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Gerard, who just turned 7 in February, was pulled off the dirt bike he sat on — with the motor off — by police

while waiting for his father to pick him up in East Baltimore, according to his mother, Likisa Dinkins. Dinkins

said she was incensed after the police pulled Gerard up by his collar and dragged him off the bike.

 

 

 

Seven-Year-Old Black Child Arrested, Cuffed, Fingerprinted

in Baltimore a City with a Black Mayor, Sheila Dixon

 

After the Mayor apologizes for the arrest of Gerard Mungo Jr., City Police arrest Gerard's mom

“If they want war, they’ll have war,” said Marvin “Doc” Cheatham,

president of the NAACP Baltimore Chapter outside Central Booking

 

I am very concerned about what I am hearing. As a mother and as a parent, I am bothered by it,”

[Mayor Sheila Dixon] she said. “I will get to the bottom of this.”

 

BALTIMORE - Gerard Mungo Jr. starts to cry when he tells the story of his arrest by the Baltimore City police. Since he was handcuffed, photographed for a mug shot and fingerprinted Tuesday afternoon — all for allegedly sitting on a dirt bike on a sidewalk — Gerard said he is afraid to talk about it.

“They scared me,” he said, before breaking down in tears.

Gerard, who just turned 7 in February, was pulled off the dirt bike he sat on — with the motor off — by police while waiting for his father to pick him up in East Baltimore, according to his mother, Likisa Dinkins. Dinkins said she was incensed after the police pulled Gerard up by his collar and dragged him off the bike.

Seven-year old Gerard Mungo Jr. sits back on his living room couch after telling the story of his arrest by the Baltimore City Police Department.

“I told them to let go of my baby,” she said. “Since when do you pull a 7-year-old child by his neck and drag him?

“It broke my heart the way they were treating him.”

Dinkins said she called for a police supervisor to intervene, but after he arrived, Dinkins said, he started scolding her son.

“The started yelling at him, ‘Do you know what you did wrong, son?’” she said. “He was so scared he ran upstairs.”

After police confiscated the dirt bike, Dinkins said, the police said her son was under arrest.

“They put his hands behind his back and put him in black metal handcuffs. They handcuffed a 7-year-old child,” she said. “I cannot believe they did this to a child.”

Gerard was brought to the Eastern District station house, where he was cuffed to a bench, then interrogated, he told The Examiner.

“They asked about my mother,” he said.

Charging documents state that Gerard was charged with riding a dirt bike on city streets. He was released into the custody of his parents after being fingerprinted and photographed.

Mayor Sheila Dixon said she was concerned about the arrest.

“I am very concerned about what I am hearing. As a mother and as a parent, I am bothered by it,” she said. “I will get to the bottom of this.”

Police officials said they did not have enough information on the arrest to comment before press time.

Dinkins’ only concern is for her son’s well-being.

“This has changed his life,” she said. “He’ll never be the same.”

Stephen Janis, The Examiners / janis@baltimoreexaminer.com / Mar 15, 2007 3:00 AM (1 day ago)

posted 16 March 2007  http://www.wbaltv.com/news/11271436/detail.html?taf=bal

Response

Gerard’s sitting on his bike near or on a public road reservation, could well raise some public safety and wellbeing issue. Such a misbehavior however, does not rise to the level of a crime warranting the draconian act of arrest, handcuffing and physical abuse of a 7-year old child! In a “civilized” society, we would expect the “Peace Officers,” if Peace Officers these … can be called, to explain to little Gerard Mungo Jr. the dangers presented by an underage child riding on the road. Next, professionally, the Police Officers would escort the child home. Then notify his parent(s) of the problems and consequences of leaving their child unsupervised, sitting on his bike on the side of the road.

The barbaric act against a Black 7-year old, by public officials in a city with a black Mayor and a black Commissioner of Police may be pointing to a larger societal problem–a severe crisis in America.

