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Sixty-one percent of people in South Africa now live below the poverty line, with more than

a third subsisting on less than $2 a day. The racial gap is greater with 96 percent of arable

South African farmland still owned by white people who make up only 13 percent of the population.

 

 

South African Oppression and Poverty

Under Mbeki and Mandela—“Worse than Apartheid!”

 

Mfanelo Skwatsha, Executive Secretary of the Pan Africanist Congress (PAC) of Azania (South Africa), will be a featured speaker at African People’s Solidarity Day events, October 13-21 in cities throughout the U.S.

During the PAC’s first U.S. tour in more than 25 years, Mr. Skwatsha will discuss the urgent need to build political and economic power for the growing millions of South Africans who have been pushed into greater poverty and oppression by the ruling African National Congress’ “Rainbow Nation.”

As Wendy Snyder, organizer of African People’s Solidarity Day, explains, “Many people around the world who supported the struggle against the apartheid system in South Africa erroneously believe that since the installation of Nelson Mandela and the African National Congress in 1994 conditions in South Africa have improved.

“However, as Mr. Skwatsha will show, the reality is the opposite. Many African workers say life in South Africa today is ‘worse than apartheid.’”

Statistics from the Southern African Regional Poverty Network (SARPN) expose that since the official end of apartheid in 1994, “those households living in poverty have sunk deeper into poverty and the gap between rich and poor has widened.”

Sixty-one percent of people in South Africa now live below the poverty line, with more than a third subsisting on less than $2 a day. The racial gap is greater with 96 percent of arable South African farmland still owned by white people who make up only 13 percent of the population.

Formed in Soweto, South Africa in 1959, the Pan Africanist Congress was the popular party that led the campaign to end the notorious pass laws that required African people to present official identification to police upon demand under the apartheid system. PAC led the South African-wide movement following the Sharpeville Massacre against pass law protestors in 1960 and is the party of Steve Biko, leader of the Black Consciousness Movement.

PAC is still based in African communities throughout South Africa today. PAC organizes on many fronts for “true self-determination for African working people with the belief that Africa’s colonial borders must be abandoned in favor of one united Africa,” according to Snyder.

Mfanelo Skwatsha has been a member of the Pan Africanist Congress for more than 20 years. He has been a leading member of the organization on regional and then national levels since his student days at the University of Transkei where he holds degrees in social science and labor law.

Sponsored by the African People’s Solidarity Committee and the Uhuru Movement, African People’s Solidarity Day events will take place:

October 13 – 14 in Oakland, CA at Beebe Memorial Church, 3900 Telegraph Avenue
October 16 in St. Petersburg, FL at The Studio@620, 620 1st Avenue South
October 20 – 21 in Philadelphia, PA at International House, 3701 Chestnut Street

Source: Skwatsha     Burning Spear Uhuru

posted 30 September 2007

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The Haitian Revolution, 1791 to 1804: Or, Side Lights On the French Revolution

By Theophilus Gould Steward

This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.—Amazon.com

The Haitian Revolution, 1791 to 1804. By T. G. Steward. Thomas Y. Crowell Company, New York, 1915. 292 pages. $1.25.

Reviewed by J.R. Fauset. The Journal of Negro History. Vol. I., No. 1, January. 1916.

In the days when the internal dissensions of Haiti are again thrusting her into the limelight such a book as this of Mr. Steward assumes a peculiar importance. It combines the unusual advantage of being both very readable and at the same time historically dependable. At the outset the author gives a brief sketch of the early settlement of Haiti, followed by a short account of her development along commercial and racial lines up to the Revolution of 1791. The story of this upheaval, of course, forms the basis of the book and is indissolubly connected with the story of Toussaint L'Overture. To most Americans this hero is known only as the subject of Wendell Phillips's stirring eulogy. As delineated by Mr. Steward, he becomes a more human creature, who performs exploits, that are nothing short of marvelous. Other men who have seemed to many of us merely namesRigaud, Le Clerc, Desalines, and the like--are also fully discussed.

Although most of the book is naturally concerned with the revolutionary period, the author brings his account up to date by giving a very brief resumé of the history of Haiti from 1804 to the present time. This history is marked by the frequent occurrence of assassinations and revolutions, but the reader will not allow himself to be affected by disgust or prejudice at these facts particularly when he is reminded, as Mr. Steward says, "that the political history of Haiti does not differ greatly from that of the majority of South American Republics, nor does it differ widely even from that of France."

