ChickenBones: A Journal

for  Literary & Artistic African-American  Themes

   

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slavery was central to the American economy, and since the document set the stage for a national

economy, the Constitution could not avoid having implications for slavery. Even more, since

the government defined sovereignty over individuals, as well as property in them, discussion of

sovereignty led directly to debate over slavery’s place in the new republic.   

 

 

Washerwomen 

in the Village of Brooklyn 1923

 

Note: N. B. h. stands for house / n. for near / c. for corner

Brown, Betsey, washerwoman, 5 alley n James

Ferguson. Judith, washerwoman 5 alley n James

Francis, Eliza., washerwoman 11 alley n James

James Havens, Susan, washerwoman 2 Stewart's alley

Jackson, Eve, black washerwoman 27 James*

Lefferts, Rosanna, washerwoman 3 alley n James

Mott, Harriet, washerwoman 9 Stewart's alley

Peterson, Susan, washerwoman 7 High

Sherrid, Fanny, washerwoman Joralemon n Dutch church

Soloman, Rachel, washerwoman 91 Sands

Thompson, Diana, washerwoman 9 Stewart's alley

Thompson, Susan, washerwoman 29 James

Williams, Betsey, washerwoman 1 Stewart's alley

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*The above census list does not list the race of the washerwomen, except for Eve Jackson. But based on the names and the listed races of those below, we might conclude based on their location (James Alley and Stewart Alley) in relation to those below that all of the washerwomen above were also black. Clearly, they were poor women who had been assigned to the most impoverished sections of Brooklyn, that is back streets and alleys

 

 

Williams Henry, black 2 Stewart's alley

Williams Lewis, black 7 alley n James

Anderson Nancy, black 1 Stewart's alley

Holland William, black 9 Stewart's alley

Marshall Adam, sweep 9 Stewart's alley

Simons Adam, black 11 alley n James

Sharpe Peter, black 6 alley n James

Seaman Aaron, black, 9 alley n James

Jackson Jack, black 11 alley n James

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Audio: My Story, My Song (Featuring blues guitarist Walter Wolfman Washington)

 

Slavery’s Constitution: From Revolution to Ratification (2009)

By David Waldstreicher

Taking on decades of received wisdom, David Waldstreicher has written the first book to recognize slavery’s place at the heart of the U.S. Constitution. Famously, the Constitution never mentions slavery. And yet, of its eighty-four clauses, six were directly concerned with slaves and the interests of their owners. Five other clauses had implications for slavery that were considered and debated by the delegates to the 1787 Constitutional Convention and the citizens of the states during ratification. This “peculiar institution” was not a moral blind spot for America’s otherwise enlightened framers, nor was it the expression of a mere economic interest. Slavery was as important to the making of the Constitution as the Constitution was to the survival of slavery.By tracing slavery from before the revolution, through the Constitution’s framing, and into the public debate that followed, Waldstreicher rigorously shows that slavery was not only actively discussed behind the closed and locked doors of the Constitutional Convention, but that it was also deftly woven into the Constitution itself. For one thing, slavery was central to the American economy, and since the document set the stage for a national economy, the Constitution could not avoid having implications for slavery. Even more, since the government defined sovereignty over individuals, as well as property in them, discussion of sovereignty led directly to debate over slavery’s place in the new republic.

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The White Masters of the World

From The World and Africa, 1965

By W. E. B. Du Bois

W. E. B. Du Bois’ Arraignment and Indictment of White Civilization (Fletcher)

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Ancient African Nations

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Negro Digest / Black World

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The Death of Emmett Till by Bob Dylan  The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll  Only a Pawn in Their Game

Rev. Jesse Lee Peterson Thanks America for Slavery

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The Journal of Negro History issues at Project Gutenberg

The Haitian Declaration of Independence 1804  / January 1, 1804 -- The Founding of Haiti 

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posted 22 June 2008

 

 

 

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