ChickenBones: A Journal

for Literary & Artistic African-American Themes

   

Home  ChickenBones Store (Books, DVDs, Music, and more)  

Google
 

Father LeDoux, 76, one of few Black Catholic priests in New Orleans and undoubtedly

the most beloved, will be replaced by a white priest, Rev. Michael Jacques.

 

 

Rev. Jerome LeDoux (photo left)

Archdiocese Stuns Oldest African-American Parish with Closure

Archbishop Removes Beloved Black Priest Rev. Jerome LeDoux, DWM

from St. Augustine Parish, New Orleans Black Catholic Church

 

The Archdiocese of New Orleans has confirmed its decision to dissolve historic St. Augustine Parish effective March 15, 2006. The Pastoral Council declares its opposition to this decision in a prayerful way, with a 10-hour vigil beginning at 2 p.m. Tuesday, March 14.

Pastoral Council president Sandra Gordon stated: “In a post-Katrina world, historic St. Augustine Parish is even more crucial to the healing process of our city. It represents stability and continuity in a faith-based community. It is the foundation of our past on which we are building a better future for all God’s children.”

St. Augustine is the one of the oldest multicultural Roman Catholic churches in the United States, established in 1841 as a historic place where slaves worshiped alongside free people of color and New Orleanians of all races.

St. Augustine is a cultural gathering place in the historical Treme neighborhood welcoming visitors from all over the world.

St. Augustine parishioners will continue to worship in their church as they have for 165 years.

The parish participated in an appeals process, later described by the Archdiocese as a “listening session.”

The pastoral council has worked and will continue to work diligently to conduct its affairs in an open and business–like manner.

Says Ms. Gordon, “We invite the entire New Orleans community to join us for ten hours of prayer, beginning at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, March 14, to pray that the Archdiocese will give St. Augustine until the end of the calendar year to demonstrate that it can survive and thrive as a vibrant, spiritual parish in the service of a healing New Orleans.”

Source: St. Augustine Catholic Church-New Orleans

*   *   *   *   *

Archbishop Removes Beloved Black Priest

from the oldest Black Catholic church in U.S.

Archbishop Hughes called me at 11:29 this morning to inform me that he had heard the recommendation of the Appeals Board that St. Augustine Church be closed as a parish as of March 15, 2006. He concurs with that recommendation,” Rev. Jerome LeDoux, DWM, this week told parishioners.LeDoux’s announcement signaled the end of his 16-year tenure at the oldest African American Roman Catholic Church in the United States.

(Left Photo, Parish Leaders )

“St. Augustine is among the parishes the archdiocese plans to consolidate as it seeks to deal with $84 million in uninsured losses,” according to an Associated Press report.

“The archdiocese is careful to point out that St. Augustine’s will only close as a parish but will still be open for mass on Sundays and some other functions like funerals and weddings.

“Its building suffered only wind damage from Katrina and will remain open. ‘Show up on Sunday, and you won’t miss a beat,’ said the Rev. William Maestri, a spokesman for the archdiocese.”

Father LeDoux, 76, one of few Black Catholic priests in New Orleans and undoubtedly the most beloved, will be replaced by a white priest, Rev. Michael Jacques.

The fact that Jacques is being brought in is a clear indication that the Archdiocese wants to get rid of LeDoux, who is know for hard-hitting but God-inspired columns in the Louisiana Weekly newspaper and other publications.

Repeated calls to the Archdiocese of New Orleans and emails from the San Francisco Bay View requesting comments were not returned or answered.

Source: Bay View (reposted)' Saturday, Mar. 18, 2006 at 8:13 AM / http://www.indybay.org/news/2006/03/1808498.php

*   *   *   *   *

Catholic Hierarchy Engaged in Ethnic Cleansing

Archbishop removes beloved Black parish priest from the oldest Black Catholic church in U.S.

By CC Campbell-Rock

You shall know the truth and the truth shall make you free.” – John 8:32

“Archbishop Hughes called me at 11:29 this morning to inform me that he had heard the recommendation of the Appeals Board that St. Augustine Church be closed as a parish as of March 15, 2006. He concurs with that recommendation,” Rev. Jerome LeDoux, DWM, this week told parishioners.

