s Jomo Kenyatta was demonized in the 1960s by Western media for leading the so-called Mau Mau uprising when Kenyans battled British settlers who had stolen their lands and the way Zimbabwe’s Robert Mugabe has been similarly derided once he started seizing land from British settlers for redistribution to Africans.

The book includes a historical analysis of The New York Times, Time Magazine, Newsweek, National Geographic and The New Yorker. It contains exclusive letters from The New York Times' archives exposing the racism of some editors and reporters involved in that newspaper's early African coverage, including two-time Pulitzer Prize winner, the late Homer Bigart. The Pulitzer committee should consider revoking the awards posthumously.

Allimadi candidly explains how news organizations were often accomplices and apologists for the negative stereotypes. The book is also an engaging tour of European travelers who went to “explore” and “discover” Africa between the 18th and 19th centuries. He shows how Africans were merely backdrops in the Europeans’ accounts, as they often still are today.

Allimadi shows that these travelers’ publications served as the original media responsible for disseminating the racist images of Africa around the world. Allimadi discusses how centuries of racist representations have created inferiority complexes and Black self-hatred. The book is an educational weapon against racism globally. The book is already on its third print run and has sold 20,000 copies.

Some of the people who have praised The Hearts of Darkness --

Robert Mugabe, President of Zimbabwe

Dr. Julianne Malveaux, Economist and leading social commentator

Imhotep Gary Byrd, leading WBAI radio commentator

Elombe Brath, WBAI/founder Patrice Lumumba movement

Jill Nelson, commentator and author “Sexual Healing”, “Volunteer Slavery”

Glen Ford, Publisher Blackcommentator.com

Hon. Charles Barron, New York City councilmember

Baffour Ankomah, Editor, New African magazine

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You can order the book by sending a Money Order for $15 (which includes postage and handling) made payable to Black Star Books, P.O. Box 64, New York, N.Y., 10025, or calling (212) 481-7745. The book is available at Barnes & Noble and can also be ordered through www.amazon.com

For speaking engagements or book signings: Please contact Milton Allimadi through (212) 481-7745 or Milton@blackstarnews.com  http://www.blackstarnews.com/index.html

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AALBC.com's 25 Best Selling Books


 

Fiction

#1 - Justify My Thug by Wahida Clark
#2 - Flyy Girl by Omar Tyree
#3 - Head Bangers: An APF Sexcapade by Zane
#4 - Life Is Short But Wide by J. California Cooper
#5 - Stackin' Paper 2 Genesis' Payback by Joy King
#6 - Thug Lovin' (Thug 4) by Wahida Clark
#7 - When I Get Where I'm Going by Cheryl Robinson
#8 - Casting the First Stone by Kimberla Lawson Roby
#9 - The Sex Chronicles: Shattering the Myth by Zane

#10 - Covenant: A Thriller  by Brandon Massey

#11 - Diary Of A Street Diva  by Ashley and JaQuavis

#12 - Don't Ever Tell  by Brandon Massey

#13 - For colored girls who have considered suicide  by Ntozake Shange

#14 - For the Love of Money : A Novel by Omar Tyree

#15 - Homemade Loves  by J. California Cooper

#16 - The Future Has a Past: Stories by J. California Cooper

#17 - Player Haters by Carl Weber

#18 - Purple Panties: An Eroticanoir.com Anthology by Sidney Molare

#19 - Stackin' Paper by Joy King

#20 - Children of the Street: An Inspector Darko Dawson Mystery by Kwei Quartey

#21 - The Upper Room by Mary Monroe

#22 – Thug Matrimony  by Wahida Clark

#23 - Thugs And The Women Who Love Them by Wahida Clark

#24 - Married Men by Carl Weber

#25 - I Dreamt I Was in Heaven - The Rampage of the Rufus Buck Gang by Leonce Gaiter

Non-fiction

#1 - Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention by Manning Marable
#2 - Confessions of a Video Vixen by Karrine Steffans
#3 - Dear G-Spot: Straight Talk About Sex and Love by Zane
#4 - Letters to a Young Brother: MANifest Your Destiny by Hill Harper
#5 - Peace from Broken Pieces: How to Get Through What You're Going Through by Iyanla Vanzant
#6 - Selected Writings and Speeches of Marcus Garvey by Marcus Garvey
#7 - The Ebony Cookbook: A Date with a Dish by Freda DeKnight
#8 - The Isis Papers: The Keys to the Colors by Frances Cress Welsing
#9 - The Mis-Education of the Negro by Carter Godwin Woodson