Well thinking persons may conclude that if public officials believe that a child can be abused with impunity in a “civilized” state, then such a society must be wobbling into deeper and deeper calamity. Imbibed racist values and its siblings, our dominant, redundant social, economic and political principles are the best explanation for the City of Baltimore’s shameful conduct. It is a sign of social bankruptcy! If our society is morally bankrupt, it is a condition created by the germ of our dominant bankrupt social, economic and political worldviews. Thus Baltimore’s shame cannot be blamed on the offending policemen, only. Instead it must be laid squarely on the shoulders of our elites, whose ideas and standard of social conduct created the injustice that Gerard Mungo Jr. experienced in Baltimore.Lloyd D. McCarthy, author of In-Dependence from Bondage

 

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After the Mayor apologizes for the arrest of Gerard Mungo Jr., City Police arrest Gerard's mom

“If they want war, they’ll have war,” said Marvin “Doc” Cheatham,

president of the NAACP Baltimore Chapter outside Central Booking

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The officer took the boy to the Eastern District station, where Mungo Sr. and Dinkins say he spent two hours handcuffed to a bench. If there were a Richter scale that measured outrage, this incident would have blown the needle off the thing. . . . Dinkins said the officer who arrested Gerard is white, as is the officer's supervisor, who came to the scene after she complained. . . . What she might see if she looked in the mirror is the fury still in her eyes one week after, she says, the arresting officer waved a pair of handcuffs in her face and told her just before he arrested Gerard, "He's coming with me." . . . .. But Dinkins, [Police Commissioner Leonard D.] Hamm said, called for a supervisor. It was after the supervisor arrived that Gerard was arrested. Hamm said police are investigating what happened between the supervisor and Dinkins that led to the arrest. . . . In her house later, Dinkins said the supervisor "loud-talked" Gerard, raising his voice and bellowing, "Son, do you realize what you did was wrong?" . . . . It was after she demanded that the supervisor leave that Gerard was arrested, Dinkins said.
"I think they're mad because I asked for a supervisor," Dinkins said. "Gerard told me that the police officer who arrested him told him that 'if it weren't for your mother calling my boss, you wouldn't have went to jail.'"
Gregory Kane, "It's a crime that police arrested dirt-bike kid." (Sun, 21 March 2007)

 

posted 16 March 2007 / repost 26 March 2007

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AALBC.com's 25 Best Selling Books


 

Fiction

#1 - Justify My Thug by Wahida Clark
#2 - Flyy Girl by Omar Tyree
#3 - Head Bangers: An APF Sexcapade by Zane
#4 - Life Is Short But Wide by J. California Cooper
#5 - Stackin' Paper 2 Genesis' Payback by Joy King
#6 - Thug Lovin' (Thug 4) by Wahida Clark
#7 - When I Get Where I'm Going by Cheryl Robinson
#8 - Casting the First Stone by Kimberla Lawson Roby
#9 - The Sex Chronicles: Shattering the Myth by Zane

#10 - Covenant: A Thriller  by Brandon Massey

#11 - Diary Of A Street Diva  by Ashley and JaQuavis

#12 - Don't Ever Tell  by Brandon Massey

#13 - For colored girls who have considered suicide  by Ntozake Shange

#14 - For the Love of Money : A Novel by Omar Tyree

#15 - Homemade Loves  by J. California Cooper

#16 - The Future Has a Past: Stories by J. California Cooper

#17 - Player Haters by Carl Weber

#18 - Purple Panties: An Eroticanoir.com Anthology by Sidney Molare

#19 - Stackin' Paper by Joy King

#20 - Children of the Street: An Inspector Darko Dawson Mystery by Kwei Quartey

#21 - The Upper Room by Mary Monroe

#22 – Thug Matrimony  by Wahida Clark

#23 - Thugs And The Women Who Love Them by Wahida Clark

#24 - Married Men by Carl Weber

#25 - I Dreamt I Was in Heaven - The Rampage of the Rufus Buck Gang by Leonce Gaiter