(Right Photo, Tomb of the Unknown Slave)

LeDoux’s announcement signaled the end of his 16-year tenure at the oldest African American Roman Catholic Church in the United States.

“St. Augustine is among the parishes the archdiocese plans to consolidate as it seeks to deal with $84 million in uninsured losses,” according to an Associated Press report.

“The archdiocese is careful to point out that St. Augustine’s will only close as a parish but will still be open for mass on Sundays and some other functions like funerals and weddings.

“Its building suffered only wind damage from Katrina and will remain open. ‘Show up on Sunday, and you won’t miss a beat,’ said the Rev. William Maestri, a spokesman for the archdiocese.”

Father LeDoux, 76, one of few Black Catholic priests in New Orleans and undoubtedly the most beloved, will be replaced by a white priest, Rev. Michael Jacques.

The fact that Jacques is being brought in is a clear indication that the Archdiocese wants to get rid of LeDoux, who is know for hard-hitting but God-inspired columns in the Louisiana Weekly newspaper and other publications.

Repeated calls to the Archdiocese of New Orleans and emails from the San Francisco Bay View requesting comments were not returned or answered.

The loss of LeDoux’s unique ministry also represents the loss of control, by African Americans, of a national treasure and historic landmark.

Dedicated in 1842, St. Augustine Catholic Church, located at 1410 Governor Nicholls St. in New Orleans’ famed Treme neighborhood, the oldest Black subdivision in America, was partially financed by free people of color and built by freedmen and slaves alike.

In losing LeDoux, the parish of St. Augustine Catholic Church is also losing a 164-year tradition of serving the African-American community, as well as LeDoux’s inimitable masses.

His weekly celebrations of faith spoke to the souls of all parishioners. So popular were his masses that his Sunday mass attracted visitors from all over the world. And because LeDoux speaks at least five languages, he greeted and often conversed with celebrants from France, Germany, Sweden, Russia, and Rome in their own languages.

From jazzy versions of the “Our Father” prayer to the incorporation of the Negro spirituals, “This Little Light of Mine,” “When the Saints Go Marching In,” and “We Shall Overcome,” and even the soul-stirring Motown hit, “Reach Out and Touch Somebody’s Hand,” when you attended Rev. LeDoux’s masses, you left with the gospel within and a respect and love for all humanity.

“The timing is very bad. St. Augustine’s is almost ready to resume worship,” added LeDoux, who says he will return to the Divine Word Missionary Seminary in Bay Saint Louis until he gets another assignment.

The appointment of Rev. Jacques, who sometimes wears kente cloth during masses at nearby St. Peter Claver Church, also a Black parish, is symbolic of the ethnic cleansing campaign being carried out by the Roman Catholic Church leadership in New Orleans.

Rev. Jacques made headlines last June when he joined Rabbi Ed Cohn of Temple Sinai in protesting the New Orleans Police Department’s contract with security expert Capt. Dennis Muhammad, CEO of ENOTA (Educating Neighborhoods to Obey Those in Authority).

Capt. Muhammad had been contracted to provide racial sensitivity training seminars to police officers. However, the fact that Muhammad had been the Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan’s security director for 25 years immediately disqualified him in the eyes of Jacques and Cohn.

Although he had conducted successful workshops in New York and other states and also received a grant from a Jewish foundation to work with the NYPD, Muhammad’s track record didn’t persuade the men of the cloth.

Jacques said the Nation of Islam has “spoken so negatively” about Jews and Christians that it raises the question of whether the program is “really going to be the way for us to work together as a community.” according to WorldNetDaily.

“Cohn compared the Nation of Islam to the Ku Klux Klan and asserted that, ‘The character of any individual that associates with Louis Farrakhan is tainted,’” according to another news report.

The two raised so much hell that Muhammad’s contract with the NOPD was cancelled.

Apparently, Muhammad was tried and convicted, in the court of popular opinion, of guilt by association. It was the same fate that would befall LeDoux less than a year later.

