ChickenBones: A Journal

for Literary & Artistic African-American Themes

   

Home  ChickenBones Store (Books, DVDs, Music, and more)  

Google
 

The reactionary suicide is "wise," and the revolutionary suicide is a "fool," a fool

for the revolution in the way Paul meant when he spoke of being "a fool for Christ."

 

 

Books by Huey P. Newton

Revolutionary Suicide  /  War Against the Panthers  / Huey P. Newton Reader / To Die for the People / The Genius of Huey P. Newton

In Search of Common Ground  / Insights and Poems / Essays from the Minister of Defense

*   *   *   *   *

Revolutionary Suicide, Huey Speaks

David Walker & Nathaniel Turner

Speak of Will Francis & Lucy Barrow

Conversations with Joyce, Miriam & Wilson

 

*   *   *   *   *

I Am We, Or Revolutionary Suicide

By Huey P. Newton

"the spirit of the generations . . . touched God's heart"

There is an old African saying, "I am we." If you met an African in ancient times and asked him who he was, he would reply, "I am we. This is revolutionary suicide: I, we, all of us are the one and the multitude.

So many of my comrades are gone now. Some tight partners, crime partners, and brothers off the block are begging on the street. Others are in asylum, penitentiary, or grave. They are all suicides of one kind of another who had the sensitivity and tragic imagination to see the oppression. Some overcame; they are the revolutionary suicides. Others were reactionary suicides who either overestimated or underestimated the enemy, but in any case were powerless to change their conception of the oppressor.

The differences lies in hope and desire. By hoping and desiring, the revolutionary suicide chooses life; he is, in the words of Nietzsche, "an arrow of longing for another shore." Both suicides despise tyranny, but the revolutionary is both a great despiser and a great adorer who longs for another shore.

The reactionary suicide must learn, as his brother the revolutionary has learned, that the desert is not a circle. It is a spiral. When we have passed through the desert, nothing will be the same.

You cannot bare your throat to the murderer. As George Jackson said, you must defend yourself and take the dragon position as in karate and make the front kick and the back kick when you are surrounded. You do not beg because your enemy comes with the butcher knife and the hatchet in the other. "He will not become a Buddhist over night."

The Preacher said that the wise man and the fool have the same end: they go to the grave as a dog. Who sends us to the grave? The unknowable, the force that dictates to all classes, all territories, all ideologies; he is death, the Big Boss. An ambitious man seeks to dethrone the Big Boss, to free himself, to control when and how he will go to the grave.

There is another illuminating story of the wise man and the fool, found in Mao's Little Red Book. A foolish old man went to the North Mountain and began to dig; a wise old man passed by and said, "Why do you dig; foolish old man? Do you not know that you cannot move the mountain with a little shovel?" But the foolish old man answered resolutely, "While the mountain cannot get any higher, it will get lower with each shovelful. When I pass on, my sons and his sons and his son's sons will go on making the mountain lower. Why can't we move the mountain?"

And the foolish old man kept digging, and the generations that followed after him, and the wise old man looked on in disgust. But the resoluteness and the spirit of the generations that followed the foolish old man touched God's heart, and God sent two angels who put the mountain on their backs and moved the mountain.

This is the story Mao told. When he spoke of God he meant the six hundred million who had helped him to move imperialism and bourgeois thinking, the two great mountains.

The reactionary suicide is "wise," and the revolutionary suicide is a "fool," a fool for the revolution in the way Paul meant when he spoke of being "a fool for Christ." That foolishness can move the mountains of oppression; it is our great leap and our commitment to the dead and the unborn.

We will touch God's heart; we will touch the people's heart, and together we will move the mountain.

*   *   *   *   *

A Conversation on Post-Katrina Events

Wilson: Rudy, I know you will not despair.   Your job is to educate.   You have been manfully discharging your duty throughout the month of September.  Your efforts will not go unrecognized or unrecorded.  You have no more power than Socrates or Jeremiah.   You have only the power of David Walker.   In the long run, we must ask ourselves whether David Walker or Nathaniel Turner had the greater effect.   Your destiny is to be a David Walker, not a Nat Turner.  So, I send my words of support.   You are doing a great deal, more than sitting in the dust and bemoaning our fate.   You are trying to make people think.  And to feel.  That is a worth a great deal.   A few people in every generation will always listen.

