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The EBR Collection charts Amiri Baraka, Sonia Sanchez, Nikki Giovanni, Quincy Troupe, and more than one hundred

other black poets and artists year after year at reading after reading looking more and more vibrant and energetic.

The EBR Collection also charts notable transformations.

 

 

Books by Eugene Redmond

Sides of the River (1969)  /  Sentry of the Four Golden Pillars (1970) / River of Bones and Flesh and Blood (1971) / Songs from an Afro/Phone (1972)

 In a Time of Rain & Desire (1973) / Echo Tree: The Collected Short Fiction of Henry Dumas (2003)

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Report on the 10th National Black Writers Conference

@ Medgar Evers College in Brooklyn NY

By Eugene B. Redmond

 

Yo cohorts—
 
Back at the MotherShip after being immersed in the 10th National Black Writers Conference @ Medgar Evers College in Brooklyn NY. Over four daze, Toni Morrison, Edward Kamau Brathwaite, Sonia Sanchez, Amiri Baraka, Talib Kweli, Gary Bartz, Gil Scott-Heron, James McBride, Maaza Mengiste, Tony Medina, Kevin Powell, Louis Massiah, Tayari Jones, Herb Boyd, Malaika Adero, Susan L. Taylor, Colson Whitehead, Kalamu ya Salaam and others shared/bared their hearts/arts and then partied--with a purpose, as we used to say in the '60's—hard.
 
Below is Howard Rambsy's preface to a photo exhibit designed especially for NBWC and housed in the Innis Library at M.E.C. [Medgar Evers College in Brooklyn NY]. easy, ebr . . .

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Visualizing Literary Thunder
An Exhibit from the Eugene B. Redmond Collection
Curated by Howard Rambsy II


 
In retrospect, the publication of Eugene B. Redmond’s Drumvoices: The Mission of Afro-American Poetry, A Critical History (1976) marks an important shift in the history of black literary history. Although many observers pinpoint the late 1970s as a time of declining significance for the cultural enterprise known as the Black Arts Movement, it was during these years that Redmond began to dramatically increase his methods of charting African American cultural activity.

The results of Redmond’s tremendous efforts form the basis of what is now known as the Eugene B. Redmond (EBR) Collection, an extensive collection of books, literary magazines, rare program booklets and flyers, audio recordings, and more than 150,000 photographs of literary artists, musicians, entertainers, supporters of the arts and political activists. The EBR Collection, which is housed at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville’s Lovejoy Library, could easily be subtitled, “the ongoing mission of black arts activity.”
 
The EBR Collection provides remarkable evidence that artists who came of age during the 1960s have remained quite active during the latter decades of the 20th century and the first decade of the 21st century. If the Black Arts Movement ended during the mid 1970s, then the artists whom Redmond has documented over the last decades failed to receive the memo that their artistic activities should somehow be in decline.

The EBR Collection charts Amiri Baraka, Sonia Sanchez, Nikki Giovanni, Quincy Troupe, and more than one hundred other black poets and artists year after year at reading after reading looking more and more vibrant and energetic. The EBR Collection also charts notable transformations. For example, one of Redmond’s photographs shows an editor named Toni Morrison in her office at Random House during the early 1970s, and then later, Redmond photographs that editor-turned-novelist at a party in 1994 being honored for recently receiving the Nobel Prize in Literature.

One of Redmond’s images shows Maya Angelou at a small gathering celebrating her birthday in 1976; another Redmond image shows Angelou, alongside Oprah Winfrey, at a much larger affair celebrating Angelou’s 80th birthday in 2008. Redmond’s Drumvoices charts a history of black poetry; and the EBR Collection documents more than 40 years of evolving movements in African American artistic culture.
 
This exhibit, “Visualizing Literary Thunder,” from the Lovejoy Library’s EBR Collection, highlights past National Black Writers Conferences (NBWC) and features noted honorees and participants of the conferences, such as John Oliver Killens, Toni Morrison, Amiri Baraka, Toni Cade Bambara, Edward Kamau Brathwaite, and Jayne Cortez.

The panels show participants at the NBWC over the years and at various other gatherings across the country. Images showcasing various events beyond the NBWC clarify the involvement of multiple literary artists, musicians, and participants over a period of time and demonstrate interconnectivity of various African American literary projects and
conferences.

The photographs present a wide range of figures, including Barbara Christian, Tom Dent, Charles Johnson, Paule Marshall, Terry McMillan, Walter Mosley, Elizabeth Nunez, Kevin Powell,Ishmael Reed, Darlene Roy, Sonia Sanchez, Ntozake Shange, Sekou Sundiata, Eleanor Traylor, Alice Walker, Margaret Walker, John A. Williams, August Wilson, and many more. The images make us more aware of how Eugene B. Redmond has served as one of our most committed and extraordinary African American cultural witnesses, and overall, the exhibit showcases the past and developing movements of black literary and cultural activity.

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Source of photos: http://www.FaceBook Troy Johnson Album.

Eugene B. Redmond (born 1937 St. Louis) is an American poet, and academic.He graduated from Southern Illinois University, and from Washington University with an M.A. He is an Emeritus Professor of English at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. He founded the EBR Writers Club in March of 1986.His papers are held at University of Illinois at Springfield,  and photo archive at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville.