In January 2006, St. Augustine Catholic Church played host to a multi-denominational ecumenical service. The event was to have taken place at Rev. Dwight Webster’s Christian Unity Baptist Church, but utilities had not yet been restored to that church.

Father LeDoux was called upon in the 12th hour to open his sanctuary to the gathering. St. Augustine had sustained only minor wind damage, so he agreed.

The event’s keynote speaker was the Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan.

Minister Farrakhan spoke at the service about how God punished Louisiana and that if the politicians continued to mistreat the least among them, Katrina would be only the first of many disaster to visit the city.

Moreover, during his annual Savior’s Day address, Farrakhan last week “condemned the role of the Roman Church as the mother of White supremacy and the global practice of slave-making, and its silence in the face of the 300 years that Black people were enslaved in this country,” according to The Final Call newspaper.

The Nation of Islam’s leader’s presence at St. Augustine coupled with his recent statement probably had a little to do with LeDoux getting his walking papers less than two months later.

However, the wholesale gentrification and ethnic cleansing that is going on in New Orleans today – from voter disenfranchisement to FEMA’s lack of response to developers and their redevelopment plans – is catching, and the Roman Catholic Church is doing its part to repel Black leadership such as LeDoux’s.

This is the same church that had Black people sitting on the back pews until the federal courts declared integration the law and the same church that collected money from the back pews while relegating Blacks to second-class status.

And Archbishop Alfred Hughes has a “tainted” past himself. He was the second in command to Boston’s Cardinal Bernard Law, who was at the center of a major grand jury investigation of the pedophile priest scandal that rocked the nation.

“Law has insisted he left the disciplining of individual priests to his top subordinates – including Hughes, who served as Law’s chief operation officer and vicar of administration from November 1990 to January 1993,” according to the Providence Phoenix newspaper. Hughes also had to testify before the grand jury.

“In 1992, Hughes received a call from the Plymouth County District Attorney’s Office regarding a Hingham pastor named Father John Hanlon, who had been indicted on child-rape charges. Hughes knew Hanlon had other victims. But he withheld the names of those who had complained to the Boston archdiocese,” the Providence Phoenix reported.

“Only a few other church officials have had access to the secret archives of the archdiocese of Boston during Law’s tenure. Among them was Law’s former second-in-command, Alfred C. Hughes, who is now archbishop of New Orleans.”

Hughes also last year boycotted a ceremony honoring the Landrieu family because both Mitch Landrieu, the state lieutenant governor who is now running for mayor, and his sister, U.S. Sen. Mary Landrieu, support a woman’s right to choose.

However, Hughes, who has only been in New Orleans for the past five years, apparently couldn’t care less about the historical legacy of St. Augustine.

St. Augustine Church, named for Saint Augustine of Hippo, an African bishop who lived from 354 to 430, has been the church home to many of the city’s prominent free people of color, slaves and African Americans.

The property on which St. Augustine stands was part of the plantation estate which had been a tilery and brickyard headquarters built in 1720 by the Company of the Indies as an economic stimulus for the province.

In 1731, the plantation was sold to the Moreau family, eventually coming into the possession of Julie Moreau, a manumitted slave, in 1775. Claude Treme, a Frenchman, married Julie Moreau, thus taking title to the property.

They sold off lots to free people of color and others pouring in from the Old Quarter jammed with Haitian immigrants fleeing the bloody 1791 revolution in Haiti.

Later, Henriette Delille, a free woman of color, and Juliette Gaudin, a Cuban, began aiding slaves, orphan girls, the uneducated, the sick and the elderly among people of color around 1823. Today, Delille, who has been beatified, is being considered for sainthood.

The two women knelt publicly at the altar of St. Augustine Church on Nov. 21, 1842, and pledged to live in the community and serve its people. They founded the Congregation of the Sisters of the Holy Family. The school they founded, the all-girls St. Mary’s Academy, recently merged with the all-boys St. Augustine High School and all-girls Xavier Preparatory High School.

Additionally, historical figures such as Homer Plessy, the plaintiff in Plessy vs. Ferguson, which resulted in the U.S. Supreme Court’s “separate but equal” decision of May 18, 1896, and Alexander P. Tureaud Sr., a giant among civil rights attorneys, were members of St. Augustine Church.

