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Letters from the

Archives of Marcus Bruce Christian

From & To Friends, Colleagues, & Wife

 

 

Books by Marcus Bruce Christian

Song of the Black Valiants: Marching Tempo / High Ground: A Collection of Poems  / Negro soldiers in the Battle of New Orleans

I am New Orleans: A Poem / Negro Iron Workers of Louisiana: 1718-1900 /  The Liberty Monument

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Letter 37

Ruth Anxious About War's End 

Plans to Return to Will's Point

 

ARMY SERVICE FORCES 

Chicago Signal Depot 

1903 West Pershing Road 

Chicago 9, Illinois 

September 11, 1945 

 

My dear Bruce, 

Many thanks for your wonderful letter. I thoroughly enjoyed it but must say I am somewhat disappointed in your reactions regarding Dillard. As I remember, it had always been your desire to be connected with Dillard and now that you are, more or less so, I, like Dr. Quarles, think you are making a mistake. Are you quite sure you cannot find another plan other than the one you have chosen without breaking away from Dillard? In doing so you may lose all possible opportunity to achieve something at the University.

No, I don't think it wise but Bruce you know best and I am sure if you're bent on such a measure your reasons must be sound.

I was glad to hear about Quarles, and sorry to hear about Dean Moses. Somehow . . . when I think of Dillard I naturally think of Quarles and Moses, and you of course, after that, there isn't much more.

As for Willie, I might say your summation was very clear and concise. I am quite satisfied with what you have said. I don't care that much about gossip to pursue the matter any further.

Many thanks for the book. Received it the same day I received your letter. It was kind of Bontemps to remember us together. I shall read it and return it as soon as possible.

Yes, the war is over. And the next war will probably be the end of all wars and the end of civilization as well. I think this could well be called the Atomic age, what with the atom fighting our wars, driving our trains, etc. It doesn't seem as though Science can go any further. I have been reading about the Atomic bomb and last week there was a program entitled "Mr. X" featuring Herbert Marshall. The story was about the rock from which the atom was obtained . . . the Uranium, a piece of stalactite. The deposit of which is found in Africa. Last week there was also an article in the DEFENDER to that effect. Also on the front page of the Herald was the story of a Chicago Negro's part in the developing of the Atomic bomb. This was the first instant of my seeing a Negro make the front page.

I finally made 'Carmen Jones'. A Magnificent stage play. However, I did not see Muriel Smith in the Lead. There is a double cast. It just so happened the night I attended, Inez Matthews played Carmen. At any rate the whole performance was Superb.

There are two more functions I must attend before returning home. I simply must see ANNA LUCASTA and THE BALLET RUSSE DE MONTE CARLO. I have chosen Sept. 28 when CHOPIN CONCERTO and SCHEHERAZADE will be presented. If I am able I shall also try to make RIGOLETTO which is now playing at the Ashland Boulevard Auditorium.

I am going to try to stay in Chicago until I have seen these. My reason for saying this is because . . . my job is only a war job and may soon be panning out. Almost half the Depot has been notified. I haven't as yet. It's only a matter of weeks. They are transferring some folks to other jobs . . . I don't think I'll be here too long. By October if things are right I may return home to Will's Point, La. I have managed to buy myself a swell Life time Schaeffer fountain pen. It's super. 

When you obtain my folder from Dr. Dailey please keep it for me. I will call for it sometime in the future. I don't need it right now.

Bruce, I had heard so much about Oscar Micheaux's WIND FROM NOWHERE that I decided to read it. It was the most badly written piece of work I have ever put my hands on. His story is good but I am afraid he doesn't know how to put it down. Would you believe it, he ends it, "They lived happily ever afterward." I am enclosing a circular of it and also a program from the Grant Park Concert. The latter you will of course return.

I am sorry for reprimanding you for your short note. I should have realized you're a very busy man. Only I didn't know how busy. Forgive me this time, won't you.

Give love to all. 