#10 - John Henrik Clarke and the Power of Africana History  by Ahati N. N. Toure

#11 - Fail Up: 20 Lessons on Building Success from Failure by Tavis Smiley

#12 -The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander

#13 - The Black Male Handbook: A Blueprint for Life by Kevin Powell

#14 - The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates by Wes Moore

#15 - Why Men Fear Marriage: The Surprising Truth Behind Why So Many Men Can't Commit  by RM Johnson

#16 - Black Titan: A.G. Gaston and the Making of a Black American Millionaire by Carol Jenkins

#17 - Brainwashed: Challenging the Myth of Black Inferiority by Tom Burrell

#18 - A New Earth: Awakening to Your Life's Purpose by Eckhart Tolle

#19 - John Oliver Killens: A Life of Black Literary Activism by Keith Gilyard

#20 - Alain L. Locke: The Biography of a Philosopher by Leonard Harris

#21 - Age Ain't Nothing but a Number: Black Women Explore Midlife by Carleen Brice

#22 - 2012 Guide to Literary Agents by Chuck Sambuchino
#23 - Chicken Soup for the Prisoner's Soul by Tom Lagana
#24 - 101 Things Every Boy/Young Man of Color Should Know by LaMarr Darnell Shields

#25 - Beyond the Black Lady: Sexuality and the New African American Middle Class  by Lisa B. Thompson

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1493: Uncovering the New World Columbus Created

By Charles C. Mann

I’m a big fan of Charles Mann’s previous book 1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus, in which he provides a sweeping and provocative examination of North and South America prior to the arrival of Christopher Columbus. It’s exhaustively researched but so wonderfully written that it’s anything but exhausting to read. With his follow-up, 1493, Mann has taken it to a new, truly global level. Building on the groundbreaking work of Alfred Crosby (author of The Columbian Exchange and, I’m proud to say, a fellow Nantucketer), Mann has written nothing less than the story of our world: how a planet of what were once several autonomous continents is quickly becoming a single, “globalized” entity.

Mann not only talked to countless scientists and researchers; he visited the places he writes about, and as a consequence, the book has a marvelously wide-ranging yet personal feel as we follow Mann from one far-flung corner of the world to the next. And always, the prose is masterful. In telling the improbable story of how Spanish and Chinese cultures collided in the Philippines in the sixteenth century, he takes us to the island of Mindoro whose “southern coast consists of a number of small bays, one next to another like tooth marks in an apple.”

We learn how the spread of malaria, the potato, tobacco, guano, rubber plants, and sugar cane have disrupted and convulsed the planet and will continue to do so until we are finally living on one integrated or at least close-to-integrated Earth. Whether or not the human instigators of all this remarkable change will survive the process they helped to initiate more than five hundred years ago remains, Mann suggests in this monumental and revelatory book, an open question.

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Life on Mars

By Tracy K. Smith

Tracy K. Smith, author of Life on Mars has been selected as the winner of the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. In its review of the book, Publishers Weekly noted the collection's "lyric brilliance" and "political impulses [that] never falter." A New York Times review stated, "Smith is quick to suggest that the important thing is not to discover whether or not we're alone in the universe; it's to accept—or at least endure—the universe's mystery. . . . Religion, science, art: we turn to them for answers, but the questions persist, especially in times of grief. Smith's pairing of the philosophically minded poems in the book’s first section with the long elegy for her father in the second is brilliant." Life on Mars follows Smith's 2007 collection, Duende, which won the James Laughlin Award from the Academy of American Poets, the only award for poetry in the United States given to support a poet's second book, and the first Essence Literary Award for poetry, which recognizes the literary achievements of African Americans. The Body’s Question (2003) was her first published collection.

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The White Masters of the World

From The World and Africa, 1965

By W. E. B. Du Bois

W. E. B. Du Bois’ Arraignment and Indictment of White Civilization (Fletcher)

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Ancient African Nations

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The Death of Emmett Till by Bob Dylan  The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll  Only a Pawn in Their Game

Rev. Jesse Lee Peterson Thanks America for Slavery / George Jackson  / Hurricane Carter

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The Journal of Negro History issues at Project Gutenberg

The Haitian Declaration of Independence 1804  / January 1, 1804 -- The Founding of Haiti 

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update 9 May 2012

 

 

 

Home  Transitional Writings on Africa

Related files: The Hearts of Darkness  Times Concocted 'Darkest Africa'    Inventing Africa: New York Times