*   *   *   *    *

If you disagree with the termination of Rev. Jerome LeDoux, here’s what you can do: Write to Archbishop Hughes in care of Rev. Maestri at communications@archdiocese-no.org or call Bishop Morin at (504) 861-6262 or write to him at bishopmorin@archdiocese-no.org.

You can also write to the Holy See, Pope Benedict XVI at office@net.va, or at the Vatican newspaper, L’Osservatore Romano, ornet@ossrom.va, or call the Vatican switchboard, +39.06.6982, the Basilica of Saint Peter Sacristy, +39.06.69883712, or the Parish Office, +39.06.69885435 or +39.06.69883653; fax +39.06.69885793.

*   *   *   *   *

CC Campbell-Rock, a native New Orleanian, veteran journalist and Katrina evacuee, is now the editor of the Bay View. Email her at campbellrock@sfbayview.com.

Source: BayView  http://sfbayview.com/031506/ethniccleansing031506.shtml

*   *   *   *   *

Summary of Church History

 

The property on which St. Augustine stands was part of the plantation estate which had been a tilery and brickyard headquarters built in 1720 by the province of New Orleans’ supervisor, the Company of the Indies, as an economic stimulus for the province. After the Company of the Indies left in 1731, the plantation was sold to the Moreau family, eventually coming into the possession of Julie Moreau, a manumitted slave, in 1775. Claude Treme, a Frenchman, married Julie Moreau, thus taking title to the property. Seeing a chance to make a profit, the husband and wife subdivided the estate and sold off many lots on a first-come-first-served basis to free people of color and others pouring in from the Old Quarter jammed with Haitian immigrants fleeing the bloody 1791 revolution in Haiti.

After selling 35 lots, Claude and Julie Treme left their plantation home for a more peaceful life in 1810. In 1834, Jeanne Marie Aliquot purchased the Treme’s former home and property from the city of New Orleans and brought in the United States’ first Catholic elementary school for free girls of color and a few slaves. This school had been started in 1823 by Marthe Fortier, a onetime postulant of the Hospital Nuns. Jeanne Marie Aliquot became a major catalyst in the origins of St. Augustine Church.

Under economic duress from her social ventures, Jeanne Marie sold the house to the Ursuline Sisters in 1836.

They in turn sold the property to the Carmelites in 1840, who then took over the little school for colored girls and merged it with their school for white girls. The Carmelite Sisters used the Treme home for their motherhouse until 1926 when they moved out to Robert E. Lee Boulevard in the West End section of New Orleans.

In the late 1830s, when free people of color got permission from Bishop Antoine Blanc to build a church, the Ursulines donated the corner property at Bayou Road (now Governor Nicholls St.) and St. Claude which they had bought for $10,000, on the condition that the church be named after their foundress, St. Angela Merici. However, circumstances dictated that the church was named St. Augustine.

(Photo left, Mount Caramel Motherhouse)

A few months before the October 9, 1842 dedication of St. Augustine Church, the people of color began to purchase pews for their families to sit. Upon hearing of this, white people in the area started a campaign to buy more pews than the colored folks. Thus, The War of the Pews began and was ultimately won by the free people of color who bought three pews to every one purchased by the whites. In an unprecedented social, political and religious move, the colored members also bought all the pews of both side aisles. They gave those pews to the slaves as their exclusive place of worship, a first in the history of slavery in the United States.

This mix of the pews resulted in the most integrated congregation in the entire country: one large row of free people of color, one large row of whites with a smattering of ethnics, and two outer aisles of slaves. Except for a brief six-month period when its sanctuary was enlarged and blessed in time for Christmas 1925, St. Augustine Church has been in continuous use as a place of worship until the present time.

In the midst of all these things, Henriette Delille, a free woman of color, and Juliette Gaudin, a Cuban, began aiding slaves, orphan girls, the uneducated, the sick and the elderly among people of color around 1823.

Their particular concern for the education and care of colored children aided greatly in the founding, financing, staffing and administration of the city’s early private schools for the colored.

