ChickenBones: A Journal

for Literary & Artistic African-American Themes

   

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remember the Native American and what your weapons of mass

destruction did to them remember the germ warfare of your blankets

remember your syphilis at Tuskegee you are the devil in the blue dress

 

 

Books by Marvin X

Love and War: Poems  / In the Crazy House Called America / Woman: Man's Best Friend Beyond Religion Toward Spirituality

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White Power

                     By Marvin X

 

They gloat as missiles fall on Baghdad
the cradle of civilization
the garden of Eden
but they wonder aloud with glee
of their precise technology
laser guided bombs
Cruise missiles from distant ships
they are happy now
murder incorporated back in business
or is it business as usual
when did they ever stop
yesterday it was Afghanistan
for oil and heroin
not about the Taliban and Bin Laden
oil and heroin
all power to the warlords
and Palestine burns in silence
impotent Arab armies froze in the desert of
imperial America
the new beast
the savage from the wilderness returns
for the last crusade
onward Christian soldiers
but remember Vietnam
the spirit of the people
is greater than the man's technology
now we shall see your weapons of mass destruction
as you test them on the battlefield
while the world cries against you
you gloat and glee of technology
such precision bombs
such missiles
the MOAB
the Stealth
the Shock and Awe of you
the mass murder in the name of white power
White supremacy
incessant talk of democracy
idle chatter
of white men in your senate chamber
this is not America
but white supremacy
and you shall see
the world is not white any longer
and you are not supreme
remember the African, he was here
remember the Native American and what your weapons of mass destruction did to them
remember the germ warfare of your blankets
remember your syphilis at Tuskegee
you are the devil in the blue dress
you are the snake, the serpent
who deceived the world
in the end, even your technology shall come against you
it shall unite the world to defeat you
the master peace breaker
the master exploiter
the world's greatest pimp
with so many whores your prisons cannot hold them
so you send them home to be harlots even still
there are no tricks for all your whores
and now your children are among them,
your daughters and even your sons
lost and turned out
seeking ecstasy in the night
searching for love
in all the wrong places
and you wonder why they hate you
after your plunder of the world
to insure their inheritance
but they are enraptured by rap
their pants sag on their asses
as they curse you like the nigguhs they want to be.
but you don't have a clue
with all your wisdom
the simple escapes you
your technology destroys your humanity
so you bomb and kill with glee
knowing full well it shall haunt you
homeland security shall not protect you
only the wisdom of the new age, the new era that escapes you
as you gather like cave men to plunder the garden.
And the gift of the garden
Is your final destruction.
You have it twisted
But we can see you as you dance naked in the desert
Like Adam and Eve, the fruit of the garden shall destroy you.

posted 20 March 2003

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The Heart of Whiteness

By Robert Jensen

The first, and perhaps most crucial, fear is that of facing the fact that some of what we white people have is unearned. It's a truism that we don't really make it on our own; we all have plenty of help to achieve whatever we achieve. That means that some of what we have is the product of the work of others, distributed unevenly across society, over which we may have little or no control individually. No matter how hard we work or how smart we are, we all know — when we are honest with ourselves — that we did not get where we are by merit alone. And many white people are afraid of that fact. A second fear is crasser: White people's fear of losing what we have — literally the fear of losing things we own if at some point the economic, political, and social systems in which we live become more just and equitable.Robert Jensen  

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1493: Uncovering the New World Columbus Created

By Charles C. Mann

I’m a big fan of Charles Mann’s previous book 1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus, in which he provides a sweeping and provocative examination of North and South America prior to the arrival of Christopher Columbus. It’s exhaustively researched but so wonderfully written that it’s anything but exhausting to read. With his follow-up, 1493, Mann has taken it to a new, truly global level. Building on the groundbreaking work of Alfred Crosby (author of The Columbian Exchange and, I’m proud to say, a fellow Nantucketer), Mann has written nothing less than the story of our world: how a planet of what were once several autonomous continents is quickly becoming a single, “globalized” entity.

Mann not only talked to countless scientists and researchers; he visited the places he writes about, and as a consequence, the book has a marvelously wide-ranging yet personal feel as we follow Mann from one far-flung corner of the world to the next. And always, the prose is masterful. In telling the improbable story of how Spanish and Chinese cultures collided in the Philippines in the sixteenth century, he takes us to the island of Mindoro whose “southern coast consists of a number of small bays, one next to another like tooth marks in an apple.”