The book lacks a topical index, somewhat to its own disadvantage, but it contains a map of Haiti, a rather confusing appendix, a list of the Presidents of Haiti from 1804 to 1906 and a list of the names and works of the more noted Haitian authors. The author does not give a complete bibliography. He simply mentions in the beginning the names of a few authorities consulted.—J. R. Fauset.

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AALBC.com's 25 Best Selling Books


 

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Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes, and Black Women in America

By Melissa V. Harris-Perry

According to the author, this society has historically exerted considerable pressure on black females to fit into one of a handful of stereotypes, primarily, the Mammy, the Matriarch or the Jezebel.  The selfless Mammy’s behavior is marked by a slavish devotion to white folks’ domestic concerns, often at the expense of those of her own family’s needs. By contrast, the relatively-hedonistic Jezebel is a sexually-insatiable temptress. And the Matriarch is generally thought of as an emasculating figure who denigrates black men, ala the characters Sapphire and Aunt Esther on the television shows Amos and Andy and Sanford and Son, respectively.     

Professor Perry points out how the propagation of these harmful myths have served the mainstream culture well. For instance, the Mammy suggests that it is almost second nature for black females to feel a maternal instinct towards Caucasian babies.

As for the source of the Jezebel, black women had no control over their own bodies during slavery given that they were being auctioned off and bred to maximize profits. Nonetheless, it was in the interest of plantation owners to propagate the lie that sisters were sluts inclined to mate indiscriminately.

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Sex at the Margins

Migration, Labour Markets and the Rescue Industry

By Laura María Agustín

This book explodes several myths: that selling sex is completely different from any other kind of work, that migrants who sell sex are passive victims and that the multitude of people out to save them are without self-interest. Laura Agustín makes a passionate case against these stereotypes, arguing that the label 'trafficked' does not accurately describe migrants' lives and that the 'rescue industry' serves to disempower them. Based on extensive research amongst both migrants who sell sex and social helpers, Sex at the Margins provides a radically different analysis. Frequently, says Agustin, migrants make rational choices to travel and work in the sex industry, and although they are treated like a marginalised group they form part of the dynamic global economy. Both powerful and controversial, this book is essential reading for all those who want to understand the increasingly important relationship between sex markets, migration and the desire for social justice. "Sex at the Margins rips apart distinctions between migrants, service work and sexual labour and reveals the utter complexity of the contemporary sex industry. This book is set to be a trailblazer in the study of sexuality."—Lisa Adkins, University of London

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The Warmth of Other Suns

The Epic Story of America's Great Migration

By Isabel Wilkerson

Ida Mae Brandon Gladney, a sharecropper's wife, left Mississippi for Milwaukee in 1937, after her cousin was falsely accused of stealing a white man's turkeys and was almost beaten to death. In 1945, George Swanson Starling, a citrus picker, fled Florida for Harlem after learning of the grove owners' plans to give him a "necktie party" (a lynching). Robert Joseph Pershing Foster made his trek from Louisiana to California in 1953, embittered by "the absurdity that he was doing surgery for the United States Army and couldn't operate in his own home town." Anchored to these three stories is Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Wilkerson's magnificent, extensively researched study of the "great migration," the exodus of six million black Southerners out of the terror of Jim Crow to an "uncertain existence" in the North and Midwest. Wilkerson deftly incorporates sociological and historical studies into the novelistic narratives of Gladney, Starling, and Pershing settling in new lands, building anew, and often finding that they have not left racism behind. The drama, poignancy, and romance of a classic immigrant saga pervade this book, hold the reader in its grasp, and resonate long after the reading is done.

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The White Masters of the World

From The World and Africa, 1965

By W. E. B. Du Bois

W. E. B. Du Bois’ Arraignment and Indictment of White Civilization (Fletcher)

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Ancient African Nations

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The Death of Emmett Till by Bob Dylan  The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll  Only a Pawn in Their Game

Rev. Jesse Lee Peterson Thanks America for Slavery / George Jackson  / Hurricane Carter

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The Journal of Negro History issues at Project Gutenberg

The Haitian Declaration of Independence 1804  / January 1, 1804 -- The Founding of Haiti 

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update 25 February 2012

 

 

 

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