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#1 - Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention by Manning Marable
#2 - Confessions of a Video Vixen by Karrine Steffans
#3 - Dear G-Spot: Straight Talk About Sex and Love by Zane
#4 - Letters to a Young Brother: MANifest Your Destiny by Hill Harper
#5 - Peace from Broken Pieces: How to Get Through What You're Going Through by Iyanla Vanzant
#6 - Selected Writings and Speeches of Marcus Garvey by Marcus Garvey
#7 - The Ebony Cookbook: A Date with a Dish by Freda DeKnight
#8 - The Isis Papers: The Keys to the Colors by Frances Cress Welsing
#9 - The Mis-Education of the Negro by Carter Godwin Woodson

#10 - John Henrik Clarke and the Power of Africana History  by Ahati N. N. Toure

#11 - Fail Up: 20 Lessons on Building Success from Failure by Tavis Smiley

#12 -The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander

#13 - The Black Male Handbook: A Blueprint for Life by Kevin Powell

#14 - The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates by Wes Moore

#15 - Why Men Fear Marriage: The Surprising Truth Behind Why So Many Men Can't Commit  by RM Johnson

#16 - Black Titan: A.G. Gaston and the Making of a Black American Millionaire by Carol Jenkins

#17 - Brainwashed: Challenging the Myth of Black Inferiority by Tom Burrell

#18 - A New Earth: Awakening to Your Life's Purpose by Eckhart Tolle

#19 - John Oliver Killens: A Life of Black Literary Activism by Keith Gilyard

#20 - Alain L. Locke: The Biography of a Philosopher by Leonard Harris

#21 - Age Ain't Nothing but a Number: Black Women Explore Midlife by Carleen Brice

#22 - 2012 Guide to Literary Agents by Chuck Sambuchino
#23 - Chicken Soup for the Prisoner's Soul by Tom Lagana
#24 - 101 Things Every Boy/Young Man of Color Should Know by LaMarr Darnell Shields

#25 - Beyond the Black Lady: Sexuality and the New African American Middle Class  by Lisa B. Thompson

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Sex at the Margins

Migration, Labour Markets and the Rescue Industry

By Laura María Agustín

This book explodes several myths: that selling sex is completely different from any other kind of work, that migrants who sell sex are passive victims and that the multitude of people out to save them are without self-interest. Laura Agustín makes a passionate case against these stereotypes, arguing that the label 'trafficked' does not accurately describe migrants' lives and that the 'rescue industry' serves to disempower them. Based on extensive research amongst both migrants who sell sex and social helpers, Sex at the Margins provides a radically different analysis. Frequently, says Agustin, migrants make rational choices to travel and work in the sex industry, and although they are treated like a marginalised group they form part of the dynamic global economy. Both powerful and controversial, this book is essential reading for all those who want to understand the increasingly important relationship between sex markets, migration and the desire for social justice. "Sex at the Margins rips apart distinctions between migrants, service work and sexual labour and reveals the utter complexity of the contemporary sex industry. This book is set to be a trailblazer in the study of sexuality."—Lisa Adkins, University of London

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The New Jim Crow

Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness

By Michele Alexander

Contrary to the rosy picture of race embodied in Barack Obama's political success and Oprah Winfrey's financial success, legal scholar Alexander argues vigorously and persuasively that [w]e have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it. Jim Crow and legal racial segregation has been replaced by mass incarceration as a system of social control (More African Americans are under correctional control today... than were enslaved in 1850). Alexander reviews American racial history from the colonies to the Clinton administration, delineating its transformation into the war on drugs. She offers an acute analysis of the effect of this mass incarceration upon former inmates who will be discriminated against, legally, for the rest of their lives, denied employment, housing, education, and public benefits. Most provocatively, she reveals how both the move toward colorblindness and affirmative action may blur our vision of injustice: most Americans know and don't know the truth about mass incarceration—but her carefully researched, deeply engaging, and thoroughly readable book should change that.—Publishers Weekly

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The White Masters of the World

From The World and Africa, 1965

By W. E. B. Du Bois

W. E. B. Du Bois’ Arraignment and Indictment of White Civilization (Fletcher)

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Ancient African Nations

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The Death of Emmett Till by Bob Dylan  The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll  Only a Pawn in Their Game

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update 29 February 2012

 

 

 

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