Rudy:  You know, both were sought out and murdered, one privately, the other by the State. Neither end entices me. I suppose they both had hopes and desires. They were both arrows that long for the distance shore. Maybe in a sense Turner bared his throat to his murderers. Each felt, however, that his life could move mountains. In that both of their lives gain respect, it is a difficult choice by any method.

For Walker, nevertheless, his life was seized in the middle of the night, while few eyes watched. Like one of my uncles, they never found his body, did they? Turner hanged on a tree at the nearby county courthouse (jail) at noon in Jerusalem. Though we have seemingly, somewhere, Turner's skull, there remains something much more fascinating in what Turner chose for his life.

It's true, we have no place to go for either to call up the name of the dead, like at Malcolm's or King's grave. No matter. That Nathaniel Turner made a conscious decision to deliver himself up to the hangman remains appealing to me. For Walker what we have mostly is his words. But for Turner, we have mind, words, and deeds. Here is where we get in some teeth, some tread. It is one thing to be caught on the road or dragged from one's room, and given the shaft, or poisoned by surreptitious hands.

It is quite another for a man, who can save his life in the bush (anonymously), to choose rather death within community, however short it falls from perfection, but to choose community (civil life) to assert his life's task (mind, words, and deeds) and therein defend the ways of both God and man (Christian slaves). Man, o, man, what a man!

It is said that he knew they would disassemble his body, desecrate it. But not even this act which he knew would come after he gave up his last breath did not deter him, this fear did not sadden him, did not make him less anxious for the hangman's noose. He had already won the day. Let them do their worst. At that point, he was assured his story would be told, to the world, and its publication would be from Baltimore.

Though we have the journalistic efforts of Walker available to us, there is none that can be likened to the journalistic coup orchestrated by Nathaniel Turner in the telling of his story, in the justification of his deeds. And I feel with the greatest certainty we have his story. And that story is known so thoroughly, there has been so much ink spilt on getting it right.

So, no, unless you can tell me something I don't know about that North Carolina boy I don't already know, I will stay with this my spirit guide. The greatest of Negro freedom fighters, he who sought the salvation of all, through the blood of Christ, beckons to me to pick up my cross and follow. I will stay true to this Virginia prophet who still walks the fields and bogs of Southside, Virginia, whose voice still remains there in the pines and the winds for those who have ears to hear and souls that think.

Wilson: I think they found Walker's body in Brattle Street, a few doors from his shop.  As Benjamin Brawley put it in 1938 "the belief is persistent that he met with foul play."  That is to say, many surmised that he had been poisoned. 

Joyce: Was this the plan all along? The widely circulated formulaic stories of rape, murder and descent into "savagery" have been recanted by the Mayor of New Orleans and the Superintendent of Police, who has RESIGNED.

But how will we ever address this post-modern global criminalization and de-humanization of African people--again (and again)?

Rudy: The thing is that we have not moved that far away from just plain post reconstruction criminalization. And the two lynch pins in this criminal drama this proliferation of "urban myths" were a black mayor and a black police chief. Bush was not the only one who had cronies working in highly crucial and frontline jobs.

Our Mister Sams serve the interest only of their masters the best way they know, defend first their property, their order, and their power. However much better, much more far off we would be at this moment if we had had a mayor and a police chief who loved black people, and loved even more poor black people? Where would we be today if we had voices other then the political hot shots, the political mouths that speak first and foremost in the interest of the powerful?

What if we did not have political puppets who sell out our lives to the highest bidder? To have such fellows in place, yes, that has been the plan since the first slave ship landed on the coast of West Africa, since the first caravan crossed the Sahara. Oh, how oppression remains universal, persisting over time, place, and resistance! The gain is so attractive and oppression has become so abstract & unfeeling in the camera's lens, that the art of being a political hack and a racial disgrace is today a career sought after by the best of us.

Miriam: It just makes you want to cry--the pervasiveness of racism--and, believe me, it's going to get much much worse.  Unfortunately, we have no one, at least no one in power, to speak for us because you're right:  we have too many Black overseer/puppets and no David Walkers or Nat Turners in sight.

Rudy: That is the story, Miriam, that we have not learned from the life of Walker and Turner. Read the 1831 Confessions  again. You know, there were many millennialists who existed at that time, and previously in American history. They all waited on Christ to come down from the sky. They awaited the rapture. 