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posted 29 March 2010

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AALBC.com's 25 Best Selling Books


 

Fiction

#1 - Justify My Thug by Wahida Clark
#2 - Flyy Girl by Omar Tyree
#3 - Head Bangers: An APF Sexcapade by Zane
#4 - Life Is Short But Wide by J. California Cooper
#5 - Stackin' Paper 2 Genesis' Payback by Joy King
#6 - Thug Lovin' (Thug 4) by Wahida Clark
#7 - When I Get Where I'm Going by Cheryl Robinson
#8 - Casting the First Stone by Kimberla Lawson Roby
#9 - The Sex Chronicles: Shattering the Myth by Zane

#10 - Covenant: A Thriller  by Brandon Massey

#11 - Diary Of A Street Diva  by Ashley and JaQuavis

#12 - Don't Ever Tell  by Brandon Massey

#13 - For colored girls who have considered suicide  by Ntozake Shange

#14 - For the Love of Money : A Novel by Omar Tyree

#15 - Homemade Loves  by J. California Cooper

#16 - The Future Has a Past: Stories by J. California Cooper

#17 - Player Haters by Carl Weber

#18 - Purple Panties: An Eroticanoir.com Anthology by Sidney Molare

#19 - Stackin' Paper by Joy King

#20 - Children of the Street: An Inspector Darko Dawson Mystery by Kwei Quartey

#21 - The Upper Room by Mary Monroe

#22 – Thug Matrimony  by Wahida Clark

#23 - Thugs And The Women Who Love Them by Wahida Clark

#24 - Married Men by Carl Weber

#25 - I Dreamt I Was in Heaven - The Rampage of the Rufus Buck Gang by Leonce Gaiter

Non-fiction

#1 - Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention by Manning Marable
#2 - Confessions of a Video Vixen by Karrine Steffans
#3 - Dear G-Spot: Straight Talk About Sex and Love by Zane
#4 - Letters to a Young Brother: MANifest Your Destiny by Hill Harper
#5 - Peace from Broken Pieces: How to Get Through What You're Going Through by Iyanla Vanzant
#6 - Selected Writings and Speeches of Marcus Garvey by Marcus Garvey
#7 - The Ebony Cookbook: A Date with a Dish by Freda DeKnight
#8 - The Isis Papers: The Keys to the Colors by Frances Cress Welsing
#9 - The Mis-Education of the Negro by Carter Godwin Woodson

#10 - John Henrik Clarke and the Power of Africana History  by Ahati N. N. Toure

#11 - Fail Up: 20 Lessons on Building Success from Failure by Tavis Smiley

#12 -The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander

#13 - The Black Male Handbook: A Blueprint for Life by Kevin Powell

#14 - The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates by Wes Moore

#15 - Why Men Fear Marriage: The Surprising Truth Behind Why So Many Men Can't Commit  by RM Johnson

#16 - Black Titan: A.G. Gaston and the Making of a Black American Millionaire by Carol Jenkins

#17 - Brainwashed: Challenging the Myth of Black Inferiority by Tom Burrell

#18 - A New Earth: Awakening to Your Life's Purpose by Eckhart Tolle

#19 - John Oliver Killens: A Life of Black Literary Activism by Keith Gilyard

#20 - Alain L. Locke: The Biography of a Philosopher by Leonard Harris

#21 - Age Ain't Nothing but a Number: Black Women Explore Midlife by Carleen Brice

#22 - 2012 Guide to Literary Agents by Chuck Sambuchino
#23 - Chicken Soup for the Prisoner's Soul by Tom Lagana
#24 - 101 Things Every Boy/Young Man of Color Should Know by LaMarr Darnell Shields

#25 - Beyond the Black Lady: Sexuality and the New African American Middle Class  by Lisa B. Thompson

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Super Rich: A Guide to Having it All

By Russell Simmons

Russell Simmons knows firsthand that wealth is rooted in much more than the stock  market. True wealth has more to do with what's in your heart than what's in your wallet. Using this knowledge, Simmons became one of America's shrewdest entrepreneurs, achieving a level of success that most investors only dream about. No matter how much material gain he accumulated, he never stopped lending a hand to those less fortunate. In Super Rich, Simmons uses his rare blend of spiritual savvy and street-smart wisdom to offer a new definition of wealth-and share timeless principles for developing an unshakable sense of self that can weather any financial storm. As Simmons says, "Happy can make you money, but money can't make you happy."

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The New Jim Crow

Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness

By Michele Alexander

Contrary to the rosy picture of race embodied in Barack Obama's political success and Oprah Winfrey's financial success, legal scholar Alexander argues vigorously and persuasively that [w]e have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it. Jim Crow and legal racial segregation has been replaced by mass incarceration as a system of social control (More African Americans are under correctional control today... than were enslaved in 1850). Alexander reviews American racial history from the colonies to the Clinton administration, delineating its transformation into the war on drugs. She offers an acute analysis of the effect of this mass incarceration upon former inmates who will be discriminated against, legally, for the rest of their lives, denied employment, housing, education, and public benefits. Most provocatively, she reveals how both the move toward colorblindness and affirmative action may blur our vision of injustice: most Americans know and don't know the truth about mass incarceration—but her carefully researched, deeply engaging, and thoroughly readable book should change that.—Publishers Weekly

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The White Masters of the World

From The World and Africa, 1965

By W. E. B. Du Bois

W. E. B. Du Bois’ Arraignment and Indictment of White Civilization (Fletcher)

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Ancient African Nations

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The Death of Emmett Till by Bob Dylan  The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll  Only a Pawn in Their Game

Rev. Jesse Lee Peterson Thanks America for Slavery / George Jackson  / Hurricane Carter

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The Journal of Negro History issues at Project Gutenberg

The Haitian Declaration of Independence 1804  / January 1, 1804 -- The Founding of Haiti 

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update 5 March 2012

 

 

 

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