At the urging of Jeanne Marie Aliquot and the wise counseling of Pere Etienne Rousselin, the two women knelt publicly at the altar of St. Augustine Church on November 21, 1842 and pledged to live in community to work for orphan girls, the uneducated, the poor, the sick and the elderly among the free people of color, thus founding the Congregation of the Sisters of the Holy Family, after the Oblates of Providence founded in Baltimore in 1828, the second-oldest African-American congregation of religious women.

Historical figures such as Homer Plessy, of Plessy vs. Ferguson fame from the U.S. Supreme Court decision on May 18, 1896, and Alexander P. Tureaud, Sr., a giant among the civil rights attorneys of the stormy sixties, were members of St. Augustine Church

Source: St. Augustine Catholic Church-New Orleans

posted 18 March 2006

*   *   *   *   *

AALBC.com's 25 Best Selling Books


 

Fiction

#1 - Justify My Thug by Wahida Clark
#2 - Flyy Girl by Omar Tyree
#3 - Head Bangers: An APF Sexcapade by Zane
#4 - Life Is Short But Wide by J. California Cooper
#5 - Stackin' Paper 2 Genesis' Payback by Joy King
#6 - Thug Lovin' (Thug 4) by Wahida Clark
#7 - When I Get Where I'm Going by Cheryl Robinson
#8 - Casting the First Stone by Kimberla Lawson Roby
#9 - The Sex Chronicles: Shattering the Myth by Zane

#10 - Covenant: A Thriller  by Brandon Massey

#11 - Diary Of A Street Diva  by Ashley and JaQuavis

#12 - Don't Ever Tell  by Brandon Massey

#13 - For colored girls who have considered suicide  by Ntozake Shange

#14 - For the Love of Money : A Novel by Omar Tyree

#15 - Homemade Loves  by J. California Cooper

#16 - The Future Has a Past: Stories by J. California Cooper

#17 - Player Haters by Carl Weber

#18 - Purple Panties: An Eroticanoir.com Anthology by Sidney Molare

#19 - Stackin' Paper by Joy King

#20 - Children of the Street: An Inspector Darko Dawson Mystery by Kwei Quartey

#21 - The Upper Room by Mary Monroe

#22 – Thug Matrimony  by Wahida Clark

#23 - Thugs And The Women Who Love Them by Wahida Clark

#24 - Married Men by Carl Weber

#25 - I Dreamt I Was in Heaven - The Rampage of the Rufus Buck Gang by Leonce Gaiter

Non-fiction

#1 - Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention by Manning Marable
#2 - Confessions of a Video Vixen by Karrine Steffans
#3 - Dear G-Spot: Straight Talk About Sex and Love by Zane
#4 - Letters to a Young Brother: MANifest Your Destiny by Hill Harper
#5 - Peace from Broken Pieces: How to Get Through What You're Going Through by Iyanla Vanzant
#6 - Selected Writings and Speeches of Marcus Garvey by Marcus Garvey
#7 - The Ebony Cookbook: A Date with a Dish by Freda DeKnight
#8 - The Isis Papers: The Keys to the Colors by Frances Cress Welsing
#9 - The Mis-Education of the Negro by Carter Godwin Woodson

#10 - John Henrik Clarke and the Power of Africana History  by Ahati N. N. Toure

#11 - Fail Up: 20 Lessons on Building Success from Failure by Tavis Smiley

#12 -The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander

#13 - The Black Male Handbook: A Blueprint for Life by Kevin Powell

#14 - The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates by Wes Moore

#15 - Why Men Fear Marriage: The Surprising Truth Behind Why So Many Men Can't Commit  by RM Johnson

#16 - Black Titan: A.G. Gaston and the Making of a Black American Millionaire by Carol Jenkins

#17 - Brainwashed: Challenging the Myth of Black Inferiority by Tom Burrell

#18 - A New Earth: Awakening to Your Life's Purpose by Eckhart Tolle

#19 - John Oliver Killens: A Life of Black Literary Activism by Keith Gilyard

#20 - Alain L. Locke: The Biography of a Philosopher by Leonard Harris

#21 - Age Ain't Nothing but a Number: Black Women Explore Midlife by Carleen Brice