They wait when they cannot do a simple matter like read the writing on the wall, nor, for that matter, the words of the Declaration of Independence, nor the Bill of Rights. They were not able to read the Scriptures they claimed to love with a simple heart. But here was this backwoods Negro, in a backwoods Jerusalem, who knew more philosophy, more about scripture, and revelations than those who study at Princeton and Harvard combined. How extraordinary! He had no Doctorate of Divinity, no Ph.D.

He had no Church he could call his own. He knew the handle of a plow more than that of the gavel. More about nature, and blood on the leaves, than our environmentalists, today. He was a man who lived and sought daily the righteous. Here was a judge for the Ages. Here was a man who could read Luke, a man who took the Scriptures to heart.

He understood the words of the prophet of Nazareth. Each man had to take up the cross and to follow him who was willing to sacrifice all when all was at hand. It was no longer a time, Turner recognized, for Jesus to carry the cross.

How many times does one man have to do that. How many times must he be crucified. Life is living, not crucifixion. 

Our interpretation, our theology threw itself off the mountain, willful self-murder.  Christ thus put his cross down. It had lost its spice. We had his blood; it remained available—that of humanity. It was our choice to decide what we will do with it. Should we endure and wait on the Christ from the skies, on our weak-kneed leaders, or shall we lived vitally as men and women in this world, at this moment?

We have faith to survive. That we have shown. But do we have the faith each of us to live vitally in the now? That is the challenge that Nathaniel Turner left us. Can the simplest of men, make a difference? He was American in this vision. That is the question Turner placed before us. Do we wait to be delivered? Or do we act, now. That is, as Huey P. Newton reminds us, "revolutionary suicide." Ours must be an existential quest, Can any of us adopt that as the Negro way of life, this service to the people.

Speak not to me of leaders. Speak to me not of priests and ritual practitioners and mindless habits. Speak to me only of those who will take up the cross.

Let us speak of Will Francis Killing Fiends & Monsters. Let us speak of Lucy Barrow, Revolutionary When we speak of these I will have sign sufficient our thinking is where it needs to be for us to win, to move the mountain, however long it stands.

Miriam: You said it all, and so eloquently.  Speak also of Maria Stewart and Henry Highland Garnet.  Speak of Charles and Sarah Remond.  Speak too of Harriet Tubman and Alexander Crummell.  All those ancestors who plowed the field that now lies fallow.

Rudy: I am at a loss, Miriam. I know only a couple of names from that list. And I do not know that they represent the virtues at all that I symbolize in Will Francis and Lucy Barrow. Harriet Tubman, yes. Who cannot recognize her individual effort, without any prompting, without any leader to guide her, acted to save lives, to set an example of service. Maybe that's true of Crummell, that individual effort.

But for me Crummell carries too much weight of the prejudices of leadership. Wilson Moses admires him and has written well of him. And Du Bois sought out his greatness. Such men as Crummell come all too infrequent. They are too good to be true. No, our salvation does not reside in the exceptional. It is from among the uncommon common man and woman, we will find our examples. That is where our hope resides.

The land lies not fallow. We just do not have hands enough to make the harvest.

posted 28 September 2005

*   *   *   *   *

The Caged Panther the Prison Years of Huey P. Newton—J. Herman Blake—We also had some very rich exchanges in discussing the ideas of Emile Durkheim—a French sociologist considered one of the founders of the discipline Sociology. His works are cited at the beginning of any introduction to sociology course. I was interested in Durkheim’s ideas about “collective consciousness” and group behavior. Newton had also read Durkheim and was much more interested in his development of the social causes of suicide. Newton had read an article in EBONY Magazine that a fellow inmate had shared, discussing Herbert Hendin’s study of the rising incidence of suicide among African Americans—particularly males. This was a new and surprising trend and apparently a subject of intense discussion during the mealtimes he shared with other inmates. Newton and I talked about Durkheim’s articulation of the major types of suicide: Anomic, Altruistic, Egoistic, and Fatalistic.

First of all, Newton was troubled by the increasing suicide rate among Black males. He was dissatisfied with the way the trend was discussed in the article for he felt the writer accepted the pattern as understandable even if not acceptable. In talking about the social forces used to explain suicide, Newton began to use Durkheim’s paradigm to analyze these forces and develop an expanded version of the theory. In Newton’s view, fatalistic suicide as explained by Durkheim resulted from situations where individuals felt oppressed and reacted by killing themselves as an escape from their oppression. Newton theorized that when faced with overwhelming social forces to kill oneself was “reactionary suicide.” However, if the individual had a strong desire to fulfill their life, they would move against their oppressors and seek to liberate themselves and their people. Even if the oppressors had much greater forces leading to the individual’s death, the revolutionary act of moving against oppression rather than self-destruction would result in “revolutionary suicide” a form of liberation.