Ruth

<<---Previous  

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Ruth Warm again on Chicago and Gives Christian Her View of Conflict  / Ruth Unhappy with Christian's Response

Ruth Lonely for Christian Chicago Wears Thin  / Ruth Enjoys Negro Life in Chicago   /  Ruth, the  Bible, & a Marriage Certificate 

Ruth Anxious Aout War's End Plans to return to Will's Point  

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Selected Letters  Selected Diary Notes

Memories of Marcus B. Christian (CainsChristian's BioBibliographical Record    Introduction to I AM NEW ORLEANS 

A Theory of a Black Aesthetic   Magpies, Goddesses, & Black Male Identity

Activist Works on Next Level of Change   Intro to I Am New Orleans   Letter from Dillard University

A Labor of Genuine Love  Letter of Gift of Photos   Letters from LSU and Skip Gates

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Negro Iron Workers of Louisiana: 1718-1900

By Marcus Bruce Christian

 

Study of the blacksmith tradition and New Orleans famous lace balconies and fences.

Acclaimed during his life as the unofficial poet laureate of the New Orleans African-American community, Marcus Christian recorded a distinguished career as historian, journalist, and literary scholar. He was a contributor to Pelican's Gumbo Ya Ya, and also wrote many articles that appeared in numerous newspapers, journals, and general-interest publications.

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AALBC.com's 25 Best Selling Books


 

Fiction

#1 - Justify My Thug by Wahida Clark
#2 - Flyy Girl by Omar Tyree
#3 - Head Bangers: An APF Sexcapade by Zane
#4 - Life Is Short But Wide by J. California Cooper
#5 - Stackin' Paper 2 Genesis' Payback by Joy King
#6 - Thug Lovin' (Thug 4) by Wahida Clark
#7 - When I Get Where I'm Going by Cheryl Robinson
#8 - Casting the First Stone by Kimberla Lawson Roby
#9 - The Sex Chronicles: Shattering the Myth by Zane

#10 - Covenant: A Thriller  by Brandon Massey

#11 - Diary Of A Street Diva  by Ashley and JaQuavis

#12 - Don't Ever Tell  by Brandon Massey

#13 - For colored girls who have considered suicide  by Ntozake Shange

#14 - For the Love of Money : A Novel by Omar Tyree

#15 - Homemade Loves  by J. California Cooper

#16 - The Future Has a Past: Stories by J. California Cooper

#17 - Player Haters by Carl Weber

#18 - Purple Panties: An Eroticanoir.com Anthology by Sidney Molare

#19 - Stackin' Paper by Joy King

#20 - Children of the Street: An Inspector Darko Dawson Mystery by Kwei Quartey

#21 - The Upper Room by Mary Monroe

#22 – Thug Matrimony  by Wahida Clark

#23 - Thugs And The Women Who Love Them by Wahida Clark

#24 - Married Men by Carl Weber

#25 - I Dreamt I Was in Heaven - The Rampage of the Rufus Buck Gang by Leonce Gaiter

Non-fiction

#1 - Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention by Manning Marable
#2 - Confessions of a Video Vixen by Karrine Steffans
#3 - Dear G-Spot: Straight Talk About Sex and Love by Zane
#4 - Letters to a Young Brother: MANifest Your Destiny by Hill Harper
#5 - Peace from Broken Pieces: How to Get Through What You're Going Through by Iyanla Vanzant
#6 - Selected Writings and Speeches of Marcus Garvey by Marcus Garvey
#7 - The Ebony Cookbook: A Date with a Dish by Freda DeKnight
#8 - The Isis Papers: The Keys to the Colors by Frances Cress Welsing
#9 - The Mis-Education of the Negro by Carter Godwin Woodson