#22 - 2012 Guide to Literary Agents by Chuck Sambuchino
#23 - Chicken Soup for the Prisoner's Soul by Tom Lagana
#24 - 101 Things Every Boy/Young Man of Color Should Know by LaMarr Darnell Shields

#25 - Beyond the Black Lady: Sexuality and the New African American Middle Class  by Lisa B. Thompson

*   *   *   *   *

Greenback Planet: How the Dollar Conquered

the World and Threatened Civilization as We Know It

By H. W. Brands

In Greenback Planet, acclaimed historian H. W. Brands charts the dollar's astonishing rise to become the world's principal currency. Telling the story with the verve of a novelist, he recounts key episodes in U.S. monetary history, from the Civil War debate over fiat money (greenbacks) to the recent worldwide financial crisis. Brands explores the dollar's changing relations to gold and silver and to other currencies and cogently explains how America's economic might made the dollar the fundamental standard of value in world finance. He vividly describes the 1869 Black Friday attempt to corner the gold market, banker J. P. Morgan's bailout of the U.S. treasury, the creation of the Federal Reserve, and President Franklin Roosevelt's handling of the bank panic of 1933. Brands shows how lessons learned (and not learned) in the Great Depression have influenced subsequent U.S. monetary policy, and how the dollar's dominance helped transform economies in countries ranging from Germany and Japan after World War II to Russia and China today. He concludes with a sobering dissection of the 2008 world financial debacle, which exposed the power--and the enormous risks--of the dollar's worldwide reign.  The Economy

*   *   *   *   *

Sex at the Margins

Migration, Labour Markets and the Rescue Industry

By Laura María Agustín

This book explodes several myths: that selling sex is completely different from any other kind of work, that migrants who sell sex are passive victims and that the multitude of people out to save them are without self-interest. Laura Agustín makes a passionate case against these stereotypes, arguing that the label 'trafficked' does not accurately describe migrants' lives and that the 'rescue industry' serves to disempower them. Based on extensive research amongst both migrants who sell sex and social helpers, Sex at the Margins provides a radically different analysis. Frequently, says Agustin, migrants make rational choices to travel and work in the sex industry, and although they are treated like a marginalised group they form part of the dynamic global economy. Both powerful and controversial, this book is essential reading for all those who want to understand the increasingly important relationship between sex markets, migration and the desire for social justice. "Sex at the Margins rips apart distinctions between migrants, service work and sexual labour and reveals the utter complexity of the contemporary sex industry. This book is set to be a trailblazer in the study of sexuality."—Lisa Adkins, University of London

*   *   *   *   *

The White Masters of the World

From The World and Africa, 1965

By W. E. B. Du Bois

W. E. B. Du Bois’ Arraignment and Indictment of White Civilization (Fletcher)

*   *   *   *   *

Ancient African Nations

*   *   *   *   *

If you like this page consider making a donation

online through PayPal

*   *   *   *   *

Negro Digest / Black World

Browse all issues


1950        1960        1965        1970        1975        1980        1985        1990        1995        2000 ____ 2005        

Enjoy!

*   *   *   *   *

The Death of Emmett Till by Bob Dylan  The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll  Only a Pawn in Their Game

Rev. Jesse Lee Peterson Thanks America for Slavery / George Jackson  / Hurricane Carter

*   *   *   *   *

The Journal of Negro History issues at Project Gutenberg

The Haitian Declaration of Independence 1804  / January 1, 1804 -- The Founding of Haiti 

*   *   *   *   *

*   *   *   *   *

ChickenBones Store (Books, DVDs, Music, and more)

 

 

 

 

 

update 2 March 2012

 

 

 

Home  Katrina New Orleans Flood Index   Literary New Orleans Poems and Prose  Negro Catholic Writers Table

Related Articles: The Conspiracy to Whiten New Orleans   In New Orleans, Smaller Means Whiter   80% of NO Blacks May Not Return  Mother Mary Elizabeth  ELange