In other words, “revolutionary suicide” resulted from such an overwhelming desire to live free that one would take action against an oppressor in spite of the odds. As he developed the idea of “revolutionary suicide” in his reflections on the writings of Herbert Hendin and the theories of Emile Durkheim, Huey Newton seemed to become liberated himself. Newton ruminated at length about Durkheim’s formulation of how social forces—either tightly woven or very loose—might lead a person to kill oneself. However, he argued further that if social forces were overwhelmingly constraining, the revolutionary act would be to move against the social forces and their agents—even if that action led to one’s own death.

When he originally articulated the concept of revolutionary suicide, Newton saw it as another one of the abstract ideas we were developing to stimulate his mind during his time in his jail cell. While excited by his own analytical development of the concept, he did not envision going further with the idea. It was one of many ideas we discussed in relation to social conditions of poor people around the world in general and Black people in America in particular. Eventually it was to become the title of the autobiography that emerged from our collaboration. Initially the concept revolutionary suicide was ensconced in an intellectual array of ideas to be discussed with other inmates in lieu of brothers on the block. At that time, there was no indication Newton wanted to pursue the idea further or promote the concept. We talked about it and went on to other matters.Springer

*   *   *   *   *

DVDs -- A Huey P. Newton Story 2001  / What We Want, What We Believe The Black Panther Party Library 

The Spook Who Sat By the Door  / Passin' It On; The Black Panthers' Search for Justice /

*   *   *   *   *

Huey Percy Newton (February 17, 1942 – August 22, 1989) was an American political and urban activist who, along with Bobby Seale, co-founded the Black Panther Party for Self Defense. . . .

There are many references to Huey Newton in popular music, including in the songs "Changes" by Tupac Shakur, "Welcome To The Terrordome" by Public Enemy, "Queens Get The Money" by Nas, "Sunny Kim" by Andre Nickatina, "Just A Celebrity" by The Jacka, "Same Thing" by Flobots, "Dreams" and "911 Is A Joke(Cop Killa)" by The Game, "You Can't Murder Me" by Papoose, "Police State" by Dead Prez, "Propaganda" by Dead Prez "We Want Freedom" by Dead Prez, "Malcolm, Garvey, Huey" by Dead Prez, "SLR" by Lupe Fiasco, "Bill Gates Freestyle" by Fabolous feat. Paul Cain, "Huey Newton" by Wiz Khalifa & Currensy,"Hiiipower" by Kendrick Lamar, "My Favorite Mutiny" by The Coup, and "Dream Team" by Spearhead. In the comic strip and cartoon show The Boondocks, the main character Huey Freeman, a ten year-old African-American revolutionary, is named after Newton; another reference comes when Freeman starts an independent newspaper, dubbing it the Free Huey World Report. In 1996, A Huey P. Newton Story was performed on stage by veteran actor Roger Guenveur Smith. The one-man play later was made into an award-winning 2001 film directed by Spike Lee.Wikipedia

*   *   *   *   *

 

Black Panther: The Revolutionary Art of Emory Douglas The Black Panther Party for Self Defense, formed in the aftermath of the assassination of Malcolm X in 1965, remains one of the most controversial movements of the 20th-century. Founded by the charismatic Huey P. Newton and Bobby Seale, the party sounded a defiant cry for an end to the institutionalized subjugation of African Americans. The Black Panther newspaper was founded to articulate the party's message and artist Emory Douglas became the paper's art director and later the party's Minister of Culture. Douglas's artistic talents and experience proved a powerful combination: his striking collages of photographs and his own drawings combined to create some of the era's most iconic images, like that of Newton with his signature beret and large gun set against a background of a blood-red star, which could be found blanketing neighborhoods during the 12 years the paper existed. This landmark book brings together a remarkable lineup of party insiders who detail the crafting of the party's visual identity. Publisher Rizzoli

Douglas was the Norman Rockwell of the ghetto, concentrating on the poor and oppressed. Departing from the WPA/social realist style of portraying poor people, which can be perceived as voyeuristic and patronizing, Douglas’s energetic drawings showed respect and action. He maintained poor people’s dignity while graphically illustrating harsh situations.Wikipedia