#10 - John Henrik Clarke and the Power of Africana History  by Ahati N. N. Toure

#11 - Fail Up: 20 Lessons on Building Success from Failure by Tavis Smiley

#12 -The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander

#13 - The Black Male Handbook: A Blueprint for Life by Kevin Powell

#14 - The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates by Wes Moore

#15 - Why Men Fear Marriage: The Surprising Truth Behind Why So Many Men Can't Commit  by RM Johnson

#16 - Black Titan: A.G. Gaston and the Making of a Black American Millionaire by Carol Jenkins

#17 - Brainwashed: Challenging the Myth of Black Inferiority by Tom Burrell

#18 - A New Earth: Awakening to Your Life's Purpose by Eckhart Tolle

#19 - John Oliver Killens: A Life of Black Literary Activism by Keith Gilyard

#20 - Alain L. Locke: The Biography of a Philosopher by Leonard Harris

#21 - Age Ain't Nothing but a Number: Black Women Explore Midlife by Carleen Brice

#22 - 2012 Guide to Literary Agents by Chuck Sambuchino
#23 - Chicken Soup for the Prisoner's Soul by Tom Lagana
#24 - 101 Things Every Boy/Young Man of Color Should Know by LaMarr Darnell Shields

#25 - Beyond the Black Lady: Sexuality and the New African American Middle Class  by Lisa B. Thompson

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The Persistence of the Color Line

Racial Politics and the Obama Presidency

By Randall Kennedy

Among the best things about The Persistence of the Color Line is watching Mr. Kennedy hash through the positions about Mr. Obama staked out by black commentators on the left and right, from Stanley Crouch and Cornel West to Juan Williams and Tavis Smiley. He can be pointed. Noting the way Mr. Smiley consistently “voiced skepticism regarding whether blacks should back Obama” . . .

The finest chapter in The Persistence of the Color Line is so resonant, and so personal, it could nearly be the basis for a book of its own. That chapter is titled “Reverend Wright and My Father: Reflections on Blacks and Patriotism.”  Recalling some of the criticisms of America’s past made by Mr. Obama’s former pastor, Mr. Kennedy writes with feeling about his own father, who put each of his three of his children through Princeton but who “never forgave American society for its racist mistreatment of him and those whom he most loved.”  His father distrusted the police, who had frequently called him “boy,” and rejected patriotism. Mr. Kennedy’s father “relished Muhammad Ali’s quip that the Vietcong had never called him ‘nigger.’ ” The author places his father, and Mr. Wright, in sympathetic historical light.

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Sex at the Margins

Migration, Labour Markets and the Rescue Industry

By Laura María Agustín

This book explodes several myths: that selling sex is completely different from any other kind of work, that migrants who sell sex are passive victims and that the multitude of people out to save them are without self-interest. Laura Agustín makes a passionate case against these stereotypes, arguing that the label 'trafficked' does not accurately describe migrants' lives and that the 'rescue industry' serves to disempower them. Based on extensive research amongst both migrants who sell sex and social helpers, Sex at the Margins provides a radically different analysis. Frequently, says Agustin, migrants make rational choices to travel and work in the sex industry, and although they are treated like a marginalised group they form part of the dynamic global economy. Both powerful and controversial, this book is essential reading for all those who want to understand the increasingly important relationship between sex markets, migration and the desire for social justice. "Sex at the Margins rips apart distinctions between migrants, service work and sexual labour and reveals the utter complexity of the contemporary sex industry. This book is set to be a trailblazer in the study of sexuality."—Lisa Adkins, University of London

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The White Masters of the World

From The World and Africa, 1965

By W. E. B. Du Bois

W. E. B. Du Bois’ Arraignment and Indictment of White Civilization (Fletcher)

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Ancient African Nations

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The Death of Emmett Till by Bob Dylan  The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll  Only a Pawn in Their Game

Rev. Jesse Lee Peterson Thanks America for Slavery

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The Journal of Negro History issues at Project Gutenberg

The Haitian Declaration of Independence 1804  / January 1, 1804 -- The Founding of Haiti 

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update 2 March 2012

 

 

 

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