We learn how the spread of malaria, the potato, tobacco, guano, rubber plants, and sugar cane have disrupted and convulsed the planet and will continue to do so until we are finally living on one integrated or at least close-to-integrated Earth. Whether or not the human instigators of all this remarkable change will survive the process they helped to initiate more than five hundred years ago remains, Mann suggests in this monumental and revelatory book, an open question.

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The Gardens of Democracy: A New American Story

of Citizenship, the Economy, and the Role of Government

By Eric Liu and Nick Hanaper

American democracy is informed by the 18th century’s most cutting edge thinking on society, economics, and government. We’ve learned some things in the intervening 230 years about self interest, social behaviors, and how the world works. Now, authors Eric Liu and Nick Hanauer argue that some fundamental assumptions about citizenship, society, economics, and government need updating. For many years the dominant metaphor for understanding markets and government has been the machine. Liu and Hanauer view democracy not as a machine, but as a garden. A successful garden functions according to the inexorable tendencies of nature, but it also requires goals, regular tending, and an understanding of connected ecosystems. The latest ideas from science, social science, and economics—the cutting-edge ideas of today—generate these simple but revolutionary ideas: The economy is not an efficient machine.

It’s an effective garden that need tending. Freedom is responsibility. Government should be about the big what and the little how. True self interest is mutual interest. We’re all better off when we’re all better off. The model of citizenship depends on contagious behavior, hence positive behavior begets positive behavior.

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The First Emancipator

The Forgotten Story of Robert Carter, the Founding Father Who Freed His Slaves

By Andrew Levy

In 1791, at a time when the nation's leaders were fervently debating the contradiction of slavery in a newly independent nation, wealthy Virginia plantation owner Robert Carter III freed more than 450 slaves. It was to be the largest emancipation until the Emancipation Proclamation, signed by Abraham Lincoln. Levy offers an absorbing look at the philosophical and religious debate and the political and family struggles in which Carter engaged for years before very deliberately and systematically freeing his slaves as he attempted to provide a model for others to follow. Drawing on historic documents, including Carter's letters and painstakingly detailed accounts of plantation activities, Levy conveys the strongly held beliefs that drove Carter through the political and religious fervor of the time to arrive at a decision at odds with those of other prominent leaders and slaveholders of the time, including George Washington and Thomas Jefferson. Levy offers a fascinating look at one man's redemption and his eventual lapse into historical obscurity despite his incredibly bold actions. Well researched and thoroughly fascinating, this forgotten history will appeal to readers interested in the complexities of American slavery.—Booklist

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Faces At The Bottom of the Well: The Permanence of Racism

By Derrick Bell

In nine grim metaphorical sketches, Bell, the black former Harvard law professor who made headlines recently for his one-man protest against the school's hiring policies, hammers home his controversial theme that white racism is a permanent, indestructible component of our society. Bell's fantasies are often dire and apocalyptic: a new Atlantis rises from the ocean depths, sparking a mass emigration of blacks; white resistance to affirmative action softens following an explosion that kills Harvard's president and all of the school's black professors; intergalactic space invaders promise the U.S. President that they will clean up the environment and deliver tons of gold, but in exchange, the bartering aliens take all African Americans back to their planet. Other pieces deal with black-white romance, a taxi ride through Harlem and job discrimination.

Civil rights lawyer Geneva Crenshaw, the heroine of Bell's And We Are Not Saved (1987), is back in some of these ominous allegories, which speak from the depths of anger and despair. Bell now teaches at New York University Law School.—Publishers Weekly

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The White Masters of the World

From The World and Africa, 1965

By W. E. B. Du Bois

W. E. B. Du Bois’ Arraignment and Indictment of White Civilization (Fletcher)

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Ancient African Nations

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The Death of Emmett Till by Bob Dylan  The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll  Only a Pawn in Their Game

Rev. Jesse Lee Peterson Thanks America for Slavery / George Jackson  / Hurricane Carter

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The Journal of Negro History issues at Project Gutenberg

The Haitian Declaration of Independence 1804  / January 1, 1804 -- The Founding of Haiti 

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update 7 February 2012

 

 

 

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Related files:  Theodore W. Allen and His Insights  White Privilege, White Entitlement, Election 2008   White Privilege   White Nationalism Black Interests