*   *   *   *   *

 

Liberation, Imagination, and the Black Panther Party

A New Look at the Panthers and Their Legacy

By Kathleen Cleaver and George Katsiasficas's

If this volume of essays only offered us documentation and insight into the contributions and wide-ranging influence of the Black Panther Party, it would have immense historical significance. But Kathleen Cleaver's and George Katsiasficas's collection does much more. It creates intriguing and provocative conversations among scholars, activists, contemporary political prisoners and original members of the BPP that invite us to extricate ourselves from the numbing nostalgia that often accompanies invocations of black berets and leather jackets.

It invites us to re-imagine our relationship to this past and to think critically about the meaning of liberation today.—Angela Y. Davis, Professor, History of Consciousness, UC Santa Cruz

The history of the Black Panther Party is an indispensable part of the dramatic account of black struggle in this country, and this book is an important contribution to that history. The essayists have impressive credentials as either members of the Party or keen observers of its activities, and because they carry the story into the present day the book becomes especially valuable.—Howard Zinn, author of A People's History of the United States.

*   *   *   *   *

AALBC.com's 25 Best Selling Books


 

Fiction

#1 - Justify My Thug by Wahida Clark
#2 - Flyy Girl by Omar Tyree
#3 - Head Bangers: An APF Sexcapade by Zane
#4 - Life Is Short But Wide by J. California Cooper
#5 - Stackin' Paper 2 Genesis' Payback by Joy King
#6 - Thug Lovin' (Thug 4) by Wahida Clark
#7 - When I Get Where I'm Going by Cheryl Robinson
#8 - Casting the First Stone by Kimberla Lawson Roby
#9 - The Sex Chronicles: Shattering the Myth by Zane

#10 - Covenant: A Thriller  by Brandon Massey

#11 - Diary Of A Street Diva  by Ashley and JaQuavis

#12 - Don't Ever Tell  by Brandon Massey

#13 - For colored girls who have considered suicide  by Ntozake Shange

#14 - For the Love of Money : A Novel by Omar Tyree

#15 - Homemade Loves  by J. California Cooper

#16 - The Future Has a Past: Stories by J. California Cooper

#17 - Player Haters by Carl Weber

#18 - Purple Panties: An Eroticanoir.com Anthology by Sidney Molare

#19 - Stackin' Paper by Joy King

#20 - Children of the Street: An Inspector Darko Dawson Mystery by Kwei Quartey

#21 - The Upper Room by Mary Monroe

#22 – Thug Matrimony  by Wahida Clark

#23 - Thugs And The Women Who Love Them by Wahida Clark

#24 - Married Men by Carl Weber

#25 - I Dreamt I Was in Heaven - The Rampage of the Rufus Buck Gang by Leonce Gaiter

Non-fiction

#1 - Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention by Manning Marable
#2 - Confessions of a Video Vixen by Karrine Steffans
#3 - Dear G-Spot: Straight Talk About Sex and Love by Zane
#4 - Letters to a Young Brother: MANifest Your Destiny by Hill Harper
#5 - Peace from Broken Pieces: How to Get Through What You're Going Through by Iyanla Vanzant
#6 - Selected Writings and Speeches of Marcus Garvey by Marcus Garvey
#7 - The Ebony Cookbook: A Date with a Dish by Freda DeKnight
#8 - The Isis Papers: The Keys to the Colors by Frances Cress Welsing
#9 - The Mis-Education of the Negro by Carter Godwin Woodson

#10 - John Henrik Clarke and the Power of Africana History  by Ahati N. N. Toure

#11 - Fail Up: 20 Lessons on Building Success from Failure by Tavis Smiley

#12 -The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander

#13 - The Black Male Handbook: A Blueprint for Life by Kevin Powell

#14 - The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates by Wes Moore

#15 - Why Men Fear Marriage: The Surprising Truth Behind Why So Many Men Can't Commit  by RM Johnson

#16 - Black Titan: A.G. Gaston and the Making of a Black American Millionaire by Carol Jenkins

#17 - Brainwashed: Challenging the Myth of Black Inferiority by Tom Burrell

#18 - A New Earth: Awakening to Your Life's Purpose by Eckhart Tolle

#19 - John Oliver Killens: A Life of Black Literary Activism by Keith Gilyard

#20 - Alain L. Locke: The Biography of a Philosopher by Leonard Harris

#21 - Age Ain't Nothing but a Number: Black Women Explore Midlife by Carleen Brice

#22 - 2012 Guide to Literary Agents by Chuck Sambuchino
#23 - Chicken Soup for the Prisoner's Soul by Tom Lagana
#24 - 101 Things Every Boy/Young Man of Color Should Know by LaMarr Darnell Shields

#25 - Beyond the Black Lady: Sexuality and the New African American Middle Class  by Lisa B. Thompson

*   *   *   *   *

Revolutionary Suicide

By Huey P. Newton, Ho Che Anderson (Illustrator), Fredrika Newton (Introduction)

Eloquently tracing the birth of a revolutionary, Huey P. Newton's famous and oft-quoted autobiography is as much a manifesto as a portrait of the inner circle of America's Black Panther Party. From Newton's impoverished childhood on the streets of Oakland to his adolescence and struggles with the system, from his role in the Black Panthers to his solitary confinement in the Alameda County Jail, Revolutionary Suicide is smart, unrepentant, and thought-provoking in its portrayal of inspired radicalism.

Huey P. Newton (1942-1989) was an activist and inspirational leader of the Black Panther Party. Fredrika Newton joined the Black Panther Party as a youth member in 1969 and married Huey P. Newton in 1984. She established the Huey P. Newton Foundation, a non-profit educational organization, in 1993. Ho Che Anderson was born in London in 1969 and named after the Vietnamese and Cuban revolutionaries Ho Chi Minh and Che Guevara. He is primarily known for his comic books King, I Want to Be Your Dog, Wise Son, and Scream Queen.

*   *   *   *   *

Malcolm X

A Life of Reinvention

By Manning Marable

Years in the making-the definitive biography of the legendary black activist.

Of the great figure in twentieth-century American history perhaps none is more complex and controversial than Malcolm X. Constantly rewriting his own story, he became a criminal, a minister, a leader, and an icon, all before being felled by assassins' bullets at age thirty-nine. Through his tireless work and countless speeches he empowered hundreds of thousands of black Americans to create better lives and stronger communities while establishing the template for the self-actualized, independent African American man. In death he became a broad symbol of both resistance and reconciliation for millions around the world.

Manning Marable's new biography of Malcolm is a stunning achievement. Filled with new information and shocking revelations that go beyond the Autobiography, Malcolm X unfolds a sweeping story of race and class in America, from the rise of Marcus Garvey and the Ku Klux Klan to the struggles of the civil rights movement in the fifties and sixties.

Reaching into Malcolm's troubled youth, it traces a path from his parents' activism through his own engagement with the Nation of Islam, charting his astronomical rise in the world of Black Nationalism and culminating in the never-before-told true story of his assassination. Malcolm X will stand as the definitive work on one of the most singular forces for social change, capturing with revelatory clarity a man who constantly strove, in the great American tradition, to remake himself anew.

*   *   *   *   *

Black Panther: The Revolutionary Art of Emory Douglas The Black Panther Party for Self Defense, formed in the aftermath of the assassination of Malcolm X in 1965, remains one of the most controversial movements of the 20th-century. Founded by the charismatic Huey P. Newton and Bobby Seale, the party sounded a defiant cry for an end to the institutionalized subjugation of African Americans. The Black Panther newspaper was founded to articulate the party's message and artist Emory Douglas became the paper's art director and later the party's Minister of Culture.

Douglas's artistic talents and experience proved a powerful combination: his striking collages of photographs and his own drawings combined to create some of the era's most iconic images, like that of Newton with his signature beret and large gun set against a background of a blood-red star, which could be found blanketing neighborhoods during the 12 years the paper existed. This landmark book brings together a remarkable lineup of party insiders who detail the crafting of the party's visual identity. Publisher Rizzoli

Douglas was the Norman Rockwell of the ghetto, concentrating on the poor and oppressed. Departing from the WPA/social realist style of portraying poor people, which can be perceived as voyeuristic and patronizing, Douglas’s energetic drawings showed respect and action. He maintained poor people’s dignity while graphically illustrating harsh situations.Wikipedia

*   *   *   *   *

Liberation, Imagination, and the Black Panther Party

A New Look at the Panthers and Their Legacy

By Kathleen Cleaver and George Katsiasficas's

If this volume of essays only offered us documentation and insight into the contributions and wide-ranging influence of the Black Panther Party, it would have immense historical significance. But Kathleen Cleaver's and George Katsiasficas's collection does much more. It creates intriguing and provocative conversations among scholars, activists, contemporary political prisoners and original members of the BPP that invite us to extricate ourselves from the numbing nostalgia that often accompanies invocations of black berets and leather jackets.

It invites us to re-imagine our relationship to this past and to think critically about the meaning of liberation today.—Angela Y. Davis, Professor, History of Consciousness, UC Santa Cruz

The history of the Black Panther Party is an indispensable part of the dramatic account of black struggle in this country, and this book is an important contribution to that history. The essayists have impressive credentials as either members of the Party or keen observers of its activities, and because they carry the story into the present day the book becomes especially valuable.—Howard Zinn, author of A People's History of the United States.

*   *   *   *   *

A Taste of Power: A Black Woman's Story

By Elaine Brown

Brown here relates the dramatic story of her youth, her political awakening and her role in the Black Panther Party when she succeeded her lover Huey Newton to become the group's first female leader. Though smoothly written, the book contains much reconstructed dialogue that may daunt readers. Brown's memoir takes her from a Philadelphia ghetto to California, from college to cocktail waitressing, from wanting to be white to joining the black power movement. She meets Eldridge Cleaver, George Jackson and Bobby Seale, goes to jail, visits North Korea and North Vietnam, debates Marxism and gets involved in Oakland, Calif., politics. When other Black Panthers seemed to lose sight of the revolution and seek power for its own sake, Brown, with a growing feminist consciousness, left the group.

She now lives in France and expresses ambivalent feelings about the party she once loved. Having made her acquaintance, the reader wonders about her present life.—Publishers Weekly

*   *   *   *   *

Panther Baby

A Life of Rebellion and Reinvention

By Jamal Joseph

In the 1960s he exhorted students at Columbia University to burn their college to the ground. Today he’s chair of their School of the Arts film division. Jamal Joseph’s personal odyssey—from the streets of Harlem to Riker’s Island and Leavenworth to the halls of Columbia—is as gripping as it is inspiring. Eddie Joseph was a high school honor student, slated to graduate early and begin college. But this was the late 1960s in Bronx’s black ghetto, and fifteen-year-old Eddie was introduced to the tenets of the Black Panther Party, which was just gaining a national foothold. By sixteen, his devotion to the cause landed him in prison on the infamous Rikers Island—charged with conspiracy as one of the Panther 21 in one of the most emblematic criminal cases of the sixties. When exonerated, Eddie—now called Jamal—became the youngest spokesperson and leader of the Panthers’ New York chapter.

He joined the “revolutionary underground,” later landing back in prison. Sentenced to more than twelve years in Leavenworth, he earned three degrees there and found a new calling. He is now chair of Columbia University’s School of the Arts film division.

*   *   *   *   *

The White Masters of the World

From The World and Africa, 1965

By W. E. B. Du Bois

W. E. B. Du Bois’ Arraignment and Indictment of White Civilization (Fletcher)

*   *   *   *   *

Ancient African Nations

*   *   *   *   *

If you like this page consider making a donation

online through PayPal

*   *   *   *   *

Negro Digest / Black World

Browse all issues


1950        1960        1965        1970        1975        1980        1985        1990        1995        2000 ____ 2005        

Enjoy!

*   *   *   *   *

The Death of Emmett Till by Bob Dylan  The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll  Only a Pawn in Their Game

Rev. Jesse Lee Peterson Thanks America for Slavery

*   *   *   *   *

The Journal of Negro History issues at Project Gutenberg

The Haitian Declaration of Independence 1804  / January 1, 1804 -- The Founding of Haiti 

*   *   *   *   *

*   *   *   *   *

ChickenBones Store (Books, DVDs, Music, and more)  

 

 

 

 

 

update25 July 2012

 

 

 

Home  Amiri Baraka  Black Arts and Black Power Figures  Eldridge Cleaver Table  Conversations Table   Mau Mau Aesthetics  Katrina New Orleans Flood Index 

Related files:  Way Of Liberation Manifesto  The Defection of Eldridge Cleaver   Demythologizing Huey Newton   Revolutionary Suicide     Manning Marable's Malcolm X Book  

The Exiles